hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 1,039 11 Browse Search
United States (United States) 542 0 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 325 1 Browse Search
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 190 22 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 186 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 172 0 Browse Search
James Grant 161 1 Browse Search
W. Porcher Miles 137 1 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Stateprisoner Davis 126 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

Found 193 total hits in 52 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Charleston, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
h, with proper supplies, we can hold against Lee's whole army. On May 10th General Butler was badly beaten at Walthall Junction, and returned to his intrenched lines at Bermuda Hundreds. The Confederate troops which had been ordered from Charleston under Beauregard, on May 14th reached the intrenched lines in the vicinity of Drury's Bluff. Butler moved forward again to confront them. General Robert Ransom said, in a monograph upon this battle: Beauregard, with headquarters at Charleston, had been urged to send up troops from his department, but none had arrived. Butler had moved up so as to cut the telegraph on the turnpike, and reach by a raiding party the railroad at Chester, during the first week in May. I was near Drury's Bluff with a battery of light guns and Barton's and Gracie's brigades, and our company of irregular cavalry. The President came to my camp, and finding out the state of affairs, asked if anything could be done to retard Butler's movements, st
Kingsland Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
I must hold it in case of disaster. My staff, couriers, and horses were in Richmond, and were sent for ; there was not a wagon to my division. Everything that I could do was done to be ready. By sundown staff and horses had arrived, and by 10 P. M., or a little later, I was in position in front of the breastworks on Drury's plantation. An independent regiment of cavalry was to move between me and the river, for information. At the first glimpse of daylight I moved to the south of Kingsland Creek, and at once pushed upon the enemy. A dense fog had suddenly enveloped everything. The skirmishers were quickly engaged, and immediately a general infantry fire. The fighting was pressed to conclusion, and by sunrise I had captured a brigade of infantry and a battery of artillery, and swept and occupied about three-quarters of a mile of the enemy's temporary breastworks, which were strengthened by wire interwoven among the trees in their front; not however without considerable loss a
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
sas, when, utterly failing, they were laid upon an unknown and nameless courier; it is but another exemplification of that prolific incapacity which turned the rich fruit of the splendid genius of Sidney Johnston at Shiloh into bitter ashes. Our troops were then withdrawn to an inner and shorter line, closer to the works at Drury's. On the afternoon of the 14th, wrote Mr. Davis, I rode down to visit General Beauregard. A letter from General Beauregard to General Bragg, dated Weldon, April 29th, gave the names of the Federal generals commanding forces on the Southern coast. The arrival, he said, of any of these officers in Virginia would indicate the transfer of their troops thither, and concluded by saying that if it were desired he should operate on the north side of James River, maps ought to be prepared for him, and timbers, etc., for bridges; and that he would serve with pleasure under the immediate command of General Lee, aiding him to crush our enemies, and to a
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
s face. But that solitary gun was all, and Butler retreated unmolested to his lines at Bermuda Hundreds. Soon after the affair at Drury's Bluff, General Beauregard addressed to me a communication, proposing that he should be heavily reinforced from General Lee's army, so as to enable him to crush Butler in his intrenchments, and then, with the main body of his own force, together with the detachment from General Lee's army, that he should join General Lee, crush Grant, and march to Washington. Mr. Davis, in Rise and Fall. The following is the communication alluded to above. Confederate States, Headquarters Department North and South Carolina and Virginia, Hancock House, May 18, 1864, 9.30 P. M. Memorandum: The crisis demands prompt and decisive action. For this, the two armies are now too far apart, unless we consent to give up Petersburg, and place the capital in jeopardy. If General Lee will fall back behind the Chickahominy, engaging the enemy so as to draw h
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 53
Soon after the affair at Drury's Bluff, General Beauregard addressed to me a communication, proposing that he should be heavily reinforced from General Lee's army, so as to enable him to crush Butler in his intrenchments, and then, with the main body of his own force, together with the detachment from General Lee's army, that he should join General Lee, crush Grant, and march to Washington. Mr. Davis, in Rise and Fall. The following is the communication alluded to above. Confederate States, Headquarters Department North and South Carolina and Virginia, Hancock House, May 18, 1864, 9.30 P. M. Memorandum: The crisis demands prompt and decisive action. For this, the two armies are now too far apart, unless we consent to give up Petersburg, and place the capital in jeopardy. If General Lee will fall back behind the Chickahominy, engaging the enemy so as to draw him on, General Beauregard can bring up fifteen thousand men to unite with Breckenridge and fall upon the ene
