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General Edward Johnston. On May 25th Generals Jackson, Edward Johnston, and Ewell, drove the enemy across the Potomac into Maryland. Two thousand prisoners were d learned that General Fremont's advance was in the immediate vicinity. General Ewell held Fremont in check with so little difficulty that General Taylor describ Ashby, vigilant and enterprising, soon perceived this, and pointing it out to Ewell, asked for infantry to attack the pursuing party so as to destroy them before t as the First Maryland was moving into the battle of Cross Keys they passed General Ewell. He said to the commanding officer, Colonel Johnson, you ought to affix a mph in all the battles of the regiment. After the battle of Port Republic, General Ewell issued the following order: Headquarters Third Division, June 12, 1862. pended to the color staff of the First Maryland Regiment. By order of Major-General Ewell. James Barbour, A. A. G. At Crosskeys, on June 8th, Jackson defeated
eet he cried, Virginians, forward! and in the instant fell dead. As he fell Colonel Johnson with the First Maryland charged and swept the fence clear, and killed and wounded most of the routed enemy; they proved to be the Pennsylvania Bucktails, a crack battalion under Lieutenant- Colonel Kane, who was wounded and captured. Colonel Johnson's horse was killed, shot in three places. His color-sergeant and three corporals were shot down in instantaneous succession at the colors, but Corporal Shanks seized them and bore them to the end. Two days afterward, June 8th, as the First Maryland was moving into the battle of Cross Keys they passed General Ewell. He said to the commanding officer, Colonel Johnson, you ought to affix a bucktail to your colors as a trophy. Whereupon Colonel Johnson took a bucktail from the cap of one of the men in ranks and tied it to the color lance above the colors, where it was carried in pride and triumph in all the battles of the regiment. After t
Jackson formed a junction in the valley with General Edward Johnston. On May 25th Generals Jackson, Edward Johnston, and Ewell, drove the enemy across the Potomac into Maryland. Two thousand prisoners were taken. General Banks, the commander-in-chief, said, there never were more grateful hearts in the same number of men than when, at midday on the 26th, we stood on the opposite shore. General Geary moved to Manassas Junction, burned his tents and destroyed a quantity of arms, and General Duryea telegraphed to Washington for aid. A panic ensued in Washington, and the Secretary of War issued a call to the Governors of the loyal States for militia to defend the city. Jackson pressed eagerly on to disperse the garrisons at Charlestown and Harper's Ferry. General Winder's brigade drove the enemy in disorder from Charlestown toward the Potomac. When in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry, General Jackson, with an effective force of about fifteen thousand men, much less than ei
T. J. Jackson (search for this): chapter 27
Chapter 27: Jackson in the Valley. On May 8th, General Jackson formed a junction in the valleGeneral Jackson formed a junction in the valley with General Edward Johnston. On May 25th Generals Jackson, Edward Johnston, and Ewell, droveGenerals Jackson, Edward Johnston, and Ewell, drove the enemy across the Potomac into Maryland. Two thousand prisoners were taken. General Banks, the yal States for militia to defend the city. Jackson pressed eagerly on to disperse the garrisons When in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry, General Jackson, with an effective force of about fifteenbour, A. A. G. At Crosskeys, on June 8th, Jackson defeated Fremont, and on the gth, General Shilley of the Shenandoah was our own again. Jackson went into camp near Port Republic, where the rsonal appearance of the now famous Stonewall Jackson may prove of interest to my readers. I will erlooking the road and field, and said it was Jackson. Approaching, I saluted and declared my nameemon gave me an opportunity to retire. Where Jackson got his lemons no fellow could find out, but
Edward Johnston (search for this): chapter 27
Chapter 27: Jackson in the Valley. On May 8th, General Jackson formed a junction in the valley with General Edward Johnston. On May 25th Generals Jackson, Edward Johnston, and Ewell, drove the enemy across the Potomac into Maryland. Two thousand prisoners were taken. General Banks, the commander-in-chief, said, there never were more grateful hearts in the same number of men than when, at midday on the 26th, we stood on the opposite shore. General Geary moved to Manassas Junction, Edward Johnston, and Ewell, drove the enemy across the Potomac into Maryland. Two thousand prisoners were taken. General Banks, the commander-in-chief, said, there never were more grateful hearts in the same number of men than when, at midday on the 26th, we stood on the opposite shore. General Geary moved to Manassas Junction, burned his tents and destroyed a quantity of arms, and General Duryea telegraphed to Washington for aid. A panic ensued in Washington, and the Secretary of War issued a call to the Governors of the loyal States for militia to defend the city. Jackson pressed eagerly on to disperse the garrisons at Charlestown and Harper's Ferry. General Winder's brigade drove the enemy in disorder from Charlestown toward the Potomac. When in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry, General Jackson, with an e
