hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 1,039 11 Browse Search
United States (United States) 542 0 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 325 1 Browse Search
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 190 22 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 186 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 172 0 Browse Search
James Grant 161 1 Browse Search
W. Porcher Miles 137 1 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Stateprisoner Davis 126 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

Found 115 total hits in 52 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
William H. Seward (search for this): chapter 72
veness on the ground of true repentance, and as we cannot tell, in the case of those who trespass against us, whether the repentance is true or feigned, we are bound to accept the seeming. This is possible, but is not easy for virtue far short of the God-like or saintly examples of the Redeemer, the first Christian Martyr. From Mr. Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 24, 1866. Judge Campbell, I have been told, wrote a full account of the interview with Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Seward, and that it has been published in the Northern papers. Mr. Hunter promised me to write such a statement. The stories told of Mr. Stephens are improbable, because the meanest capacity must perceive that my powers and duties rested on the organization made by the Southern States, and that it would have been treasonable usurpation to attempt to destroy the organization by the exercise offunctions given to maintain it. When the Continental Congress sent Commissioners to meet Lord Howe, who
Bradley T. Johnson (search for this): chapter 72
cessary to a historian as to an attorney, and I hope the faculty will be put in exercise proportionate to the field our time has offered The New York paper containing an account of the interview between the South Carolina committee and President Johnson, was handed to me soon after its publication. I did not credit the statement, because I was sure you had not in such correspondence given expression to your personal feelings. Mr. Davis refers to a misstatement of President Johnson, thaPresident Johnson, that I had written him offensive letters, when I had never written him but one, and that was an application to be allowed to go to my husband, and this was couched in respectful terms and handed to him by Francis P. Blair, who would not have done anything to injure me To all the trials, mental and physical, to which I am subjected I will oppose all the moral power I possess, that my life may be prolonged as far as such drains will permit, and my power to meet any future ordeal be as great as
Samuel Cooper (search for this): chapter 72
, but of condemnation and punishment. From President Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe,Va., February 17, 1866. 19th day. Mrs. Clay, after her return to Washington, sent me a coffee-pot, to enable me to make coffee for myself. Dr. Cooper came and gave me full instructions as to its use, making very good coffee as a part of the lecture. I have followed directions not with the best success; indeed, I am led to doubt whether cooking was designed to be my vocation. This little this fleeting life Often has it occurred in the world's history that fidelity has been treated as a crime, and true faith punished as treason. So it cannot be before the Judge to whom all hearts arc open, from whom no secrets are hid. Dr. Cooper has just been here to visit me, he says all which is needful for me is air and exercise. It was the want which Cowper's bird had, and hardly had bird more usually sought for air and motion than I did when I had Byron's Heritage of woe. But I
A. H. Stephens (search for this): chapter 72
or feigned, we are bound to accept the seeming. This is possible, but is not easy for virtue far short of the God-like or saintly examples of the Redeemer, the first Christian Martyr. From Mr. Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 24, 1866. Judge Campbell, I have been told, wrote a full account of the interview with Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Seward, and that it has been published in the Northern papers. Mr. Hunter promised me to write such a statement. The stories told of Mr. Stephens are improbable, because the meanest capacity must perceive that my powers and duties rested on the organization made by the Southern States, and that it would have been treasonable usurpation to attempt to destroy the organization by the exercise offunctions given to maintain it. When the Continental Congress sent Commissioners to meet Lord Howe, who had announced himself as empowered to treat for the adjustment of the controversy between the States and Great Britain, the Commissioners,
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 72
