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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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James Grant (search for this): chapter 53
Chapter 53: battle of Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864. Grant's plan of campaign was, if he should be unable to defeat Lee, or fail to take Richmond, to cross the James River below Richmond, and possess himself of Petersburg, cut off the supplies f main body of his own force, together with the detachment from General Lee's army, that he should join General Lee, crush Grant, and march to Washington. Mr. Davis, in Rise and Fall. The following is the communication alluded to above. Conousand men to unite with Breckenridge and fall upon the enemy's flank with over twenty thousand effectives-thus rendering Grant's defeat certain and decisive; and in time to enable General Beauregard to return, with a reinforcement from General Lee,can be effected, and the picture presented is one of starvation. Without it General Lee must eventually fall back before Grant's heavy reinforcements, and the view presented merely anticipates this movement for offensive purposes. Meantime it is i
ten o'clock, I got a despatch informing me of the fall of J. E. B. Stuart, mortally wounded, at Yellow Tavern, and that Sheridan was expected to assault the outer works north of Richmond, at dawn the next day. Immediately my two movable brigades, Grt in time, the morning of May 10th, to see a battery of artillery there, unsupported by anything, repulse the advance of Sheridan. During the night the clerks and citizens, under General Custis Lee, had spread a thin line along part of the fortificat from that position. As the day advanced Gracie's brigade was thrown in front of the works and pressed forward to feel Sheridan, but it was soon evident that we could make no real impression on him, and I regarded it as almost madness with two smal open country five times my strength, thereby leaving Richmond entirely unprotected, except by the clerks and citizens. Sheridan withdrew, Gracie's and Fry's brigades returned to near Drury's Bluff. During the week most all of Beauregard's troop
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 53
r ashes. Our troops were then withdrawn to an inner and shorter line, closer to the works at Drury's. On the afternoon of the 14th, wrote Mr. Davis, I rode down to visit General Beauregard. A letter from General Beauregard to General Bragg, dated Weldon, April 29th, gave the names of the Federal generals commanding forces on the Southern coast. The arrival, he said, of any of these officers in Virginia would indicate the transfer of their troops thither, and concluded by sayin with safety. Day after to-morrow two thousand more, perhaps, as our lines will probably be stronger, if, as we expect, the forward line can be occupied to-day. (Signed) P. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. Endorsement on the above: General Bragg, Commanding, etc., etc. This memorandum was handed to me this day by Colonel Melton, A. & I. General's Department, and is referred to you for attention. General Lee is best informed of his situation, and his ability is too well establishe
I. General (search for this): chapter 53
orth Carolina; and impossible to hold our present line in front of Butler with a much reduced force. At present three thousand men can be spared with safety. Day after to-morrow two thousand more, perhaps, as our lines will probably be stronger, if, as we expect, the forward line can be occupied to-day. (Signed) P. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. Endorsement on the above: General Bragg, Commanding, etc., etc. This memorandum was handed to me this day by Colonel Melton, A. & I. General's Department, and is referred to you for attention. General Lee is best informed of his situation, and his ability is too well established to incline me to adopt the opinion of anyone at a distance as to the movements which his army should make, either for its preservation or the protection of its communications. If fifteen thousand men can be spared for the flank movement proposed, certainly ten thousand may be sent to reinforce General Lee. If that be done immediately, General Lee'
I got a despatch informing me of the fall of J. E. B. Stuart, mortally wounded, at Yellow Tavern, and that Sheridan was expected to assault the outer works north of Richmond, at dawn the next day. Immediately my two movable brigades, Gracie's and Fry's, and a light battery were hastened to and through Richmond, and I arrived with them at the fortifications on Mechanicsville turnpike just in time, the morning of May 10th, to see a battery of artillery there, unsupported by anything, repulse the impression on him, and I regarded it as almost madness with two small brigades to engage in an open country five times my strength, thereby leaving Richmond entirely unprotected, except by the clerks and citizens. Sheridan withdrew, Gracie's and Fry's brigades returned to near Drury's Bluff. During the week most all of Beauregard's troops had come up. In obedience to a despatch from him, at about 2 or 2.30 P. M., I met Beauregard at Major Drury's residence, about a mile from the Bluff.
