hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 656 14 Browse Search
United States (United States) 252 0 Browse Search
Zachary Taylor 164 8 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 140 0 Browse Search
V. H. Davis 126 0 Browse Search
John C. Calhoun 115 1 Browse Search
John Davis 115 1 Browse Search
Sidney Webster 112 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 112 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 84 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 280 total hits in 66 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
he gunners were cut down at their pieces, the commanding officer was captured, and the infantry soon thereafter made the victory decisive. The enemy's loss, in the two battles, was estimated at i,000; Taylor's killed, 49. The Mexicans precipitately recrossed the Rio Grande, completely routed, leaving on the field the usual marks of defeat and rout. He then proceeded to Fort Brown. During his absence it had been heavily bombarded, and the commander, Major Brown, had been killed. On the 28th the House resolved itself into Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union, to take up the joint resolutions, tendering the thanks of Congress to General Taylor and the army of occupation for recent brilliant services on the Rio Grande. On May 29th a skirmish opened between two men, for each of whom the future had in store the highest political responsibilities and honors. These men came from the same section. They coincided on the leading war issues; but their early associations a
Chapter 21: Mr. Davis's first session in Congress. Mr. Davis took his seat as a member of the House of Representatives on Monday, December 8, 1845. On the 29th of the month he offered two resolutions — the first: That the Committee on Military Affairs be instructed to inquire into the expediency of converting a portion of the forts of the United States into schools for military instruction, on the basis of substituting their present garrisons of enlisted men by detachments furnished from each State of our Union, in ratio of their several representatives in the Congress of the United States. The second: Instructing the Committee on the Post-office and Post-roads to inquire into the expediency of establishing a direct daily mail route from Montgomery, Ala., to Jackson, Miss. With the presentation of these resolutions Mr. Davis for a time seemed satisfied. He remained in his seat, however, a keen observer of the forms of parliamentary procedure, and made
d be held, to which General Taylor assented. At the meeting it was developed that the prevalent opinion was in favor of falling back to Point Isabel, there to instruct and wait for reinforcements. After listening to a full expression of views, the General announced: I shall go to Fort Brown or stay in my shoes, a Western expression equivalent to die in the attempt. He then notified the officers to return to their commands and prepare to attack the enemy at dawn of day. In the morning of May 8th the advance was made by columns until the enemy's batteries opened, when line of battle was formed, and our artillery, inferior in number but superior otherwise, was brought fully into action, and dispersed the most of the enemy's cavalry. The chaparral-dense copses of thorn bushes-served both to conceal the position of his troops and to impede the movements of the attacking force. The action continued until night, when the enemy retired and General Taylor bivouacked on the field. Early
ade by columns until the enemy's batteries opened, when line of battle was formed, and our artillery, inferior in number but superior otherwise, was brought fully into action, and dispersed the most of the enemy's cavalry. The chaparral-dense copses of thorn bushes-served both to conceal the position of his troops and to impede the movements of the attacking force. The action continued until night, when the enemy retired and General Taylor bivouacked on the field. Early in the morning of May 9th General Taylor resumed his forward march, and in the afternoon encountered the enemy in a strong position, with artillery advantageously posted. Taylor's infantry pushed through the chaparral lining both sides of the road, and drove the enemy's infantry before them; but the batteries held their position, and were so fatally used that it was an absolute necessity to capture them. For this purpose the General ordered Captain Maywith to charge them with his squadron of dragoons. The gunner
ssed the Rio Grande, completely routed, leaving on the field the usual marks of defeat and rout. He then proceeded to Fort Brown. During his absence it had been heavily bombarded, and the commander, Major Brown, had been killed. On the 28th the House resolved itself into Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union, to take up the joint resolutions, tendering the thanks of Congress to General Taylor and the army of occupation for recent brilliant services on the Rio Grande. On May 29th a skirmish opened between two men, for each of whom the future had in store the highest political responsibilities and honors. These men came from the same section. They coincided on the leading war issues; but their early associations and education had made them totally unlike in their powers and personal character. One was Mr. Jefferson Davis, the other was Mr. Andrew Johnson. Mr. Davis, in supporting the resolution, had protested against the unjust criticisms on the army and th
