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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Raphael Semmes (search for this): chapter 29
slept upon the field every night, and was exposed to fire all day. About this time Mr. Davis gave me news of the Sumter. From President Davis to Mrs. Davis. Confederate States of America, Executive Department, July 7, 1862. The Sumter was found to be unseaworthy, and as she could not be prepared at Gibraltar, she was laid up there, the crew discharged, and the officers ordered to go home. Becket sailed from Hamburg, and reached Nassau about the middle of June on his way home. Captain Semmes sailed from England, and reached the same port a few days thereafter, and finding orders which assigned him to a new vessel The 290, or the Alabama. now under construction, returned from Nassau to England to superintend the building of his vessel, and took Becket with him. Nothing important from the army to-day; the enemy are still sending off demoralized troops, and are said to be still receiving reinforcements. If, as is reported, they are leaving the Southern Coast and the Tenn
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 29
and rapidly improving. I wish he were able to take the field. Despite the critics who know military affairs by instinct, he is a good soldier, never brags of what he did do, and could at this time render most valuable service. From the President to Mrs. Davis. Richmond, Va., June 25, 1862. Skirmishing yesterday and today, but not of a character to reveal the purpose of the enemy, and designed to conceal our own. Van Dorn is at Vicksburg, and preparing to make a desperate defence. Bragg may effect something, since Halleck has divided his force, and I hope will try, but there is reason to fear that his army has been woefully demoralized. Butler, properly surnamed the beast, has added to his claim for infamous notoriety by his recent orders, and report charges him with wholesale peculations, and daily selling licenses for private gain. For instance, two respectable gentlemen assured me that he sold permits for the export of salt, at the rate of five dollars per sack. Ho
y successive lines of earth — works, that reviled policy of West Pointism and spades, which is sure to succeed against those who do not employ like means to counteract it. Politicians, newspapers, and uneducated officers have created such a prejudice in our army against labor, that it will be difficult, until taught by sad experience, to induce our troops to work efficiently. The greatest generals of ancient and modern times have won their renown by labor. Victories were the results. Caesar, who revolutionized the military system of his age, never slept in a camp without intrenching it. France, Spain, and Great Britain retain to this day memorials of Roman invasion in the massive works constructed by the Roman armies. I will endeavor, by movements which are not without great hazard, to countervail the enemy's policy. If we succeed in rendering his works useless to him, and compel him to meet us on the field, I have much confidence in our ability to give him a complete defe
T. J. Jackson (search for this): chapter 29
t would be necessary to bring the stronger force of General T. J. Jackson from the Valley of the Shenandoah. So far as we were then informed, General Jackson was hotly engaged with a force superior to his own, and, before he could be withdrawn, it der General Whiting was detached to go by rail to join General Jackson, and, by a vigorous assault, drive the enemy across ths flight would not stop within the limits of Virginia, General Jackson was, with his whole force, to move rapidly on the righanner in which the division was' detached to reinforce General Jackson was so open, that it was not doubted General McClellann June 8th, to observe the enemy, mask the approach of General Jackson, and to cover the route by which he was to march, and hought it possible to pursue effectively. That was General T. J. Jackson, who quietly said, They have not all got away, if w an advantage when he gained it. He ordered Longstreet and Jackson to advance, but a violent storm which prevailed throughout
aller fields. The news from the Valley of Virginia confirms the report of the flight of the enemy, and the danger to our troops has been mainly passed. We have sent reinforcements who, as fresh troops, will move in front of the old command I saw a little boy yesterday in the street, he had his trousers rolled up and was wading in the gutter; he looked something like Jeff, and when I persuaded him to get out of the water, he raised his sunny face and laughed, but denied my conclusion. Mrs. Greenhow is here. Madam looks much changed, and has the air of one whose nerves are shaken by mental torture. General Lee's wife has arrived, her servants left her, and she found it uncomfortable to live without them. From the President to Mrs. Davis. Richmond, Va., June 21, 1862. We are preparing and taking position for the struggle which must be at hand. The stake is too high to permit the pulse to keep its even beat, but our troops are in improved condition, and as confident as
