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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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William S. Harney (search for this): chapter 11
eutenant Davis) as lieutenant of infantry, and I as aide-de-camp to General Henry Dodge, commanding the militia of Michigan Territory. I often accepted his invitation to partake of his hospitality, as well as that of General (then Captain) William S. Harney and Colonel Zachary Taylor, who often divided their rations with me, as we volunteers were frequently in want of suitable food. The regulars were much better provided for than we volunteers were at that time. They were not only furnished with better rations and more of them, but they had tents, while we had none; and I shall never forget the generous hospitality of Lieutenant Davis, Colonel Zachary Taylor, Captain W. S. Harney, and others of my brave and generous comrades of those days. In this campaign Lieutenant Davis was thrown with two remarkable men. Colonel Boone, a son of the celebrated Daniel Boone, and Major Jesse Bean, the courage and integrity of both of whom was above question. They were noted for their tho
the participation of his son probably did not prove a solace. He considered the Americans interlopers, himself a victim, and came out of prison far more bitter in his hostility than hitherto. A merciless beating, which was given to him while hunting on Two Rivers, by the white settlers, who suspected him of theft, rankled all his life. Another reason for his hatred to the Americans he has touchingly related himself. Black Hawk's last service under the British was in 1813, when Major Croghan repulsed the attack on Fort Stephenson made by Colonel Dixon and the British band. Previous to joining Colonel Dixon, Black Hawk had visited the lodge of an old friend, whose son he had adopted and taught to hunt. He was anxious that this youth should go with him and his band to join the British standard, but the father objected on the ground that he was dependent upon his son for game, and, moreover, that he did not wish him to fight against the Americans, who had always treated him k
. Nothing can be sold but such things as can be carried away. With such wide divergence of opinion, and so many causes of mutual irritation, affairs reached a point where some decisive step must be taken to avoid a conflict. Finally the whites took the matter in their own hands, and to expedite the removal of the band set fire to and burned about forty of the lodges. This and many other barbarities were practised upon the Indians. In 1829 Black Hawk appealed to Governor Coles and Judge Hill. He said: I then told them that Quash-qua-me and his party denied positively having ever sold my village, and that I had never known them to lie. I was determined to keep it in possession . .. Neither of them could do anything for us, but both evidently appeared very sorry .. I learned .. . . that our Great Father had exchanged a small strip of the land that was ceded by Quash-qua-me and his party with the Pottowatamies for a portion of their land near Chicago, and that the object of
Winfield Scott (search for this): chapter 11
ces took possession. There must have been many dramatic occurrences during this period, and the scene is peopled by the ghostly semblance of the men who have fought and died since that day. The Rev. Dr. Harsha, of Omaha, said: General Winfield Scott, when a young man, was stationed at Fort Snelling-at that day perhaps the remotest military outpost in the country. When the Black Hawk War was begun some Illinois militia companies proffered their services. Two lieutenants were sent by Scott to Dixon, Ill., to muster the new soldiers. One of these lieutenants was a very fascinating young man, of easy manners and affable disposition; the other was equally pleasant but extremely modest. On the morning when the muster was to take place, a tall, gawky, slab-sided, homely young man, dressed in a suit of blue jeans, presented himself to the lieutenants as the captain of the recruits, and was duly sworn in. The homely young man was Abraham Lincoln. The bashful lieutenant wa
has touchingly related himself. Black Hawk's last service under the British was in 1813, when Major Croghan repulsed the attack on Fort Stephenson made by Colonel Dixon and the British band. Previous to joining Colonel Dixon, Black Hawk had visited the lodge of an old friend, whose son he had adopted and taught to hunt. He wColonel Dixon, Black Hawk had visited the lodge of an old friend, whose son he had adopted and taught to hunt. He was anxious that this youth should go with him and his band to join the British standard, but the father objected on the ground that he was dependent upon his son for game, and, moreover, that he did not wish him to fight against the Americans, who had always treated him kindly. He had agreed to spend the following winter near a wh stream below the Des Moines, and intended to take his son with him. As Black Hawk was approaching his village on Rock River, after his campaign on the lakes with Dixon, he observed a smoke rising from a hollow in the bluff of the stream. He went to see who was there. Upon drawing near the fire he discovered a mat stretched, and
