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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Chapter 17: Begins his political life, 1843. Canvass as elector for Polk and Dallas. In 1843, said Mr. Davis, in a brief autobiographical sketch, dictated to a friend during the last month of his life, for a new Biographical Cyclopaedia, I, for the first time, took part in the political life of the country. Next year I1843, said Mr. Davis, in a brief autobiographical sketch, dictated to a friend during the last month of his life, for a new Biographical Cyclopaedia, I, for the first time, took part in the political life of the country. Next year I was chosen one of the Presidential electors at large of the State, and in the succeeding year was elected to Congress, taking my seat in the House of Representatives in December, 1845. The proposition to terminate the joint occupancy of Oregon and the reformation of the tariff were the two questions arousing most public attentiotary education enabled me to take a somewhat prominent part. In this brief sketch Mr. Davis did not deem it necessary to state what part he took in politics in 1843. In that year he was urged to become a candidate of the Democratic, or States' Rights party, for the State legislature, as the representative of Warren County, an
his Autobiography (vol. i., page 148), relative to the Mississippi bonds, repudiated mainly by Mr. Jefferson Davis. He spoke in terms of still severer censure of the late Robert J. Walker, who had been sent by the United States Government to propagate the same calumny, while their financial agent in Europe during the war, although Mr. Walker was personally familiar with all the facts of the transaction, and was himself Senator from Mississippi at the time. In the summer of the same year (1844) Mr. Davis was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention which assembled at Jackson to organize the gubernatorial canvass and to appoint delegates to the National Convention. Here he made his first conspicuous appearance as a coming leader in the party. Van Buren was the choice of the majority. A motion was made to instruct the delegates to support Mr. Van Buren in the Convention as long as there was any reasonable prospect of his selection. Mr. Davis offered an amendment instructin
: Not only was it Mr. Davis's first appearance in the political arena, as a candidate for the legislature, subsequent to the reproduction of the bonds, but he never at any time, before or afterward, held any civil office-legislative, executive, or judicial in the State government. Furthermore, that his supposed sympathy with the advocates of the payment of the debt by the State was actually (although ineffectually) employed among the repudiators as an objection to his election to Congress in 1845. The idea of attaching any share of the responsibility to him for the repudiation of the bonds was of later origin. In his latter years he felt and sometimes expressed strong indignation at the remark of General Scott in his Autobiography (vol. i., page 148), relative to the Mississippi bonds, repudiated mainly by Mr. Jefferson Davis. He spoke in terms of still severer censure of the late Robert J. Walker, who had been sent by the United States Government to propagate the same calumny, wh
December, 1845 AD (search for this): chapter 17
r 17: Begins his political life, 1843. Canvass as elector for Polk and Dallas. In 1843, said Mr. Davis, in a brief autobiographical sketch, dictated to a friend during the last month of his life, for a new Biographical Cyclopaedia, I, for the first time, took part in the political life of the country. Next year I was chosen one of the Presidential electors at large of the State, and in the succeeding year was elected to Congress, taking my seat in the House of Representatives in December, 1845. The proposition to terminate the joint occupancy of Oregon and the reformation of the tariff were the two questions arousing most public attention at that time, and I took an active part in the discussion, especially in that of the first. During this period hostilities with Mexico commenced, and in the legislation which that conflict rendered necessary, my military education enabled me to take a somewhat prominent part. In this brief sketch Mr. Davis did not deem it necessary to s
Martin Van Buren (search for this): chapter 17
with all the facts of the transaction, and was himself Senator from Mississippi at the time. In the summer of the same year (1844) Mr. Davis was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention which assembled at Jackson to organize the gubernatorial canvass and to appoint delegates to the National Convention. Here he made his first conspicuous appearance as a coming leader in the party. Van Buren was the choice of the majority. A motion was made to instruct the delegates to support Mr. Van Buren in the Convention as long as there was any reasonable prospect of his selection. Mr. Davis offered an amendment instructing them to support John C. Calhoun as their second choice. In advocating this amendment he eulogized Mr. Calhoun and his principles in a speech of such force and eloquence that he was unanimously chosen an elector. As this was the only occasion on which I was ever a candidate for the legislature of Mississippi, it may be seen how unfounded was the allegation that at
John C. Calhoun (search for this): chapter 17
as the choice of the majority. A motion was made to instruct the delegates to support Mr. Van Buren in the Convention as long as there was any reasonable prospect of his selection. Mr. Davis offered an amendment instructing them to support John C. Calhoun as their second choice. In advocating this amendment he eulogized Mr. Calhoun and his principles in a speech of such force and eloquence that he was unanimously chosen an elector. As this was the only occasion on which I was ever a candida Mr. Davis offered an amendment instructing them to support John C. Calhoun as their second choice. In advocating this amendment he eulogized Mr. Calhoun and his principles in a speech of such force and eloquence that he was unanimously chosen an elector. As this was the only occasion on which I was ever a candidate for the legislature of Mississippi, it may be seen how unfounded was the allegation that attributed to me any part in the legislative enactment known as the Act of repudiation.
