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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ation of the President, and gave the most cogent reasons why these secret negotiations should not be made public. It would be a most embarrassing precedent, and one it would be unadvisable to establish and impracticable to follow. Mr. Winthrop, of Massachusetts, Mr. Seddon, of Virginia, and most of the conservative men of the House objected to calling for the secret papers as a dangerous precedent; but Mr. Winthrop said if any were called for, he wanted also those concerning Texas and Louisiana. T. Butler King and other men of national reputation spoke warmly against the resolutions. Seen in the light of the investigations of this day, and the immense deficits which have been discovered in the public funds, this inquiry of Mr. Ingersoll's seems to have been a mere tempest in a tea-pot. Then it stirred men deeply on both sides of the House and became almost a party question. The effort to stain the great reputation of Mr. Webster, in the possession of which the North and Sou
Yorkshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 22
ach other for some time until I ventured the remark that, whether by sin and sorrow, or observation of natural forces, I felt that, as man progressed, he became more interesting, whereupon Mr. Ingersoll laughingly said, You see Mrs. Davis agrees with me that Cain was more aggressive, and therefore more attractive than Abel, and the ladies in the Land of Nod clearly were more agreeable than those of Eden. After this evening Mr. Ingersoll was so good as to call several times, and I felt, in Yorkshire phrase, uplifted by the attention. The whole family of Baches were brilliant, well-educated, and thoroughly pleasant people. They had little of poor Richard's thrift, but much of their grandfather's shrewd wit and wisdom. Mrs. Bache (nee Dallas) and her sister, Mrs. Campbell, of Philadelphia, were rare women of the stamp of Lady Palmerston. Age did not seem to dull their sympathies nor impair their mental and moral qualities. They wore the marks of many years well spent, Of vir
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
he President, and gave the most cogent reasons why these secret negotiations should not be made public. It would be a most embarrassing precedent, and one it would be unadvisable to establish and impracticable to follow. Mr. Winthrop, of Massachusetts, Mr. Seddon, of Virginia, and most of the conservative men of the House objected to calling for the secret papers as a dangerous precedent; but Mr. Winthrop said if any were called for, he wanted also those concerning Texas and Louisiana. T. men of the House, following pretty much the bent of party rancor, the resolutions were passed. This resolution called up T. Butler King, of Georgia, in defence of Mr. Webster; Mr. Ingersoll in reiteration and reaffirmation; Mr. Ashman, of Massachusetts, in defence. Mr. Schenck and Mr. John Pettit (Democrat) each moved that a committee be organized, the first to inquire how the seal of confidence imposed upon the Department had been broken; the second to examine into the charges, with a
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
enemies, but rather of a brother explaining to his family one of his contentions with the outer world, and confiding his unexpected annoyance to those of whose sympathy he was assured. I venture to say he received it very generally. The ladies and the reporters certainly were with him. After various pros and cons, stated by almost all the leading men of the House, following pretty much the bent of party rancor, the resolutions were passed. This resolution called up T. Butler King, of Georgia, in defence of Mr. Webster; Mr. Ingersoll in reiteration and reaffirmation; Mr. Ashman, of Massachusetts, in defence. Mr. Schenck and Mr. John Pettit (Democrat) each moved that a committee be organized, the first to inquire how the seal of confidence imposed upon the Department had been broken; the second to examine into the charges, with a view to impeaching Mr. Webster. This last committee, of course, had the power conferred to send for persons and papers. Under this permission ex-
Navy Island (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
shonesty — it was not a day of personal investigations. Wall Street had no subterranean passage leading to the White House; and an imputation upon the honor of a senator startled his colleagues like a fire-bell in the night. Mr. Ingersoll astonished the House and Senate by moving an inquiry into Mr. Webster's conduct as Secretary of State. lie asked for the papers relating to the killing of Durpree, an American. In 1837, a party of Americans had made an effort to capture and occupy Navy Island, a British possession, and Durpree had been one of them. The attempt was not successful, the invading party were captured, and Durpree killed in the melee. In 1840, two years after, McLeod, the man who killed him, related the circumstance in a boastful manner in New York. He was arrested and tried for murder. Mr. Fox, for the English Government, avowed the act and demanded McLeod's release. Mr. Ingersoll accused Mr. Webster of using the contingent fund and his personal influence ov
Marshfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
