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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
s. As an association they were rich. Individually, they were vowed to poverty and self-abnegation. They were diligent in the care, both spiritual and material, of their parishioners' wants. When I entered the school, a large majority of the boys belonged to the Roman Catholic Church. After a short time I was the only Protestant boy remaining, and also the smallest boy in the school. From whatever reason, the priests were particularly kind to me-Father Wallace, afterward Bishop of Nashville, treated me with the fondness of a near relative. As the charge has been frequently made that it is the practice of the priests in all their schools to endeavor to proselyte the boys confided to them, I may mention an incident which is, in my case at least, a refutation. At that period of my life I knew, as a theologian, little of the true creed of Christianity, and under the influences which surrounded me I thought it would be well that I should become a Catholic, and went to the ve
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
profession; that he agreed to preach for a stipulated salary; but, unless he thought he was doing good, which the absence of the people showed to be doubtful, he was neither willing to preach nor to receive the salary. He continued solely under the pay received as principal of the Academy. He was a quiet, just man, and I am sure he taught me more in the time I was with him than I ever learned from any one else. He married in our county, and after the death of his wife returned to Massachusetts; but, whether he acquired new tastes during his residence in the South, or from whatever reason, he returned after some years to New Orleans, where he was Superintendent of the Public Schools when I last heard from him. I was very much gratified to learn that he remembered me favorably, and mentioned it to one of his pupils who had been named for me. He was the first of a new class of teachers in our neighborhood, and was followed by classical scholars who raised the standard of ability
Adams (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
could repeat all the rules; but if you asked him to explain why, when he added up a column of figures, he set down the right and carried the left-hand figure, he could give the rule, but no reason for it. And I am not sure that, as a general thing, the teacher could have explained it to him. The log-cabin schools were not public schools in the sense in which that term is used to-day — for the teacher was supported by the fees charged every pupil. I was next sent to school in Adams County, Miss., to what was called, and is still known as, Jefferson College. I was then about ten years of age. The principal was a man of great learning, qualified to teach pupils more advanced than those he received. There was an adjacent department (over which a Scotchman presided) to teach the smaller children, and his methods were those of the earlier times — to prescribe the lesson and whip any boy who did not know it. The path along which I travelled to the school-house passed by the
Bardstown (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
l, and far from home, without my mother's knowledge or consent, that she became very impatient for my return. Neither then, nor in the many years of my life, have I ceased to cherish a tender memory of the loving care of that mother, in whom there was so much for me to admire and nothing to remember save good. Charles B. Green, a young Mississippian, who was studying law in Kentucky, had acted as my guardian when I was at school there, and he returned with me to Mississippi. We left Bardstown to go home by steamer from Louisville; for, then, steam-boats had been put on the river, At that time, as well as I can remember, there were three steam-boats on the Mississippi — the Volcano, the Vesuvius, and the Aetna. We embarked on the Aetna. A steam-boat was then a matter of such great curiosity that many persons got on board to ride a few miles down the river, where they were to be landed, to return in carriages. The captain of the Aetna, Robinson De Hart, had been a sailor
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ent so young to school, and far from home, without my mother's knowledge or consent, that she became very impatient for my return. Neither then, nor in the many years of my life, have I ceased to cherish a tender memory of the loving care of that mother, in whom there was so much for me to admire and nothing to remember save good. Charles B. Green, a young Mississippian, who was studying law in Kentucky, had acted as my guardian when I was at school there, and he returned with me to Mississippi. We left Bardstown to go home by steamer from Louisville; for, then, steam-boats had been put on the river, At that time, as well as I can remember, there were three steam-boats on the Mississippi — the Volcano, the Vesuvius, and the Aetna. We embarked on the Aetna. A steam-boat was then a matter of such great curiosity that many persons got on board to ride a few miles down the river, where they were to be landed, to return in carriages. The captain of the Aetna, Robinson De Ha
