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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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William Preston Johnston (search for this): chapter 29
eneral Robert E. Lee, on the previous day, I informed him that he would be assigned to the command of the army, vice General Johnston, wounded. On the next morning he proceeded to the field and took command of the troops. During the night our forceued to its legitimate results, would leave us nothing, except gradually to fall back to the Gulf of Mexico.--Colonel William Preston Johnston, Belford's Magazine for June, 1890. I soon withdrew and rode to the front, where General Lee joined me, and ally, that I knew nothing better than the plan he had previously explained to me, which was to have been executed by General Johnston, but was not carried out; that the change of circumstances would make one modification necessary — it would be necesuld stay with our centre, and if McClellan made that attempt he should hold the centre as long as he could.--Colonel William Preston Johnston, Belford's Magazine, June, 1890. From President Davis to Mrs. Davis. Confederate States of America, Exec
J. E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 29
n the public confidence is without a precedent. At the commencement of the war he enjoyed the highest reputation of any officer on the continent. The operations of General Lee in the short campaign which is just over were certainly those of a master. No captain that ever lived could have planned or executed a better campaign. It was perfect in all its parts, and will be set down hereafter as among the models which the military student will be required to study. The army under General Johnston on May 31st, from official reports,. showed an effective strength of 62,696. Deduct the losses sustained in the battle of Seven Pines, as shown by the official reports of casualties, say, 6,084 and we have 56,612 as the number of effectives when General Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virginia. Before the seven days battles around Richmond, reinforcements to the number of 24, 50 were brought to the army, so that at the beginning of the contest with McClellan, Lee had 8
William Howell (search for this): chapter 29
eat hazard, to countervail the enemy's policy. If we succeed in rendering his works useless to him, and compel him to meet us on the field, I have much confidence in our ability to give him a complete defeat, and then it may be possible to teach him the pain of invasion, and to feed our army on his territory. The issues of campaigns can never be safely foretold; it is for us to do all which can be done, and trustingly to leave our fate to Him who rules the universe. Our infant son, William Howell, lay at the point of death, and Mr. Davis, who could not come, wrote. Richmond, June 13, 1862. My heart sunk within me at the news of the suffering of my angel baby. Your telegram of the 12th gives assurance of the subsidence of disease. But the look of pain and exhaustion, the gentle complaint, I am tired, which has for so many years oppressed me, seems to have been revived; and unless God spares me another such trial, what is to become of me, I don't know. Dr. Garnett will, I
Richmond McClellan (search for this): chapter 29
son was so open, that it was not doubted General McClellan would soon be apprised of it, and would oo weak for a protracted resistance, and, if McClellan was the man I took him for when I nominated with his main body was assailing and turning McClellan's right on the north side of the Chickahominy, McClellan might make a show of resistance there, and with his superior forces cross the Chickahont Davis should stay with our centre, and if McClellan made that attempt he should hold the centre when at the close of the battles around Richmond McClellan retreated and was pursued toward the Jamrket, where, he was told, was the route that McClellan must pursue in his retreat to the James. Suso that at the beginning of the contest with McClellan, Lee had 80,762 effectives for battle. Ihere would have been a general dispersion of McClellan's army, and the remnant which might have bee disappointments were ordered for our gain. McClellan certainly showed capacity in his retreat, bu[4 more...]