G. W. Smith (search for this): chapter 29
a., June 23, 1862. You will no doubt hear many rumors, as even here the air is full of them. Be not dis turbed, we are better prepared now than we were on the first of the month, and with God's blessing will beat the enemy as soon as we can get at him. I am nearly well again. The heat and dust are very oppressive. The wagon-trains move along in a cloud which quite conceals everything except the leading team; this, of course, refers to the roads around our main encampments. General G. W. Smith, after the manner of Beauregard, has taken a surgeon's certificate, and is about to retire for a season to recruit his health. General J. E. Johnston is steadily and rapidly improving. I wish he were able to take the field. Despite the critics who know military affairs by instinct, he is a good soldier, never brags of what he did do, and could at this time render most valuable service. From the President to Mrs. Davis. Richmond, Va., June 25, 1862. Skirmishing yesterday and
near the field and received a message from General Lee to leave it, as the enemy's guns were bearing upon it. Within a few minutes after Mr. Davis left it, the house was riddled. Even thus early the presence of foreigners in the army of the North began to be noticed, and the ranks of the Federal Army were filled up from this year forth with foreigners of all sorts and conditions of men, July 18, 1862. Of 237 dead Union soldiers who had served in these battles under the command of Colonel Woodbury, of Michigan, it was said there was but one who was American born. These men sacked and burned without the sympathy a common language would have necessarily created. When McClellan's army was in retreat, to the fatigue of hard marches and successive battles, enough to have disqualified our troops from rapid pursuit, was added the discomfort of being thoroughly wet and chilled by the rain. I sent to the neighboring houses to buy, if it could be had, at any price, enough whiske
B. F. Butler (search for this): chapter 29
what he did do, and could at this time render most valuable service. From the President to Mrs. Davis. Richmond, Va., June 25, 1862. Skirmishing yesterday and today, but not of a character to reveal the purpose of the enemy, and designed to conceal our own. Van Dorn is at Vicksburg, and preparing to make a desperate defence. Bragg may effect something, since Halleck has divided his force, and I hope will try, but there is reason to fear that his army has been woefully demoralized. Butler, properly surnamed the beast, has added to his claim for infamous notoriety by his recent orders, and report charges him with wholesale peculations, and daily selling licenses for private gain. For instance, two respectable gentlemen assured me that he sold permits for the export of salt, at the rate of five dollars per sack. How much better it would have been had the city been left a pile of ashes! The offensive-defensive campaign which resulted so gloriously to our arms was thus i
John Sargent Wise (search for this): chapter 29
er encamping there for a time, had crossed the river and moved up to Richmond; yet, when at the close of the battles around Richmond McClellan retreated and was pursued toward the James River, we had no maps of the country in which we were operating; our generals were ignorant of the roads, and their guides knew little more than the way from their homes to Richmond. It was this faaldefect inpreparation, and the erroneous answers of the guides, that caused General Lee first to post Holmes and Wise, when they came down the River road, at New Market, where, he was told, was the route that McClellan must pursue in his retreat to the James. Subsequently he learned that there was another road, by the Willis church, which would better serve the purpose of the retreating foe. The President was on the field every day during the seven days fight, and slept on it every night, and in the sixth day's fight he had taken his position in a house near the field and received a message from General
change of circumstances would make one modification necessary — it would be necessary to bring the stronger force of General T. J. Jackson from the Valley of the Shenandoah. So far as we were then informed, General Jackson was hotly engaged with a force superior to his own, and, before he could be withdrawn, it was necessary to drive the enemy out of the Valley. For this purpose, and to mask our design to make a junction of Jackson's forces with those of Lee, a strong division under General Whiting was detached to go by rail to join General Jackson, and, by a vigorous assault, drive the enemy across the Potomac. As soon as he commenced a retreat which unmistakably showed that his flight would not stop within the limits of Virginia, General Jackson was, with his whole force, to move rapidly on the right flank of the enemy, north of the Chickahominy. The manner in which the division was' detached to reinforce General Jackson was so open, that it was not doubted General McClellan w
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