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Brierfield (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
aw her out, did not answer them. At last she flushed fiery red, and said, My name is McGruggy, an‘ I ain't ashamed of it, an‘ I am goin‘ to Cincinnatta, and I don't see but what I am good enough for that man to tell me whar he is a goin‘ --then, with a sniff, she turned to her little tow-headed daughter and said, Si-i-s, Davis ain't a aristocratic name, no-how. However, later, our mutual suffering brought us nearer together, and she gave me some fine apricot seed, which grew and bore at Brierfield for nine years under the name of The pilot's wife. Eventually a very small boat came alongside of ours with great puffing and ringing of bells; we were transferred to her as of lighter draft. She puffed and steamed all night, and in the morning had only reached the south bank, in sight of the boat we had left. Then her wheels ceased to revolve and we had to debark and continue our journey, at the imminent risk of our lives, on a rough wood-sled with oaken runners, sitting on our trunks
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ople all looked to these weary country girls, who had never seen anything more worldly than their domestic mothers! There was Mrs. Myra Clarke Gaines, then not more than ankle-deep in her great suit. The beautiful Mrs. Ashleigh, afterward Mrs. John J. Crittenden; Apollonia Jagello, a Polish heroine, with a heavy mustache and a voice to match; Mrs. James Gordon Bennett; Mr. Calhoun and his family, just leaving for the house in which they were to live on Missouri Avenue; Mr. McDuffie, of South Carolina, formed in the same physical mould with Mr. Calhoun, but bearing aloft a cavalier's head, and who, like Launcelot, though a doughty and most valiant knight, was not averse to dalliance for awhile with the pleasures of society; Judge Douglas, the impersonation of the talent and force that westward took its way. Judge Woodbury of the Supreme Court, a profound thinker, a faithful friend, and tender father and husband, whose brilliant eyes and gentle manners charmed me from the first, was
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 20
reeable and kind. It is strange in the present memory of past events to think how many people were assembled there that winter who more or less entered our after-lives and were important factors therein. Mr. Seddon was there with his handsome bride. Colonel, afterward General Dix, was then a Senator from New York, and was one of the distinguished few who kept house. Mr. Lincoln, I have heard, was a member of Congress that session. Mr. Slidell passed through Washington en route from Mexico, where he had been on some diplomatic mission, and we called to see him. When Mrs. Slidell entered the room her beauty, which was of the best creole type, impressed us most agreeably. Mr. Slidell was also a man to be noticeable anywhere. He had an air of quiet refinement that was very attractive, and his features were regularly handsome; but he looked, and indeed was, so much older than his wife that the contrast was sharp. Her features were regular, her figure noble, and she looked so di
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
e; but it soon changed into a plain and stronger cast of what he considered to be, and doubtless was, the higher kind of oratory. His extempore addresses are models of grace and ready command of language. The next day we took a boat for Wheeling, which was the route usually pursued by persons going North at that season. Otherwise, Congressmen went by river to New Orleans, and by rail, river, and stages through Alabama and Georgia until they reached Charleston, and there took ship for Norfolk. This was called the Southern route, and consumed five days and nights of hard travel. There were no sleeping cars, and the only way to get rest, if greatly fatigued, was to stop overnight at some miserable little inn and lose a day, or go on and trust to a good constitution to bear one through. This latter mode we preferred. The river soon began to be full of floating ice, which crunched alarmingly against the sides of the boat, and, after making very little headway, we ascended the
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 20
be permitted to perpetuate such eloquence! We then prepared our house for a long absence, and commenced our journey to Washington, taking with us our niece, Miss Mary Bradford. We reached Vicksburg in the afternoon of the night that was to bringse cold, during which we were obliged to eat our life-long supply of worst with maple syrup for a condiment, we reached Washington more dead than alive. Under all these disadvantages Mr. Davis was cheerful; always ready with some pleasant story, with fatigue, but trying our best to command his respect by being stoical, though bruised black and blue, we arrived in Washington, and took temporary lodgings at the National Hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue. How grand and blase the people all lookeed few who kept house. Mr. Lincoln, I have heard, was a member of Congress that session. Mr. Slidell passed through Washington en route from Mexico, where he had been on some diplomatic mission, and we called to see him. When Mrs. Slidell entered
