hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 656 14 Browse Search
United States (United States) 252 0 Browse Search
Zachary Taylor 164 8 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 140 0 Browse Search
V. H. Davis 126 0 Browse Search
John C. Calhoun 115 1 Browse Search
John Davis 115 1 Browse Search
Sidney Webster 112 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 112 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 84 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 336 total hits in 104 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
not unfounded fears of Indian invasion which existed in the valley of the Wabash. To protect Vincennes from a sudden assault, Captain Z. Taylor was ordered to Fort Harrison, a stockade on the river above Vincennes, and with his company of infantry, about fifty strong, made preparation to defend the place. He had not long to wait.l attack was made, the brave little garrison repulsed it with such loss to the assailants that when, in the following October, General Hopkins came to support Fort Harrison, no Indians were to be found thereabout. For the defence of Fort Harrison Captain Taylor received the brevet of major, an honor which had seldom if ever befoFort Harrison Captain Taylor received the brevet of major, an honor which had seldom if ever before been conferred for service in Indian war. In the following November Major Taylor, with a battalion of regulars, formed part of the command of General Hopkins in the expedition against the hostile Indians at the head waters of the Wabash. In 1814, with his separate command, being then a major by commission, he made a campaig
Santa Genoveva (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
arned by the rumors of a contemplated attack, only a few had gone to inspect their crops. Some hostile Indians had been seen lying in ambush, which alarmed the inhabitants, and they insisted on the Governor calling upon the authorities at St. Genevieve for assistance. He at last yielded unwillingly to their demands, and had, on May I, 1779, returned with sixty men, who were in the town when the attack was made. It was sudden and violent, and about twenty citizens were killed in the field before they could regain the fort. Sylvio Francisco de Cartabana, the Spanish Governor, had gone to St. Genevieve and brought the militia from that post to aid in the defence of the town. When the attack commenced neither Cartabana nor his promised force were forthcoming, but lay hidden in a garret until the foe had retired; but the citizens stationed fifteen men at each gate and scattered the rest of their force along the line. They answered the irregular fire of the Indians by grape-sho
Kaskaskia (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
heard his order, did not obey, he had a cannon fired at them which tore down a part of their wall of defence. He had previously, under the pretext of a trade proper to be made in a time of profound peace, sold all the powder and ammunition of the garrison to the Indians. Fortunately, in a private house, eight barrels of powder were discovered, and the citizens levied upon it, in the name of the king, for their defence. Colonel John Rogers Clarke, hearing of their peril, marched from Kaskaskia with a small force to the defence of the whites, but did not cross the river, as the Governor declined their services; but the Indians retreated. It was believed by the citizens that the Governors had been bribed by the British, who did not want any settlement there, lest it should revert to America, and become a stronghold against invasion by them. The Illini, or Illinois Confederacy, consisted of five tribes — the Kaskaskias, Cahokies, Peorians, Temorias, and Michiganians-and were n
Butte (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
eviated to Sac, means yellow earth; Musquakee, now Fox, red earth. These two warlike tribes eventually became amalgamated; they were originally from the St. Lawrence River. The Foxes first settled at Green Bay, and the river near which they made their abode still bears their name. There they sustained a signal defeat by the united forces of the friendly Indians and French troops, and the slaughter was so great that the hill on which the engagement took place has ever since been called the Butte des Morts. This was modified by an old frontier settler, Mrs. Arndt, into Betty Mores. From this and various other causes the two tribes were so depleted that they joined forces, and, though still keeping their community independence, became practically one tribe. The subsequent war with the Six Nations left them too weak to stand alone. La Houton speaks of a Sac village on Fox River in 1689, and Father Hennepin, in r680, speaks of them as Ortagamies, and says they were residents of th
Illinois river (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Black Hawk protested strongly until 1831, and finally agreed to move for $6,000. This sum was refused, and the old story of the wolf and the lamb was re-enacted. The whites complained that the Indians were interlopers and committed outrages. The Governor promised, in answer to the memorial, to remove the Indians dead or alive. On May 28, 1831, the Governor wrote to General Gaines that he could bring his seven hundred militia troops to meet a supposititious Indian invasion of the territory of Illinois; but brave old General Gaines replied, the next day, that it was not necessary; he had ordered six companies of United States troops from Jefferson Barracks to Rock Island, and four from Prairie du Chien, and did not deem any greater force necessary. On the 7th of June, 1831, General Gaines held a council on Rock Island. Black Hawk and his band, in full panoply of war, singing their war-songs, to show they were not afraid, went to the appointed place, but refused to enter the co