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
er's knowledge or consent, that she became very impatient for my return. Neither then, nor in the many years of my life, have I ceased to cherish a tender memory of the loving care of that mother, in whom there was so much for me to admire and nothing to remember save good. Charles B. Green, a young Mississippian, who was studying law in Kentucky, had acted as my guardian when I was at school there, and he returned with me to Mississippi. We left Bardstown to go home by steamer from Louisville; for, then, steam-boats had been put on the river, At that time, as well as I can remember, there were three steam-boats on the Mississippi — the Volcano, the Vesuvius, and the Aetna. We embarked on the Aetna. A steam-boat was then a matter of such great curiosity that many persons got on board to ride a few miles down the river, where they were to be landed, to return in carriages. The captain of the Aetna, Robinson De Hart, had been a sailor in his earlier days, and he always us
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
that mother, in whom there was so much for me to admire and nothing to remember save good. Charles B. Green, a young Mississippian, who was studying law in Kentucky, had acted as my guardian when I was at school there, and he returned with me to Mississippi. We left Bardstown to go home by steamer from Louisville; for, thenity in which he lived. His admonitions to his children were rather suggestive than dictatorial. I remember a case in point, which happened after my return from Kentucky, while I was at the County Academy. A task had been assigned me in excess of my power to memorize. I stated the case to the teacher, but he persisted in imome and went daily from my father's house to the school-house until I was sufficiently advanced to be sent to the college known as the Transylvania University of Kentucky. At the head of the County Academy was a scholarly man named John A. Shaw, from Boston. He took on himself, also, the duty of preaching every Sunday; but as
George Wilson (search for this): chapter 2
ear relative. As the charge has been frequently made that it is the practice of the priests in all their schools to endeavor to proselyte the boys confided to them, I may mention an incident which is, in my case at least, a refutation. At that period of my life I knew, as a theologian, little of the true creed of Christianity, and under the influences which surrounded me I thought it would be well that I should become a Catholic, and went to the venerable head of the establishment, Father Wilson, whom I found in his room partaking of his frugal meal, and stated to him my wish. He received me kindly, handed me a biscuit and a bit of cheese, and told me that for the present I had better take some Catholic food. I was so small at this time that one of the good old priests had a little bed put in his room for me. There was an organized revolt among the boys one day, and this priest was their especial objective point. They persuaded me to promise to blow out the light which al
Robinson De Hart (search for this): chapter 2
Mississippi. We left Bardstown to go home by steamer from Louisville; for, then, steam-boats had been put on the river, At that time, as well as I can remember, there were three steam-boats on the Mississippi — the Volcano, the Vesuvius, and the Aetna. We embarked on the Aetna. A steam-boat was then a matter of such great curiosity that many persons got on board to ride a few miles down the river, where they were to be landed, to return in carriages. The captain of the Aetna, Robinson De Hart, had been a sailor in his earlier days, and he always used a speaking-trumpet and spy-glass when landing the boat to take wood. Our voyage was slow and uneventful, and we reached home in safety. I had been absent two years, and my brother Isaac accompanied me home, stopped at the village near my father's house, and told me to go on and conceal my identity to see if they would know me. I found my dear old mother sitting near the door, and, walking up with an assumed air to hide a th
William Wallace (search for this): chapter 2
ves, flour-mills, flocks, and herds. As an association they were rich. Individually, they were vowed to poverty and self-abnegation. They were diligent in the care, both spiritual and material, of their parishioners' wants. When I entered the school, a large majority of the boys belonged to the Roman Catholic Church. After a short time I was the only Protestant boy remaining, and also the smallest boy in the school. From whatever reason, the priests were particularly kind to me-Father Wallace, afterward Bishop of Nashville, treated me with the fondness of a near relative. As the charge has been frequently made that it is the practice of the priests in all their schools to endeavor to proselyte the boys confided to them, I may mention an incident which is, in my case at least, a refutation. At that period of my life I knew, as a theologian, little of the true creed of Christianity, and under the influences which surrounded me I thought it would be well that I should beco
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