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
house near by on the Avenue, and joined a Congressional mess, that is, a boardinghouse into which a certain number of men holding the same political faith agreed to go for the session, reserving the right, if the equivalent was paid, to exclude any objectionable person. In our mess were the two members from Mississippi, and their pleasant, kindly wives, Mr. Jacob and Mrs. Thompson, and Mr. Steven Adams with his wife; General Jones, of Iowa, was there for awhile; and a Mr. Foster, of Pennsylvania, and several others, with the memory of whom forty-three years have played sad havoc. Robert Dale Owen, the younger, boarded quite near us, with Daniel S. Dickenson, of New York, who was as cheerful and enthusiastic as a boy; he came to us almost every evening for what he called a little confab. Now began Mr. Davis's earnest work. He visited very little, studied until two or three o'clock in the morning, and, with my assistance, did all his writing. Between us we franked all the doc
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
at the imminent risk of our lives, on a rough wood-sled with oaken runners, sitting on our trunks. The member from South Mississippi, Colonel Robert N. Roberts, a kind and very shrewd and observant old gentleman, much respected and entirely trusted by his constituents in Mississippi, was our only companion. The narrow road, slanting sidewise, covered with frozen snow, ran about half-way up the side of a mountain on one side, and sloped on the other steeply to the river. When a quarter of th the right, if the equivalent was paid, to exclude any objectionable person. In our mess were the two members from Mississippi, and their pleasant, kindly wives, Mr. Jacob and Mrs. Thompson, and Mr. Steven Adams with his wife; General Jones, of latter peculiarity, which occurred very soon after our arrival, always provoked a smile. One of the Senators from Mississippi, Mr. Jesse Speight, was a singularly handsome man, and no respecter of persons. He did not hesitate to call Mr. Cass
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
te, and poetry and fiction were pressed from his crowded memory into service; but it soon changed into a plain and stronger cast of what he considered to be, and doubtless was, the higher kind of oratory. His extempore addresses are models of grace and ready command of language. The next day we took a boat for Wheeling, which was the route usually pursued by persons going North at that season. Otherwise, Congressmen went by river to New Orleans, and by rail, river, and stages through Alabama and Georgia until they reached Charleston, and there took ship for Norfolk. This was called the Southern route, and consumed five days and nights of hard travel. There were no sleeping cars, and the only way to get rest, if greatly fatigued, was to stop overnight at some miserable little inn and lose a day, or go on and trust to a good constitution to bear one through. This latter mode we preferred. The river soon began to be full of floating ice, which crunched alarmingly against th
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
It was taken, however, in good-humor by the Senator, and never mentioned without a laugh by either side, though while writing his reply, my husband was in no pacific mood. It bore the relation to us then that a telegram at dawn of day about a trifle does now. A propos of telegrams, I find in an old letter at this time this announcement: We went down to-day to see Mr. Morse's machine make the wires talk, and repeat messages from one town to another. There are small wires stretched from Baltimore to this place, and they are brought into the windows of a house on the Avenue. Inside of a little stall a man sits and sends messages and receives the answers. I think it is a trick, but paid my two-bits (twenty-five cents) to get a message that it was a fine day. From another letter of 1850 I cull this sentence: There is a machine in town, I hear, that stitches like the hand-work. That was the description of the now universal and indispensable sewing-machine.
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ot to look at him while speaking, so I heard only his beautiful voice, expressive of respectful regard in every tone. He greeted the great statesman with a few words of personal and general welcome, and then began, in rather a slow manner, evidently trying to remember the aforesaid speech ; but as he progressed his voice grew round and clearer until it filled the large hall to the echo. Without pausing for a word, he passed in rapid review the tariff, the currency, the probable addition of Texas to the Union-which was then an exciting theme — as there were many opponents of the measure. He did not even look askance at nullification, or internal improvements by the General Government, but made a strong appeal for strict construction of the Constitution, and an eloquent statement of the power, the glory, and the danger of our country; a short review of Mr. Calhoun's career as Secretary of War, Senator, and Vice-President; and then came to the home-stretch with State rights sails all
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