ave different instructions. Beauregard more than once, while I remained with him, remarked upon not hearing anything of Whiting, and seemed nervous about him. The day wore away, and I, becoming more than impatient, about 3 P. M., as I recall the ti was to guard the space between his left and the river, to give him information of any movement in that quarter. General Whiting, with some force, was holding a defensive position at Petersburg. General Beauregard proposed that the main part of, during a battle, of attempting to make a junction of troops moving from opposite sides of the enemy, and proposed that Whiting's command should move at night by the Chesterfield road, where they would not probably be observed by Butler's advance. hments, and there was no sign of purpose to make any immediate movement. General Beauregard said he was waiting to hear Whiting's guns, and had been expecting him for some time to approach on the Petersburg road. Soon after this the foe, in a stra
Robert Ransom (search for this): chapter 53
's Bluff. Butler moved forward again to confront them. General Robert Ransom said, in a monograph upon this battle: Beauregard, whe order of battle was handed me. After reading it and finding that Ransom's brigade formed part of the reserve, I asked that it might be givenstantly to Beauregard reporting what had happened, and asked that Ransom's brigade might come to me at once to continue the pressure and makd refused. The ammunition being still delayed, I again begged that Ransom's brigade be sent me, but instead of that there came two small regid repeatedly that he did not think victory possible. He refused me Ransom's brigade, anticipating disaster. He held me by his side for an dreds. I offered, for the purpose of attacking Butler, to send General Ransom with the field force he had for the protection of Richmond. Hetion in front of the breastworks. A regiment of cavalry, not under Ransom's orders, was to guard the space between his left and the river, to
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 53
e and battery, and Butler withdrew. Some of Beauregard's troops drove him from the railroad and turury's Bluff. During the week most all of Beauregard's troops had come up. In obedience to a despar, and that I knew it and it knew me. General Beauregard declined to make the change, saying, It ing over the turnpike. This was reported to Beauregard direct. After being with Beauregard, I suppntil Butler was safe at Bermuda Hundreds did Beauregard realize that victory complete and crushing opurpose to make any immediate movement. General Beauregard said he was waiting to hear Whiting's gudge of the turnpike in conversation with General Beauregard. They, without apparently noticing the Soon after the affair at Drury's Bluff, General Beauregard addressed to me a communication, propositain and decisive; and in time to enable General Beauregard to return, with a reinforcement from Genpurport was communicated to him, ordered General Beauregard to straighten his line, so as to reduce [28 more...]
John H. Reagan (search for this): chapter 53
irect. After being with Beauregard, I suppose an hour, I left for my command, awaiting his directions, as he had ordered me to remain stationary till he gave different instructions. Beauregard more than once, while I remained with him, remarked upon not hearing anything of Whiting, and seemed nervous about him. The day wore away, and I, becoming more than impatient, about 3 P. M., as I recall the time, went to seek Beauregard. I found him with many other gentlemen, the President, and Secretary Reagan, among others, in the turnpike just north of where the fortifications cross it. I heard no firing of any sort except an occasional shot from a field battery of the enemy, its shells were thrown directly up the turnpike. While we all stood in this locality a slight shower of rain fell, not enough to wet anyone in even thin clothing. A little before five o'clock, I think, Beauregard seemed to have determined upon some aggressive movement. I was directed to have my troops ready to move
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 53
om the Confederate Capital, and, reinforced by Butler with 30,000 men, attack it from the south. Butler was ordered to concentrate his troops at City Point. From this base he was to destroy the rd against Lee's whole army. On May 10th General Butler was badly beaten at Walthall Junction, andirs, asked if anything could be done to retard Butler's movements, stating that as Beauregard would to cover an army of 50,000 men, I pushed upon Butler's advance, had a sharp skirmish, and came near capturing a brigade and battery, and Butler withdrew. Some of Beauregard's troops drove him from te words: The President has ordered me to give Butler battle at once. It is against my judgment, ants while the enemy was escaping, and not until Butler was safe at Bermuda Hundreds did Beauregard reght, and could easily have been inflicted upon Butler. This, like other of his battles, was to be freds. I offered, for the purpose of attacking Butler, to send General Ransom with the field force h[7 more...]
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