now required? I make no other distinction than that which constitutional principles and relative necessity require. Beyond attending the caucuses of his party, introducing the before-mentioned speeches, and with some resolutions on business matters, and such like duties, Mr. Davis was one of the most quiet members of Congress. Of the war clouds which lowered over the country Mr. Davis, many years after his active life had closed, wrote: Texas having been annexed to the United States in 1845, and Mexico threatening to invade Texas with intent to recover the territory, General Taylor was ordered to defend Texas as a part of the United States. He proceeded with all his available force, about one thousand five hundred, to Corpus Christi. There he was joined by reinforcements of regulars and volunteers. Discussion had arisen as to whether the Nueces or the Rio Grande was the proper boundary of Texas. His political opinions, whatever they might be, were subordinate to the duty of
December 8th, 1845 AD (search for this): chapter 21
Chapter 21: Mr. Davis's first session in Congress. Mr. Davis took his seat as a member of the House of Representatives on Monday, December 8, 1845. On the 29th of the month he offered two resolutions — the first: That the Committee on Military Affairs be instructed to inquire into the expediency of converting a portion of the forts of the United States into schools for military instruction, on the basis of substituting their present garrisons of enlisted men by detachments furnished from each State of our Union, in ratio of their several representatives in the Congress of the United States. The second: Instructing the Committee on the Post-office and Post-roads to inquire into the expediency of establishing a direct daily mail route from Montgomery, Ala., to Jackson, Miss. With the presentation of these resolutions Mr. Davis for a time seemed satisfied. He remained in his seat, however, a keen observer of the forms of parliamentary procedure, and made
er he listened attentively once, and never again, unless pleased. Mr. Adams, when the debate was over, arose and said to one of the other members, We shall hear more of that young man, I fancy. While these amenities were at their height, Mr. Giddings showed a full set of gleaming teeth, and evidently enjoyed the little impromptu debate, not caring which got the worst of it. He seemed to think the slave-holders were given over to each other, and was willing to let them alone. On March II, 1846, Mr. Polk sent a message in which he declared a state of war already existing. Mr. Davis, in the House, simultaneously with Mr. Calhoun, in the Senate, neither knowing the other had made the point, announced that while the President could declare a state of hostilities the right to declare war rested alone with Congress, the agent of the States. The rate at which Federal power has encroached can be somewhat marked by this incident, which occurred in Congress at the time the first hostiliti
February 6th, 1846 AD (search for this): chapter 21
the Committee on the Post-office and Post-roads to inquire into the expediency of establishing a direct daily mail route from Montgomery, Ala., to Jackson, Miss. With the presentation of these resolutions Mr. Davis for a time seemed satisfied. He remained in his seat, however, a keen observer of the forms of parliamentary procedure, and made himself practically familiar with the questions likely to come up for discussion during the session. His first speech was successful. On February 6, 1846, on the Oregon question, in Committee of the Whole, he addressed the House. It seems needless at this late day to revive dead discussions and to elaborately explain political issues that have long since been settled. I shall therefore quote only such passages from the official reports as tend to illustrate traits of Mr. Davis's character or his subsequent political actions. In this speech Mr. Davis exhibited one characteristic that was never modified and often put to crucial tests
March 8th, 1846 AD (search for this): chapter 21
cal opinions, whatever they might be, were subordinate to the duty of a soldier to execute the orders of his Government, and without uttering it, he acted on the apothegm of Decatur, My country; right or wrong, my country. Texas claimed protection for her frontier; the President recognized the fact that Texas had been admitted into the Union with the Rio Grande as her boundary; and General Taylor was instructed to advance to the river. His force had been increased to 4,000, when, on March 8, 1846, he marched from Corpus Christi. He was of course conscious of the inadequacy of his division to resist such an army as Mexico might send against it; but, when ordered by superior authority, it was not for him to remonstrate. General Gaines, commanding the Western Division of the army, had made requisition for a sufficient number of volunteers to join General Taylor, but the Secretary of War countermanded them, except as to such as had already joined. General Taylor, after making a d
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...