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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 53
with a front sufficient to cover an army of 50,000 men, I pushed upon Butler's advance, had a sharp skirmish, and came near capturing a brigade and battery, and Butler withdrew. Some of Beauregard's troops drove him from the railroad and turnpike, at Port Walthall. Upon Beauregard's arrival at Petersburg he was given command as far north as to include Drury's Bluff. While lying near Drury's Bluff on the night of May gth, about ten o'clock, I got a despatch informing me of the fall of J. E. B. Stuart, mortally wounded, at Yellow Tavern, and that Sheridan was expected to assault the outer works north of Richmond, at dawn the next day. Immediately my two movable brigades, Gracie's and Fry's, and a light battery were hastened to and through Richmond, and I arrived with them at the fortifications on Mechanicsville turnpike just in time, the morning of May 10th, to see a battery of artillery there, unsupported by anything, repulse the advance of Sheridan. During the night the clerks an
William Miller Owen (search for this): chapter 53
mediate movement. General Beauregard said he was waiting to hear Whiting's guns, and had been expecting him for some time to approach on the Petersburg road. Soon after this the foe, in a straggling, disorganized manner, commenced crossing the road, moving to the east, which indicated a retreat, perhaps a purpose to turn our left and attack Fort Drury in rear. He placed a battery in the main road and threw some shells at our intrenchments, probably to cover his retiring troops. Colonel W. Miller Owen: In Camp and Battle. One of the enemy's solid shot struck at the very feet of President Davis as he stood at the edge of the turnpike in conversation with General Beauregard. They, without apparently noticing the close call, stepped slowly and deliberately out of range. The enemy's guns soon limbered up and moved off, and Butler was in full retreat to Bermuda Hundreds. On the next morning our troops moved down the river road as far as Howlett's, but saw no enemy. Gen
William Preston Johnston (search for this): chapter 53
ot struck at the very feet of President Davis as he stood at the edge of the turnpike in conversation with General Beauregard. They, without apparently noticing the close call, stepped slowly and deliberately out of range. The enemy's guns soon limbered up and moved off, and Butler was in full retreat to Bermuda Hundreds. On the next morning our troops moved down the river road as far as Howlett's, but saw no enemy. General Beauregard, President Davis, and his aide, Colonel William Preston Johnston, were standing on the earthworks listening intently. Presently a single gun was heard in the distance. Ah said Mr. Davis, at last! and a smile of satisfaction stole over his face. But that solitary gun was all, and Butler retreated unmolested to his lines at Bermuda Hundreds. Soon after the affair at Drury's Bluff, General Beauregard addressed to me a communication, proposing that he should be heavily reinforced from General Lee's army, so as to enable him to crush Bu
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 53
nner and shorter line, closer to the works at Drury's. On the afternoon of the 14th, wrote Mr. Davis, I rode down to visit General Beauregard. A letter from General Beauregard to Generalller Owen: In Camp and Battle. One of the enemy's solid shot struck at the very feet of President Davis as he stood at the edge of the turnpike in conversation with General Beauregard. They, witps moved down the river road as far as Howlett's, but saw no enemy. General Beauregard, President Davis, and his aide, Colonel William Preston Johnston, were standing on the earthworks listening intently. Presently a single gun was heard in the distance. Ah said Mr. Davis, at last! and a smile of satisfaction stole over his face. But that solitary gun was all, and Butler retreated unm General Lee's army, that he should join General Lee, crush Grant, and march to Washington. Mr. Davis, in Rise and Fall. The following is the communication alluded to above. Confederate Sta
T. B. Barton (search for this): chapter 53
ntrenched lines in the vicinity of Drury's Bluff. Butler moved forward again to confront them. General Robert Ransom said, in a monograph upon this battle: Beauregard, with headquarters at Charleston, had been urged to send up troops from his department, but none had arrived. Butler had moved up so as to cut the telegraph on the turnpike, and reach by a raiding party the railroad at Chester, during the first week in May. I was near Drury's Bluff with a battery of light guns and Barton's and Gracie's brigades, and our company of irregular cavalry. The President came to my camp, and finding out the state of affairs, asked if anything could be done to retard Butler's movements, stating that as Beauregard would not send troops, he had been peremptorily ordered to bring them, and that some were on the way. Knowing that audacity was my best arm, the next morning, with perfect leisure and with a front sufficient to cover an army of 50,000 men, I pushed upon Butler's advance, ha