. On May 8th, General Jackson formed a junction in the valley with General Edward Johnston. On May 25th Generals Jackson, Edward Johnston, and Ewell, drove the enemy across the Potomac into Maryland. Two thousand prisoners were taken. General Banks, the commander-in-chief, said, there never were more grateful hearts in the same number of men than when, at midday on the 26th, we stood on the opposite shore. General Geary moved to Manassas Junction, burned his tents and destroyed a qua swoop he had descended upon each army of the enemy, that his name had come to inspire terror. It was believed that he was about to come down, like an avalanche, upon Washington, with a vast army. The magnificently equipped armies of Milroy, Banks, Shields, and Fremont, had all melted away before the resistless charges of Jackson's hard-fighting, hard-marching, ragged foot-cavalry, and the Valley of the Shenandoah was our own again. Jackson went into camp near Port Republic, where the
arned that General Fremont's advance was in the immediate vicinity. General Ewell held Fremont in check with so little difficulty that General Taylor described it as offering a temptation to make a serious attack upon Fremont's whole army. Ashby, vigilant and enterprising, soon perceived this, and pointing it out to Ewell, asked for infantry to attack the pursuing party so as to destroy them before their supports could get up. This force was given to him, and just in the dusk of the evening Ashby came upon them intrenched behind a fence. In a moment Ashby's horse was shot dead, but jumping to his feet he cried, Virginians, forward! and in the instant fell dead. As he fell Colonel Johnson with the First Maryland charged and swept the fence clear, and killed and wounded most of the routed enemy; they proved to be the Pennsylvania Bucktails, a crack battalion under Lieutenant- Colonel Kane, who was wounded and captured. Colonel Johnson's horse was killed, shot in three pla
Dick Taylor (search for this): chapter 27
were marching to intercept him, by a forced march, arrived on the night of May 31st at Strasburg, and learned that General Fremont's advance was in the immediate vicinity. General Ewell held Fremont in check with so little difficulty that General Taylor described it as offering a temptation to make a serious attack upon Fremont's whole army. Ashby, vigilant and enterprising, soon perceived this, and pointing it out to Ewell, asked for infantry to attack the pursuing party so as to destroyell wooded, and thus closed his famous valley campaign of 1862. A description of the personal appearance of the now famous Stonewall Jackson may prove of interest to my readers. I will therefore insert the interesting account given by General Dick Taylor, of their first meeting. The mounted officer who had been sent out in advance, pointed out a figure perched on the topmost rail of a fence overlooking the road and field, and said it was Jackson. Approaching, I saluted and declared m
Virginians (search for this): chapter 27
y that General Taylor described it as offering a temptation to make a serious attack upon Fremont's whole army. Ashby, vigilant and enterprising, soon perceived this, and pointing it out to Ewell, asked for infantry to attack the pursuing party so as to destroy them before their supports could get up. This force was given to him, and just in the dusk of the evening Ashby came upon them intrenched behind a fence. In a moment Ashby's horse was shot dead, but jumping to his feet he cried, Virginians, forward! and in the instant fell dead. As he fell Colonel Johnson with the First Maryland charged and swept the fence clear, and killed and wounded most of the routed enemy; they proved to be the Pennsylvania Bucktails, a crack battalion under Lieutenant- Colonel Kane, who was wounded and captured. Colonel Johnson's horse was killed, shot in three places. His color-sergeant and three corporals were shot down in instantaneous succession at the colors, but Corporal Shanks seized them
Charles Winder (search for this): chapter 27
e grateful hearts in the same number of men than when, at midday on the 26th, we stood on the opposite shore. General Geary moved to Manassas Junction, burned his tents and destroyed a quantity of arms, and General Duryea telegraphed to Washington for aid. A panic ensued in Washington, and the Secretary of War issued a call to the Governors of the loyal States for militia to defend the city. Jackson pressed eagerly on to disperse the garrisons at Charlestown and Harper's Ferry. General Winder's brigade drove the enemy in disorder from Charlestown toward the Potomac. When in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry, General Jackson, with an effective force of about fifteen thousand men, much less than either of the two armies under Shields and Fremont that were marching to intercept him, by a forced march, arrived on the night of May 31st at Strasburg, and learned that General Fremont's advance was in the immediate vicinity. General Ewell held Fremont in check with so little di
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