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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 70
found to mean myself) as desired to see him would call at his office. To which I answered, that I thought illness and my circumstances constituted an extraordinary case; but that I was sorry to have asked anything which he felt called upon so curtly to refuse. On the following day I went, accompanied by General Hugh Mercer. Need I say that General — did himself justice, and verified my preconceived opinion of him in our interview, in which he told me he guessed I could not telegraph to Washington, write to the heads of departments there, or to anybody, except through the regular channel approved; and I could not write to my friends, except through the Provost-Marshal's office; and that I was permitted to pay my expenses, but must remain within the limits of Savannah. With many thanks for this large liberty accorded so graciously, I bowed myself out, first having declined to get soldiers' rations by application for them to this Government. In this condition I remained for m
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 70
n, which gives enough of the details of our travels. After this time I wrote often to the good doctor. Mill View (Near Augusta, Ga.), October 10, 1865. Colonel John J. Craven: I dread paralysis for him, his nerves have been so highly strung fr distressing a woman, or a fiend, if it took that shape, but made application the next day for permission to go away to Augusta; was refused, and then prepared the children to go where they would not see such people. Hourly scenes of violence wtle weak baby (you see I am very honest with you) to make my escape out of the country to them; but when, upon coming to Augusta — which General Steadman gave me leave to do immediately upon his accession to command — through the very kind intercesscollects near the gate of our house. Under the kind treatment I have received, the fine country air (five miles from Augusta), and the privacy, I have also grown much better; can sleep and eat, and begin to feel alive again with the frosty air,
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 70
the righteous judge; repentance working deliverance to an oppressed and dispersed people; the prayers of the Church affecting the miraculous preservation of one apostle from the fate which had a short time before fallen upon another. I could not write daily as you wish, because I am not allowed to keep stationery. When it is specially granted it has to be accounted for, the whole being returned written or blank, as may be. With you it is otherwise, and the Attorney-General will probably indulge us by forwarding your letters as often as you write. His past courtesy warrants such expectation William B. Reed, of Philadelphia, recently tendered to me his professional services in a very kind and handsome letter. Thomas J. Wharton, C. E. Hooker, and Fulton Anderson, are the Mississippi lawyers who offered their services and were recognized as counsel by the United States Secretary of State. I requested permission to acknowledge their kindness by a letter; it was not granted.
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 70
ys been an attack of amaurosis, and in one of them he lost his eye. It first came on with an attack of acute neuralgia. When he was taken from me on the ship, the provost-guard and some women detectives came on board, and after the women searched our persons, the men searched our baggage. They then told my servants that they could go ashore if they did not desire to go to Savannah. The husband of my faithful colored nurse forced her to go. I entreated to be permitted to debark at Charleston, as my sister, Miss Howell, still continued to be ill, and I feared to return on the ship with a drunken purser, who had previously required Colonel Pritchard's authority to keep him in order; and going back, Mrs. Clay, my sister, and myself would be the only women on the ship-but this was refused. Acting as my own chambermaid and nurse, and the nurse also of my sister, we started for Savannah. We had a fearful gale, in which the upper decks once or twice dipped water, and no one could w
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 70
Chapter 70: account of journey to Savannah. Letter to Dr. Craven. I wrote to Mr. Davis, hoping from the youth of Gethat they could go ashore if they did not desire to go to Savannah. The husband of my faithful colored nurse forced her to nd nurse, and the nurse also of my sister, we started for Savannah. We had a fearful gale, in which the upper decks once or displayed the good hearts of my children. Arrived at Savannah, we trudged up to the hotel quite in emigrant fashion. Mt de corps, and then from kind feeling. The people of Savannah treated me with the greatest tenderness. Had I been a sie the night before that I could not be permitted to leave Savannah, and having been robbed of nearly all my means, I could n to pay my expenses, but must remain within the limits of Savannah. With many thanks for this large liberty accorded so r, and loving words, and letters which meet me here as in Savannah. The whole Southern country teems with homes the door