thanked God; when it shone nearer to the city they prayed for help from above. The President slept upon the field every night, and was exposed to fire all day. About this time Mr. Davis gave me news of the Sumter. From President Davis to Mrs. Davis. Confederate States of America, Executive Department, July 7, 1862. The Sumter was found to be unseaworthy, and as she could not be prepared at Gibraltar, she was laid up there, the crew discharged, and the officers ordered to go home. Becket sailed from Hamburg, and reached Nassau about the middle of June on his way home. Captain Semmes sailed from England, and reached the same port a few days thereafter, and finding orders which assigned him to a new vessel The 290, or the Alabama. now under construction, returned from Nassau to England to superintend the building of his vessel, and took Becket with him. Nothing important from the army to-day; the enemy are still sending off demoralized troops, and are said to be still r
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 29
o Harrison's Landing, and he had so many hours the start that, among the general officers who expressed their opinion to me, only one thought it possible to pursue effectively. That was General T. J. Jackson, who quietly said, They have not all got away, if we go immediately after them. General Lee was not given to indecision, and they have mistaken his character who suppose caution was his vice. He was prone to attack, and not slow to press an advantage when he gained it. He ordered Longstreet and Jackson to advance, but a violent storm which prevailed throughout the day greatly retarded their progress. The enemy, harassed and closely followed by the cavalry, succeeded in gaining Westover, on the James River, and the protection of his gun — boats. His position was one of great natural and artificial strength, after the heights were occupied and intrenched. It was flanked on each side by guns of his shipping, as well as by those mounted in his intrenchments. Under these circu
uct the losses sustained in the battle of Seven Pines, as shown by the official reports of casualties, say, 6,084 and we have 56,612 as the number of effectives when General Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virginia. Before the seven days battles around Richmond, reinforcements to the number of 24, 50 were brought to the army, so that at the beginning of the contest with McClellan, Lee had 80,762 effectives for battle. If we adopt as correct the Confederate loss as given by Swinton, say 19,000, then it would appear that when McClellan reached the James River with 8s,000 to 90,000 men, he was being pursued by Lee with but 62,000. Colonel Taylor: Four Years with Lee, When the news of our great victory over such long odds came to Raleigh, everyone was breathless with excitement. The telegraph office was separated by a narrow alley from my room in the hotel. As I walked my ill baby to and fro by the window, a voice came from the street, Tell us what you know, ple
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 29
e were on the first of the month, and with God's blessing will beat the enemy as soon as we can get at him. I am nearly well again. The heat and dust are very oppressive. The wagon-trains move along in a cloud which quite conceals everything except the leading team; this, of course, refers to the roads around our main encampments. General G. W. Smith, after the manner of Beauregard, has taken a surgeon's certificate, and is about to retire for a season to recruit his health. General J. E. Johnston is steadily and rapidly improving. I wish he were able to take the field. Despite the critics who know military affairs by instinct, he is a good soldier, never brags of what he did do, and could at this time render most valuable service. From the President to Mrs. Davis. Richmond, Va., June 25, 1862. Skirmishing yesterday and today, but not of a character to reveal the purpose of the enemy, and designed to conceal our own. Van Dorn is at Vicksburg, and preparing to make a
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 29
nt of Richmond, but without intrenchments. General Lee immediately constructed earthworks. They wessed my disappointment at their views, and General Lee remarked that he had, before I came in, saike a junction of Jackson's forces with those of Lee, a strong division under General Whiting was de of the daring and unfaltering fortitude of General Lee, I will here recite an impressive conversatis old esprit de corps manifested itself in General Lee's first response, that he did not know engits there. The chief danger was that, while Lee with his main body was assailing and turning Mcwhose nerves are shaken by mental torture. General Lee's wife has arrived, her servants left her, art received confidential instructions from General Lee, the execution of which is so interwoven wiave 56,612 as the number of effectives when General Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virgin but 62,000. Colonel Taylor: Four Years with Lee, When the news of our great victory over su[12 more...]
Richard Griffith (search for this): chapter 29
nterwoven with the seven days battles as to be more appropriately noticed in connection with them. According to the published reports, General McClellan's position was regarded at this time as extremely critical. During the night I visited the several commands along the intrenchment on the south side of the Chickahominy. In one of these engagements our loss was small in numbers, but great in value. Among others who could ill be spared, here fell the gallant soldier Brigadier-General Richard Griffith. He had served with distinction in foreign war, and when the South was invaded was among the first to take up arms in defence of our rights. Mr. Davis leaned over him and said, My dear boy, I hope you are not seriously hurt. The General grasped his hand and said, Yes, I think fatally; farewell, Colonel. Our troops slept upon their arms. The enemy retreated during the night, and by the time thus gained, he was enabled to cross the White Oak Creek and destroy the bridge
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