George Mifflin Dallas (search for this): chapter 17
Chapter 17: Begins his political life, 1843. Canvass as elector for Polk and Dallas. In 1843, said Mr. Davis, in a brief autobiographical sketch, dictated to a friend during the last month of his life, for a new Biographical Cyclopaedia, I, for the first time, took part in the political life of the country. Next year I was chosen one of the Presidential electors at large of the State, and in the succeeding year was elected to Congress, taking my seat in the House of Representatives in December, 1845. The proposition to terminate the joint occupancy of Oregon and the reformation of the tariff were the two questions arousing most public attention at that time, and I took an active part in the discussion, especially in that of the first. During this period hostilities with Mexico commenced, and in the legislation which that conflict rendered necessary, my military education enabled me to take a somewhat prominent part. In this brief sketch Mr. Davis did not deem it neces
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 17
pressed strong indignation at the remark of General Scott in his Autobiography (vol. i., page 148), relative to the Mississippi bonds, repudiated mainly by Mr. Jefferson Davis. He spoke in terms of still severer censure of the late Robert J. Walker, who had been sent by the United States Government to propagate the same calumny, ker was personally familiar with all the facts of the transaction, and was himself Senator from Mississippi at the time. In the summer of the same year (1844) Mr. Davis was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention which assembled at Jackson to organize the gubernatorial canvass and to appoint delegates to the National Convemajority. A motion was made to instruct the delegates to support Mr. Van Buren in the Convention as long as there was any reasonable prospect of his selection. Mr. Davis offered an amendment instructing them to support John C. Calhoun as their second choice. In advocating this amendment he eulogized Mr. Calhoun and his principle
Joseph E. Davis (search for this): chapter 17
Begins his political life, 1843. Canvass as elector for Polk and Dallas. In 1843, said Mr. Davis, in a brief autobiographical sketch, dictated to a friend during the last month of his life, fy, my military education enabled me to take a somewhat prominent part. In this brief sketch Mr. Davis did not deem it necessary to state what part he took in politics in 1843. In that year he waCounty, and with the expressed expectation of leading a forlorn hope. In a private memorandum Mr. Davis thus describes this, his first political campaign. The canvass had advanced to a period and intimate following, aided by such generous applause, would bring out all there was in him. Mr. Davis continued: The result of the election, as anticipated, was my defeat. Referring to this period a writer in the New Orleans Times-Democrat says truly: Not only was it Mr. Davis's first appearance in the political arena, as a candidate for the legislature, subsequent to the reproduction
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 17
Chapter 17: Begins his political life, 1843. Canvass as elector for Polk and Dallas. In 1843, said Mr. Davis, in a brief autobiographical sketch, dictated to a friend during the last month of his life, for a new Biographical Cyclopaedia, I, for the first time, took part in the political life of the country. Next year I was chosen one of the Presidential electors at large of the State, and in the succeeding year was elected to Congress, taking my seat in the House of Representatives in December, 1845. The proposition to terminate the joint occupancy of Oregon and the reformation of the tariff were the two questions arousing most public attention at that time, and I took an active part in the discussion, especially in that of the first. During this period hostilities with Mexico commenced, and in the legislation which that conflict rendered necessary, my military education enabled me to take a somewhat prominent part. In this brief sketch Mr. Davis did not deem it neces
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