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
Chapter 53: battle of Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864. Grant's plan of campaign was, if he should be unable to defeat Lee, or fail to take Richmond, to cross the James River below Richmond, and possess himself of Petersburg, cut off the supplies from the Confederate Capital, and, reinforced by Butler with 30,000 men, attack it from the south. Butler was ordered to concentrate his troops at City Point. From this base he was to destroy the railroad leading to Richmond. On May 7th he telegraphed he had destroyed many miles of railroad, and got a position which, with proper supplies, we can hold against Lee's whole army. On May 10th General Butler was badly beaten at Walthall Junction, and returned to his intrenched lines at Bermuda Hundreds. The Confederate troops which had been ordered from Charleston under Beauregard, on May 14th reached the intrenched lines in the vicinity of Drury's Bluff. Butler moved forward again to confront them. General Robert Ransom said, in
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
to me at once to continue the pressure and make good the advantage already gained. Beauregard refused. The ammunition being still delayed, I again begged that Ransom's brigade be sent me, but instead of that there came two small regiments from Georgia. Just as they reported to me the fog lifted, the enemy made a dash on Hoke's left and broke Hagood's brigade; but I threw these two Georgia regiments upon the advancing enemy, checked and repulsed him. After this I saw no more of the Georgia reGeorgia regiments upon the advancing enemy, checked and repulsed him. After this I saw no more of the Georgia regiments, hearing however that by Beauregard's orders they had gone elsewhere. At this junction, and having been supplied ammunition, and while clearing away some trees that had luckily been felled by the enemy across the road, I got an order from Beauregard to advance by brigades in echelon, left in front. This movement was begun, Gracie's brigade leading and I with it. After advancing some distance I heard firing to right and rear, and galloping in that direction to ascertain its cause, fail
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
m his present position. For three days, perhaps four, Petersburg and Richmond can be held by the forces left behind; not longer. Without such concentration nothing decisive can be effected, and the picture presented is one of starvation. Without it General Lee must eventually fall back before Grant's heavy reinforcements, and the view presented merely anticipates this movement for offensive purposes. Meantime it is impossible to effectually protect our lines of communication with North Carolina; and impossible to hold our present line in front of Butler with a much reduced force. At present three thousand men can be spared with safety. Day after to-morrow two thousand more, perhaps, as our lines will probably be stronger, if, as we expect, the forward line can be occupied to-day. (Signed) P. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. Endorsement on the above: General Bragg, Commanding, etc., etc. This memorandum was handed to me this day by Colonel Melton, A. & I. General'
Chester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
ederate troops which had been ordered from Charleston under Beauregard, on May 14th reached the intrenched lines in the vicinity of Drury's Bluff. Butler moved forward again to confront them. General Robert Ransom said, in a monograph upon this battle: Beauregard, with headquarters at Charleston, had been urged to send up troops from his department, but none had arrived. Butler had moved up so as to cut the telegraph on the turnpike, and reach by a raiding party the railroad at Chester, during the first week in May. I was near Drury's Bluff with a battery of light guns and Barton's and Gracie's brigades, and our company of irregular cavalry. The President came to my camp, and finding out the state of affairs, asked if anything could be done to retard Butler's movements, stating that as Beauregard would not send troops, he had been peremptorily ordered to bring them, and that some were on the way. Knowing that audacity was my best arm, the next morning, with perfect leis
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 53
s Department, and is referred to you for attention. General Lee is best informed of his situation, and his ability is too well established to incline me to adopt the opinion of anyone at a distance as to the movements which his army should make, either for its preservation or the protection of its communications. If fifteen thousand men can be spared for the flank movement proposed, certainly ten thousand may be sent to reinforce General Lee. If that be done immediately, General Lee's correspondence warrants the belief that he will defeat the enemy in Northern Virginia, The advantage of that result of our success against a besieging army around Richmond is obvious. (Signed) Jefferson Davis. May 19, 1864. Military courtesy required that the memoranda should be sent to General Lee, who, as soon as its purport was communicated to him, ordered General Beauregard to straighten his line, so as to reduce the number of men required to hold it, and send the remainder to him.
1 2 3 4 5 6