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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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r this discussion until I return. When General Lee came back, he told me that General Johnston and some pickets with field artillery. General Lee rises to the occasion and seems to be equaacross the field from a house before which General Lee's horse was standing. I turned down to the house, and asked General Lee what the musketry firing meant. He replied by asking whether I had hfavorable to the transmission of sound. General Lee and myself then rode to the field of battleembarrass the movements of troops. When General Lee and I, riding down theNine-mile road, reached impassable by the rise of the river. General Lee at nightfall gave instructions to General Se there to see him. To relieve both him and General Lee from any embarrassment, I preferred to makel knowledge of the subject: I consider General Lee's exhibition of grand and administrative tuse and seemed to desire such arrangement. General Lee is in the field, commanding. General G. W.[4 more...]
R. H. Chilton (search for this): chapter 26
ours was in round numbers 16,000. General R. E. Lee was now in immediate command, and thenceforward directed the movements of the army in front of Richmond. Laborious and exact in details, as he was vigilant and comprehensive in grand strategy, a power, with which the public had not credited him, soon became manifest in all that makes an army a rapid, accurate, compact machine, with responsive motion in all its parts. I extract the following sentence from a letter from the late Colonel R. H. Chilton, Adjutant and Inspector-General of the Army of the Confederacy, because of his special knowledge of the subject: I consider General Lee's exhibition of grand and administrative talents and indomitable energy, in bringing up that army in so short a time to that state of discipline which maintained aggregation through those terrible seven days fights around Richmond, as probably his grandest achievement. On June 2d June 2, 1862, the President addressed a letter of thanks
Richmond McClellan (search for this): chapter 26
hought the water of the Chickahominy would prove injurious to his troops, and had therefore directed them to cross, and to halt at the first good water. General McClellan following up Johnston's movement, drew his lines nearer to the Confederate capital. His army at this time numbered, present and absent, 156,838; effectives rs. He asked me what I thought it was proper to do. Recurring to a conversation held about the time we had together visited General Johnston, I answered that McClellan should be attacked on the other side of the Chickahominy before he matured his preparations for a siege of Richmond. To this he promptly assented, as I anticipa from such means will be when large masses of troops are in motion. A balloon called the Intrepid, containing two people, ascended from Richmond and hung over McClellan's camp for two hours, about the end of July, 1862. Yesterday morning I thought we would engage the enemy, reported to be in large force on the Upper Chickah
ng intelligence. The Yankees had been eight or ten days fortifying the position in which we attacked them on Saturday, and thefirst intimation I had of their having slept on this side of the Chickahominy, was after I had gone into an encampment from which they had been driven. The ignorance of their works caused much of the loss we suffered. If the Mississippi troops, lying in camp when not retreating under Beauregard, were at home, they would probably keep a section of the river free for our use, and closed against Yankee transports. It is hard to see incompetence losing opportunity and wasting hard-gotten means, but harder still to bear is the knowledge that there is no available remedy. I cultivate hope and patience, and trust to the blunders of our enemy and the gallantry of our troops for ultimate success. Tell Helen that Captain Keary has been in the column most distinguished of late. Jackson is probably now marching toward this side of the Blue Ridge.