Mackinac (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
warlike people to a few mendicant stragglers, and thus barbarism and natural forces combined to aid the early settlers to drive the Indians not only out of their possessions, but out of existence. Environed by superior numbers on all sides, but inured to hardship and danger, the pioneers pressed forward, their feet red with the blood of both whites and Indians, and acquired acre by acre the lovely country east of the Mississippi. The American Fur Company had their principal post at Mackinac, with outposts scattered at different points on and near the Upper Mississippi. This advance-guard of civilization became wealthy, but took their lives in their hands, and it was an even chance whether they came out with the peltries of animals with which to decorate the potentates and beauties of the old world, or left their scalps to accentuate the figures of a warrior's dance, and their bodies to feed the wild beasts. What these frontiersmen endured is, fortunately, not to be estimated
Tippecanoe (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
y dough log-cabins baked and carried in procession, flanked by barrels of hard cider, to barbecues in the groves about Natchez, where rousing Whig speeches electrified the party. It was in praise of him, too, that the little children piped For Tippecanoe, and Tyler too, as they ran after the cortege. was directed by President Jefferson to make a treaty with the Sacs and Foxes, which was ratified in November, 1804, by which the United States bought the territory beginning on the Missouri River, n is fortified by the circumstances of his blood relationship to the Creeks, and by his absence when his brother, The Prophet, on November 7, 1811, to prevent General Harrison's advance on the principal town, made a night attack on his camp at Tippecanoe. This battle, or rather the fear of its renewal, caused the Indians hastily to abandon their permanent village. General Harrison, with his numerous wounded, returned to Vincennes, and the field of his recent occupations was unoccupied. O
Vincennes (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ttle, or rather the fear of its renewal, caused the Indians hastily to abandon their permanent village. General Harrison, with his numerous wounded, returned to Vincennes, and the field of his recent occupations was unoccupied. On the following June, of 1812, war was declared against England, and this increased the widespread and not unfounded fears of Indian invasion which existed in the valley of the Wabash. To protect Vincennes from a sudden assault, Captain Z. Taylor was ordered to Fort Harrison, a stockade on the river above Vincennes, and with his company of infantry, about fifty strong, made preparation to defend the place. He had not long to Vincennes, and with his company of infantry, about fifty strong, made preparation to defend the place. He had not long to wait. A large body of Indians, knowing the small size of the garrison, came, confidently counting on its capture; but, as it is a rule in their warfare to seek by stratagem to avoid equal risk and probable loss, they tried their various strategetic expedients, which were foiled by the sound judgment, vigilance, and courage of the
Fox River (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
in a direct line to the River Jeffreon, thirty miles from its mouth down to the Mississippi, thence up the Mississippi to the mouth of the Ouisconsin, and up that river for thirty-six miles in a direct line, thence by a direct line to where the Fox River leaves the Saukegan, thence down the Fox River to the Illinois, of which it is a tributary, and down the Illinois to the Mississippi. This magnificent body of land, which gave free passage across the country to the Mississippi from the easFox River to the Illinois, of which it is a tributary, and down the Illinois to the Mississippi. This magnificent body of land, which gave free passage across the country to the Mississippi from the east, watered by ever-flowing streams, where almost every cereal good for the food of man could be grown, was extorted from the Indians partly by treaty and partly by purchase, if $12,000 to be paid in yearly instalments of $I,000 per annum could be so called, when applied to the acquisition of 8,000,000 acres of land of unsurpassed fertility, extending from the upper end of Rock Island, from latitude 41° 15‘ to latitude 43° 15‘ on the Mississippi River. Mr. Davis wrote: The troubles on th<
Prairie Du Chien (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
e interlopers and committed outrages. The Governor promised, in answer to the memorial, to remove the Indians dead or alive. On May 28, 1831, the Governor wrote to General Gaines that he could bring his seven hundred militia troops to meet a supposititious Indian invasion of the territory of Illinois; but brave old General Gaines replied, the next day, that it was not necessary; he had ordered six companies of United States troops from Jefferson Barracks to Rock Island, and four from Prairie du Chien, and did not deem any greater force necessary. On the 7th of June, 1831, General Gaines held a council on Rock Island. Black Hawk and his band, in full panoply of war, singing their war-songs, to show they were not afraid, went to the appointed place, but refused to enter the council-room and occupy it with others not immediately interested in the business of the meeting. In compliance with their demand only a few were allowed to remain with Keokuk and Wapello. General Gaines
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...