try cartridges, and knowing that delay would mar the success gained, I sent instantly to Beauregard reporting what had happened, and asked that Ransom's brigade might come to me at once to continue the pressure and make good the advantage already gained. Beauregard refused. The ammunition being still delayed, I again begged that Ransom's brigade be sent me, but instead of that there came two small regiments from Georgia. Just as they reported to me the fog lifted, the enemy made a dash on Hoke's left and broke Hagood's brigade; but I threw these two Georgia regiments upon the advancing enemy, checked and repulsed him. After this I saw no more of the Georgia regiments, hearing however that by Beauregard's orders they had gone elsewhere. At this junction, and having been supplied ammunition, and while clearing away some trees that had luckily been felled by the enemy across the road, I got an order from Beauregard to advance by brigades in echelon, left in front. This movement was
the turning of his flank, and was preparing for retreat to within intrenchments while the enemy was escaping, and not until Butler was safe at Bermuda Hundreds did Beauregard realize that victory complete and crushing ought, and could easily have been inflicted upon Butler. This, like other of his battles, was to be fought over on paper to establish Beauregard's record. The sequel to the battle of Drury's Bluff was in keeping with Beauregard's efforts to father upon the true and gallant Ewell, Beauregard's shortcomings at First Manassas, when, utterly failing, they were laid upon an unknown and nameless courier; it is but another exemplification of that prolific incapacity which turned the rich fruit of the splendid genius of Sidney Johnston at Shiloh into bitter ashes. Our troops were then withdrawn to an inner and shorter line, closer to the works at Drury's. On the afternoon of the 14th, wrote Mr. Davis, I rode down to visit General Beauregard. A letter from G
Chapter 53: battle of Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864. Grant's plan of campaign was, if he should be unable to defeat Lee, or fail to take Richmond, to cross the James River below Richmond, and possess himself of Petersburg, cut off the supplies from the Confederate Capital, and, reinforced by Butler with 30,000 men, attack it from the south. Butler was ordered to concentrate his troops at City Point. From this base he was to destroy the railroad leading to Richmond. On May 7th he telegraphed he had destroyed many miles of railroad, and got a position which, with proper supplies, we can hold against Lee's whole army. On May 10th General Butler was badly beaten at Walthall Junction, and returned to his intrenched lines at Bermuda Hundreds. The Confederate troops which had been ordered from Charleston under Beauregard, on May 14th reached the intrenched lines in the vicinity of Drury's Bluff. Butler moved forward again to confront them. General Robert Ransom said, i
wing that delay would mar the success gained, I sent instantly to Beauregard reporting what had happened, and asked that Ransom's brigade might come to me at once to continue the pressure and make good the advantage already gained. Beauregard refused. The ammunition being still delayed, I again begged that Ransom's brigade be sent me, but instead of that there came two small regiments from Georgia. Just as they reported to me the fog lifted, the enemy made a dash on Hoke's left and broke Hagood's brigade; but I threw these two Georgia regiments upon the advancing enemy, checked and repulsed him. After this I saw no more of the Georgia regiments, hearing however that by Beauregard's orders they had gone elsewhere. At this junction, and having been supplied ammunition, and while clearing away some trees that had luckily been felled by the enemy across the road, I got an order from Beauregard to advance by brigades in echelon, left in front. This movement was begun, Gracie's brigade
dience to a despatch from him, at about 2 or 2.30 P. M., I met Beauregard at Major Drury's residence, about a mile from the Bluff. He was surrounded by a large stay 10 P. M., or a little later, I was in position in front of the breastworks on Drury's plantation. An independent regiment of cavalry was to move between me and thtroops were then withdrawn to an inner and shorter line, closer to the works at Drury's. On the afternoon of the 14th, wrote Mr. Davis, I rode down to visind unite with him in an attack upon Butler, wherever he should be found between Drury's and Petersburg. To this I offered distinct objection, because of the hazard, by Butler's advance. This march I supposed they could make so as to arrive at Drury's soon after daylight. The next day being Sunday, they could rest, and all thea concerted attack at daylight on Monday. On Monday morning, I rode down to Drury's, where I found that the enemy had seized our line of intrenchments, it being
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