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 70
ld Billy was taught to sing, We'll hang Jeff Davis on a sour apple-tree, by giving him a reward when he did so. The little thing finally told me one day, You thinks I'se somebody; so is you; so is father; but you is not; so is not any of us but me. I am a Yankee every time. The rough soldiers, doubtless, meant to be kind, but such things wounded me to the quick. They took him and made him snatch apples off the stalls, if Robert lost sight of him for a moment. Finally, two women from Maine contemplated whipping him, because they found out that he was his father's son; but a man took them off just in time to avoid a very painful scene to them as well as to me. These things went on in the street — I refer only to the street-teachings — as these women were, with one other, dishonorable exceptions to the ladies in the house. Once, when our little boy Jeff had been most violently assailed by an officer's wife in the house, he came up with his face covered with tears after havin
Jeff Davis (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 70
advice, relieved me; and I have thanked God nightly for your brave humanity. Though I ate, slept, and lived in my room, rarely or never going out in the day, and only walking out late at night, with Robert for protection, I could not keep my little ones so closely confined. Little Jeff and Billy went out on the street to play, and there Jeff was constantly told that he was rich; that his father had stolen eight millions, etc. Little two-year-old Billy was taught to sing, We'll hang Jeff Davis on a sour apple-tree, by giving him a reward when he did so. The little thing finally told me one day, You thinks I'se somebody; so is you; so is father; but you is not; so is not any of us but me. I am a Yankee every time. The rough soldiers, doubtless, meant to be kind, but such things wounded me to the quick. They took him and made him snatch apples off the stalls, if Robert lost sight of him for a moment. Finally, two women from Maine contemplated whipping him, because they fou
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 70
so precious to them and to me, that I cannot realize I do not know them intimately. Mr. Davis should dismiss all fears for me. I only suffer for him. I do not meet a young man who fails to put himself at my disposal to go anywhere for me. I cannot pay a doctor's bill, or buy of an apothecary. All things are added unto me. If I have written too long a letter, my dear sir, it is because I have not collected my facts, but sought quid scribam, non quem ad modum. Varina Davis. Fortress Monroe, Va., October 2, 1865. My days drag heavily on. To what, I have no means to direct, or to foresee. Having no communication with the outer world except with you, and in that restricted by the judgment of the Commanding Officer as to what should be sent. The example you give will illustrate. The new overcoat I have not received, though, probably, when the statement was published on which you relied as telling at least one fact, it had reached this post. The matter being of such public
France (France) (search for this): chapter 70
ut when, upon coming to Augusta — which General Steadman gave me leave to do immediately upon his accession to command — through the very kind intercession of General Brannen, who succeeded General Birge--I was informed by a gentleman, who said he had been told so authoritatively, that if I ever quitted the country for any possible object, I would — no matter what befell Mr. Davisnever be allowed to return; and then abandoned the intention. My baby has grown fat and rosy as the Glory of France, a rose which Mr. Davis recollects near the gate of our house. Under the kind treatment I have received, the fine country air (five miles from Augusta), and the privacy, I have also grown much better; can sleep and eat, and begin to feel alive again with the frosty air, and loving words, and letters which meet me here as in Savannah. The whole Southern country teems with homes the doors of which open wide to receive me; and the people are so loving, talk with such streaming eyes and <
Hugh Mercer (search for this): chapter 70
e, but whose orthography was very bad, was directed to tell me that, except under very extraordinary circumstances, he did not go out of his office, and all such (which I afterward found to mean myself) as desired to see him would call at his office. To which I answered, that I thought illness and my circumstances constituted an extraordinary case; but that I was sorry to have asked anything which he felt called upon so curtly to refuse. On the following day I went, accompanied by General Hugh Mercer. Need I say that General — did himself justice, and verified my preconceived opinion of him in our interview, in which he told me he guessed I could not telegraph to Washington, write to the heads of departments there, or to anybody, except through the regular channel approved; and I could not write to my friends, except through the Provost-Marshal's office; and that I was permitted to pay my expenses, but must remain within the limits of Savannah. With many thanks for this larg
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