deprecate his policy more than I do, I would not make a false and partizan report or parley with my sense of justice and honor, nor would the gentlemen associated with me. The letter is much defaced from which this quotation is made, and all the account cannot be deciphered. Mr. Webster called upon Mr. Davis and expressed in warm terms his sense of the manly manner in which he had defended him. Mr. and Mrs. Webster came to call upon me, and invited me most kindly to accompany them to Marshfield. It was in 1845 that the first Exposition of a general character took place. It was called then a National Exhibition. It was a very long, rough, clapboard room, with no pretention to any architectural merit. It occupied nearly two squares on C Street, and was perfectly straight except in the open square of the City Hall, there it extended an ugly arm about twenty feet. The stands for the exhibit were of unplaned wood, and they were covered with coarse, dark cambric. Almost every S
Sweden (Sweden) (search for this): chapter 22
greatest savans the country had produced; George Bache, a brilliant naval officer, who gallantly gave up his life to save the passengers on his sinking ship, and with a sad smile took off his cap and bowed to them as his ship went down before the overladen boats; Richard Bache, also an officer of the Navy, drowned while making a survey of the coast; Mrs. Robert J. Walker, the wife of the Secretary of the Treasury and whilom Senator from Mississippi; Mrs. Irwin, wife of the former Minister to Sweden; Mrs. William H. Emory, whose husband was afterward a General in the United States Army, and who was herself a well-known wit; Mrs. Charles Abert; Mrs. Richard Wainright of the Navy, and Mrs. Allen McLane, a woman of marvellous wit, and strong, bright understanding. They were all, in their different manner, belles esprits, and their children, many of them, are inheritors of much of the family talent-Mrs. Walker's beautiful daughter, Mary, afterward became Mrs. Brewster, the wife of the Att
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
peaching Mr. Webster. This last committee, of course, had the power conferred to send for persons and papers. Under this permission ex-President Tyler had been summoned to Washington. On the committee, as finally organized, were Mr. Vinton, of Ohio; Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; D. P. King, of New York, and Jacob Brinkerhoff, of Ohio. It was before them that ex-President Tyler appeared and exonerated Mr. Webster. There were two reports written: one vindicatory of Mr. Webster, but depOhio. It was before them that ex-President Tyler appeared and exonerated Mr. Webster. There were two reports written: one vindicatory of Mr. Webster, but deprecatory of further inquiry, and a minority report, which was written by Mr. Davis, and was not the one at first designed to be presented, but which finally, after many emendations, was accepted by the committee. As Mr. Webster was looked upon at the time as the prominent candidate for the Presidency, there were some unpleasant remarks about a Democrat whitewashing him; and a Northern tariff Democrat came to Mr. Davis, at our lodging, the night before the result of the committee's deliberati
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
d turning them from side to side under his tourmal until every shade of color shone distinctly. It made me feel brilliant to talk to him. Then he had the knack of looking interested in the most simple, dull persons, and gave his undivided attention to them for the time. He was liberalized by extensive and observant travel, and could bear the dulness of others, being so able to illuminate it by his own light. His wife was a charming woman, with the best, but the most pronounced, type of New England manners — reserved to a fault, but very sweet and approachable to the few she accepted as congenial to her taste. Governor Marcy was one of the lions of that time. His wife was a sterling woman, who had a great deal of social talent united to an unconventional honesty remarkable in a woman of the world. They were wealthy, and entertained with ease and profusion. He was not a genial man; he was ambitious and too much in earnest to spare time for social intercourse, but he held well
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Under this permission ex-President Tyler had been summoned to Washington. On the committee, as finally organized, were Mr. Vinton, of Ohio; Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; D. P. King, of New York, and Jacob Brinkerhoff, of Ohio. It was before them that ex-President Tyler appeared and exonerated Mr. Webster. There were two relso an officer of the Navy, drowned while making a survey of the coast; Mrs. Robert J. Walker, the wife of the Secretary of the Treasury and whilom Senator from Mississippi; Mrs. Irwin, wife of the former Minister to Sweden; Mrs. William H. Emory, whose husband was afterward a General in the United States Army, and who was herself se occasions Mr. Davis and Professor Bache, General Emory and Mr. Walker, jested like boys, told stories of their West-Point life, or of canvasses for office in Mississippi. I had known Mr. Walker since my infancy, and his wife was my mother's dear and intimate friend before my birth, and sometimes we went into a regular romp with
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