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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Jesse Bean (search for this): chapter 11
s thrown with two remarkable men. Colonel Boone, a son of the celebrated Daniel Boone, and Major Jesse Bean, the courage and integrity of both of whom was above question. They were noted for their tny one else could have been. On being questioned he simply said, the water must be there. Jesse Bean was a man of a different mould; but though he had not received the educational advantages of Cs natural capacity had made up for the deficiency. Lieutenant Davis used often to talk to Major Bean about the phenomena of nature, and tell him the scientific theory of cause and effect, and received an ample compensation for what he imparted, for Major Bean was a shrewd man and close observer of human nature. One day, however, Major Bean's faith in the subaltern's learning was seriously shMajor Bean's faith in the subaltern's learning was seriously shaken. Lieutenant Davis was explaining the laws that governed the solar system, the Major looked doubtful and said: I did not think, Lieutenant, that you would try to make fun of an old man. As for th
s heart would be acknowledged superior as a brave. For some of these atrocious acts Black Hawk and his sons, with Red Bird and several of the leaders engaged with him, were given up by the Winnebagoes in answer to the demand of General Atkinson h, and Sixth Regiments of the United States Army, and he and his son Kanonecan, or the Youngest of the Thunders, with Red Bird's son, were only released because the witnesses could not be produced to prove their undoubted guilt. On this occasion General Albert Sidney Johnston was present, and gave a fine description of Red Bird, Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston, by his son who was somewhat over six feet in height, and of an ideal form. Although, after seeing the Sacs, Foxes, Menomonees, Sioux, etc., my romantic ideas of the Indian character had vanished, I must confess that I consider Red Bird one of the noblest and most dignified men I ever saw. When he gave himself up, he was dressed after the manner of the Sioux, of the Miss
Betty Mores (search for this): chapter 11
e tribes eventually became amalgamated; they were originally from the St. Lawrence River. The Foxes first settled at Green Bay, and the river near which they made their abode still bears their name. There they sustained a signal defeat by the united forces of the friendly Indians and French troops, and the slaughter was so great that the hill on which the engagement took place has ever since been called the Butte des Morts. This was modified by an old frontier settler, Mrs. Arndt, into Betty Mores. From this and various other causes the two tribes were so depleted that they joined forces, and, though still keeping their community independence, became practically one tribe. The subsequent war with the Six Nations left them too weak to stand alone. La Houton speaks of a Sac village on Fox River in 1689, and Father Hennepin, in r680, speaks of them as Ortagamies, and says they were residents of the Bay of Puants, now Green Bay. Major Forsyth said: More than a century ago all
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 11
titude 43° 15‘ on the Mississippi River. Mr. Davis wrote: The troubles on the Indian fronti inspire confidence he took with him only Lieutenant Davis of his staff, an interpreter named Paquetess and that of other Indian women attracted Mr. Davis's attention, and the majesty of her mien impatement seemed to mollify the old princess. Mr. Davis said his sympathy for her, in conjunction wi the President of the Confederate States, Jefferson Davis. Dr. Harsha was in Carter Brothers' bs it was administered by Jefferson Davis. Mr. Davis remembered swearing in some volunteers, butociated in the famous Black Hawk War, he (Lieutenant Davis) as lieutenant of infantry, and I as aide never forget the generous hospitality of Lieutenant Davis, Colonel Zachary Taylor, Captain W. S. Harades of those days. In this campaign Lieutenant Davis was thrown with two remarkable men. Coloncapacity had made up for the deficiency. Lieutenant Davis used often to talk to Major Bean about t[3 more...]