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 26
On Saturday we had a severe battle and suffered severely in attacking the enemy's intrenchments, of which our Generals were poorly informed. Some of them, and those most formidable, were found by receiving their fire. Our troops behaved most gallantly, drove the enemy out of their encampments, captured their batteries, carried their advanced redoubts, and marched forward under fire more heavy than I had ever previously witnessed. Our loss was heavy, that of the enemy unknown. General J. E. Johnston is severely wounded. The poor fellow bore his suffering most heroically. When he was about to be put into the ambulance to be removed from the field, I dismounted to speak to him; he opened his eyes, smiled, and gave me his hand, said he did not know how seriously he was hurt, but feared a fragment of shell had injured his spine. It was probably a shell loaded with musket-balls, as there appears to be a wound of a ball in his shoulder ranging down toward the lungs. I saw him yes
intrenched camp, General Rodes, by a movement to the right, driving in the enemy's left. The only reinforcements on the field, in hand, were my own brigades, of which Anderson's, Wilcox's, and Kemper's were put in by the front on the Williamsburg road, and Colston's and Pryor's by my right flank. At the same time the decided and gallant attack made by the other brigades gained entire possession of the enemy's position, with his artillery, campequipage, etc. Anderson's brigade, under Colonel Jenkins, pressing forward rapidly, continued to drive the enemy till nightfall. The conduct of the attack was left entirely to Major-General Hill. The entire success of the affair is sufficient evidence of his ability, courage, and skill. In reference to the failure of General Huger to make the attack expected of him, Mr. Davis said: Some explanation should be given of an apparent dilatoriness on the part of that veteran soldier, who, after long and faithful service, now fills an h
entire division of General Hill became engaged about three o'clock, and drove the enemy back, gaining possession of his abatis and part of his intrenched camp, General Rodes, by a movement to the right, driving in the enemy's left. The only reinforcements on the field, in hand, were my own brigades, of which Anderson's, Wilcox's, t Huger's specialty was artillery, he being the officer who commanded the siege-guns with which General Scott marched from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico. General Rodes, alluding to the difficulty he had with his infantry in getting on the field, said: The progress of the brigade was delayed by the washing away of the bridge, ods under a heavy fire of artillery and musketry. General Huger's line of march was nearer to the swamp, and the impediments consequently greater than where General Rodes found the route so difficult as to be dangerous even to infantry. On the next day, June ist, the enemy endeavored to retake the works Hill's division had
Archer Anderson (search for this): chapter 26
id he believed he had gone to a farm-house in the rear, adding that he thought he was ill. Riding on the bluff which overlooks the Meadow Bridge, I asked Colonel Anderson, posted there in observation, whether he had seen anything of the enemy in his front. He said that he had seen only two mounted men across the bridge, and ached camp, General Rodes, by a movement to the right, driving in the enemy's left. The only reinforcements on the field, in hand, were my own brigades, of which Anderson's, Wilcox's, and Kemper's were put in by the front on the Williamsburg road, and Colston's and Pryor's by my right flank. At the same time the decided and gallant attack made by the other brigades gained entire possession of the enemy's position, with his artillery, campequipage, etc. Anderson's brigade, under Colonel Jenkins, pressing forward rapidly, continued to drive the enemy till nightfall. The conduct of the attack was left entirely to Major-General Hill. The entire success of
John B. Hood (search for this): chapter 26
patched my office business and rode out toward the Meadow Bridge to see the action commence. On the road I found Smith's division halted and the men dispersed in the woods. Looking for someone from whom I could get information, I finally saw General Hood, and asked him the meaning of what I saw. He told me he did not know anything more than that they had been halted. I asked him where General Smith was; he said he believed he had gone to a farm-house in the rear, adding that he thought he wasboth sides of the Williamsburg road, near to its intersection with theNine-mile road. The wing consisted of Hill's, Huger's, and Longstreet's divisions, with light batteries, and a small force of cavalry; the division of General G. W. Smith, less Hood's brigade ordered to the right, formed the left wing, and its position was on theNine-mile road. There were small tracts of cleared land, but most of the ground was wooded, and much of it so covered with water as to seriously embarrass the moveme
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 26
the conjunction of the two it was expected to double him up. Then Longstreet was to come on the Mechanicsville Bridge and attack him in front.the main road which led to the Mechanicsville Bridge, I found General Longstreet, walking to and fro in an impatient, it might be said fretfulth theNine-mile road. The wing consisted of Hill's, Huger's, and Longstreet's divisions, with light batteries, and a small force of cavalry; For the operations on the right he referred to the report of General Longstreet, who was in chief command. From this report, published by thke the works Hill's division had captured the day before. General Longstreet was ordered to attack on the morning of the 31st. The divisiim, we rode together to the Williamsburg road, where we found General Longstreet, his command being in front, and then engaged with the enemy s, killed wounded, and missing, was 6,804; of which 4,851 were in Longstreet's command on the right, and 1,233 in Smith's command on the left.
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