Rock Island, and four from Prairie du Chien, and did not deem any greater force necessary. On the 7th of June, 1831, General Gaines held a council on Rock Island. Black Hawk and his band, in full panoply of war, singing their war-songs, to show they were not afraid, went to the appointed place, but refused to enter the council-room and occupy it with others not immediately interested in the business of the meeting. In compliance with their demand only a few were allowed to remain with Keokuk and Wapello. General Gaines opened the council with a speech, in which he urged the band to remove west of the Mississippi. I replied, That we had never sold our country, . . . and we are determined to hold on to our village. The War Chief, apparently angry, rose and said, Who is Black? Who is Black Hawk? I responded, I am a Sac. My forefather was a Sac, and all the nation call me a Sac. Ask these young men, who have followed me in battle, and you will learn who Black Hawk is
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 11
Regiments of the United States Army, and he and his son Kanonecan, or the Youngest of the Thunders, with Red Bird's son, were only released because the witnesses could not be produced to prove their undoubted guilt. On this occasion General Albert Sidney Johnston was present, and gave a fine description of Red Bird, Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston, by his son who was somewhat over six feet in height, and of an ideal form. Although, after seeing the Sacs, Foxes, Menomonees, Sioux, eGeneral Albert Sidney Johnston, by his son who was somewhat over six feet in height, and of an ideal form. Although, after seeing the Sacs, Foxes, Menomonees, Sioux, etc., my romantic ideas of the Indian character had vanished, I must confess that I consider Red Bird one of the noblest and most dignified men I ever saw. When he gave himself up, he was dressed after the manner of the Sioux, of the Missouri, in a perfectly white hunting-shirt of deerskin, and leggings and moccasons of the same, with an elegant head-dress of feathers. He held a white flag in his right hand, and a beautifully ornamented pipe in the other. He said, I have offended, I sacrifice m
Zachary Taylor (search for this): chapter 11
s increased the widespread and not unfounded fears of Indian invasion which existed in the valley of the Wabash. To protect Vincennes from a sudden assault, Captain Z. Taylor was ordered to Fort Harrison, a stockade on the river above Vincennes, and with his company of infantry, about fifty strong, made preparation to defend the ptia of Michigan Territory. I often accepted his invitation to partake of his hospitality, as well as that of General (then Captain) William S. Harney and Colonel Zachary Taylor, who often divided their rations with me, as we volunteers were frequently in want of suitable food. The regulars were much better provided for than nished with better rations and more of them, but they had tents, while we had none; and I shall never forget the generous hospitality of Lieutenant Davis, Colonel Zachary Taylor, Captain W. S. Harney, and others of my brave and generous comrades of those days. In this campaign Lieutenant Davis was thrown with two remarkable me
to settle upon it. Nothing can be sold but such things as can be carried away. With such wide divergence of opinion, and so many causes of mutual irritation, affairs reached a point where some decisive step must be taken to avoid a conflict. Finally the whites took the matter in their own hands, and to expedite the removal of the band set fire to and burned about forty of the lodges. This and many other barbarities were practised upon the Indians. In 1829 Black Hawk appealed to Governor Coles and Judge Hill. He said: I then told them that Quash-qua-me and his party denied positively having ever sold my village, and that I had never known them to lie. I was determined to keep it in possession . .. Neither of them could do anything for us, but both evidently appeared very sorry .. I learned .. . . that our Great Father had exchanged a small strip of the land that was ceded by Quash-qua-me and his party with the Pottowatamies for a portion of their land near Chicago, and th
that the hill on which the engagement took place has ever since been called the Butte des Morts. This was modified by an old frontier settler, Mrs. Arndt, into Betty Mores. From this and various other causes the two tribes were so depleted that they joined forces, and, though still keeping their community independence, became practically one tribe. The subsequent war with the Six Nations left them too weak to stand alone. La Houton speaks of a Sac village on Fox River in 1689, and Father Hennepin, in r680, speaks of them as Ortagamies, and says they were residents of the Bay of Puants, now Green Bay. Major Forsyth said: More than a century ago all the country commencing above Rock River and running down the Mississippi to the mouth of the Ohio, up that river to the mouth of the Warbash, thence down the Miami of the lake some distance, thence north to the St. Joseph's and Chicago, also the country lying south of the Des Moines, down perhaps to the Mississippi, was inhabited b
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