nxious that this youth should go with him and his band to join the British standard, but the father objected on the ground that he was dependent upon his son for game, and, moreover, that he did not wish him to fight against the Americans, who had always treated him kindly. He had agreed to spend the following winter near a white settlement, upon Salt River, one of the tributaries of the Mississippi which enter that stream below the Des Moines, and intended to take his son with him. As Black Hawk was approaching his village on Rock River, after his campaign on the lakes with Dixon, he observed a smoke rising from a hollow in the bluff of the stream. He went to see who was there. Upon drawing near the fire he discovered a mat stretched, and an old man of sorrowful aspect sitting under it alone, and evidently humbling himself before the Great Spirit by fasting and prayer. It proved to be his old friend, the father of his adopted son. Black Hawk seated himself beside him and inquired
Francisco De Cartabana (search for this): chapter 11
horities at St. Genevieve for assistance. He at last yielded unwillingly to their demands, and had, on May I, 1779, returned with sixty men, who were in the town when the attack was made. It was sudden and violent, and about twenty citizens were killed in the field before they could regain the fort. Sylvio Francisco de Cartabana, the Spanish Governor, had gone to St. Genevieve and brought the militia from that post to aid in the defence of the town. When the attack commenced neither Cartabana nor his promised force were forthcoming, but lay hidden in a garret until the foe had retired; but the citizens stationed fifteen men at each gate and scattered the rest of their force along the line. They answered the irregular fire of the Indians by grape-shot from their few artillery guns, the intrenchments were formidable, and the cannon, to which they were not accustomed, completed the discomfiture of the attacking Indians. The Lieutenant-Governor, from illness, was not able to walk
A. C. Dodge (search for this): chapter 11
then gave the additional testimony that he had often heard Mr. Lincoln say that the first time that he had ever taken the oath of allegiance to the United States it was administered by Jefferson Davis. Mr. Davis remembered swearing in some volunteers, but could not substantiate what seems a probable story. Goaded by a sense of injury, Black Hawk and his band crossed the river several times, making predatory incursions either upon the friendly Indians or the whites. Of this General A. C. Dodge wrote: In 1832 we became associated in the famous Black Hawk War, he (Lieutenant Davis) as lieutenant of infantry, and I as aide-de-camp to General Henry Dodge, commanding the militia of Michigan Territory. I often accepted his invitation to partake of his hospitality, as well as that of General (then Captain) William S. Harney and Colonel Zachary Taylor, who often divided their rations with me, as we volunteers were frequently in want of suitable food. The regulars were mu
The council broke up without any definite agreement, but in a letter to General George W. Jones, Mr. Davis said, many years afterward: It was in consequence of the council held at Rock Island that Black Hawk went to the west side of the Mississippi. When, in 1832, he returned to the east side of the river, it was regarded as a violation of the agreement of the previous year, and as indicating a purpose to repeat his claim to the village of Rock River. This led to the expedition under Stillman, and that inaugurated the war of 1832. In 1831 the Sauks sent a war party against the Sioux, and this breach of peace they feared would bring upon them punishment by the United States; such, at least, was then understood to be the cause of their abandonment of their settlement at the lead mines of Dubuque. This encounter between General Gaines and Black Hawk is a reminder of one in which the general was equally unfortunate in his intercourse with the dignitaries of the Sac nation. T
tified, followed by massacres of the most cruel character, in which every imaginable atrocity was inflicted by the Indians upon their unhappy captives, General William Henry Harrison The same in whose honor I had in childhood seen many dough log-cabins baked and carried in procession, flanked by barrels of hard cider, to barbecues in the groves about Natchez, where rousing Whig speeches electrified the party. It was in praise of him, too, that the little children piped For Tippecanoe, and Tyler too, as they ran after the cortege. was directed by President Jefferson to make a treaty with the Sacs and Foxes, which was ratified in November, 1804, by which the United States bought the territory beginning on the Missouri River, thence in a direct line to the River Jeffreon, thirty miles from its mouth down to the Mississippi, thence up the Mississippi to the mouth of the Ouisconsin, and up that river for thirty-six miles in a direct line, thence by a direct line to where the Fox River l
Chapter 11: the Black Hawk War. The events of this period, called the Black Hawk War, have become so shrouded in the mists of time that a short statement of the causes will not seem inappropriate. The name Sauke, now abbreviated to Sac, means yellow earth; Musquakee, now Fox, red earth. These two warlike tribes eventually became amalgamated; they were originally from the St. Lawrence River. The Foxes first settled at Green Bay, and the river near which they made their abode still bears their name. There they sustained a signal defeat by the united forces of the friendly Indians and French troops, and the slaughter was so great that the hill on which the engagement took place has ever since been called the Butte des Morts. This was modified by an old frontier settler, Mrs. Arndt, into Betty Mores. From this and various other causes the two tribes were so depleted that they joined forces, and, though still keeping their community independence, became practically one tri
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