gain, any dolt whose blunders necessitated frequent conviction, and whose vanity sought for someone on whom to lay the responsibility of his failures, could readily, and if mean enough would now, ascribe them to me. Things done against my known views, and of which explanations were written to me when success was expected to result from the change of plan, have lately been attributed to my orders. Beauregard, Hood, Hardee, and Cobb know of a case in point, memorable by its consequences. Generals Lee and Bragg could give the history of the two largest armies. I never sought to make up my own record, intent on the discharge of my duties in the various public positions I have held. If the question had occurred to me, how will this be told hereafter? I would have preferred to leave that task to others. Nor is the hazard great, for the dependence of the parts of a whole will generally correct the perversions of recital by interested narrators. That power to compare and sift testi
Reverdy Johnson (search for this): chapter 72
d and injustice, I am supported by the conscious rectitude of my course, and humbly acknowledging my many and grievous sins against God, can confidently look to His righteous judgment for vindication in the matters whereof I am accused by man. From Mr. Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe, January 28, 1866. Did you ever hear that Colonel MacCree refused to dine with the Duke of Wellington? He, of course, gave no reason on that occasion, but it was well understood to be or mine. President Johnson afterward acknowledged to the Honorable Reverdy Johnson, that he had made a misstatement in answer to my application for a copy of the putative letter. on account of the treatment received by Napoleon after his surrender. It is not long since a newspaper paragraphist would have been rebuked by public opinion if he had attempted, by epithets and one-sided statements, to inflame the mind of his readers against a prisoner waiting a trial; but that would have been a small offence com
eply, slanders have worked without check, and have no doubt deceived many. Again, any dolt whose blunders necessitated frequent conviction, and whose vanity sought for someone on whom to lay the responsibility of his failures, could readily, and if mean enough would now, ascribe them to me. Things done against my known views, and of which explanations were written to me when success was expected to result from the change of plan, have lately been attributed to my orders. Beauregard, Hood, Hardee, and Cobb know of a case in point, memorable by its consequences. Generals Lee and Bragg could give the history of the two largest armies. I never sought to make up my own record, intent on the discharge of my duties in the various public positions I have held. If the question had occurred to me, how will this be told hereafter? I would have preferred to leave that task to others. Nor is the hazard great, for the dependence of the parts of a whole will generally correct the perversions
Given Campbell (search for this): chapter 72
bound to accept the seeming. This is possible, but is not easy for virtue far short of the God-like or saintly examples of the Redeemer, the first Christian Martyr. From Mr. Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 24, 1866. Judge Campbell, I have been told, wrote a full account of the interview with Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Seward, and that it has been published in the Northern papers. Mr. Hunter promised me to write such a statement. The stories told of Mr. Stephens are improbabence, it was not competent for the Congress to return them to a state of dependence. In both cases, there was an obvious mode, but it was adopted in neither, viz., to suspend hostilities and submit propositions to be laid before the States. Judge Campbell mache an inquiry which opened, and received an answer which closed, that view. I suppose it is narrated in his stlaement. It was not, but much was narrated which inflamed the public against the hapless prisoner. Excluded from an opportuni
an, and therefore formed him for companionship with nature, and endowed his soul with capacity to feed on hopes which live beyond this fleeting life Often has it occurred in the world's history that fidelity has been treated as a crime, and true faith punished as treason. So it cannot be before the Judge to whom all hearts arc open, from whom no secrets are hid. Dr. Cooper has just been here to visit me, he says all which is needful for me is air and exercise. It was the want which Cowper's bird had, and hardly had bird more usually sought for air and motion than I did when I had Byron's Heritage of woe. But I am not of Cato's creed, and do not hold that it is man's wisdom to equal the swallow, but man's dignity to bear up against trials under which the lower animals would sink. Resolution of will may not, according to Father Timon, prolong indefinitely our earthly existence, but it will do much to sustain the tottering machine beyond the observer's calculation. 23d. Y
before the Judge to whom all hearts arc open, from whom no secrets are hid. Dr. Cooper has just been here to visit me, he says all which is needful for me is air and exercise. It was the want which Cowper's bird had, and hardly had bird more usually sought for air and motion than I did when I had Byron's Heritage of woe. But I am not of Cato's creed, and do not hold that it is man's wisdom to equal the swallow, but man's dignity to bear up against trials under which the lower animals would sink. Resolution of will may not, according to Father Timon, prolong indefinitely our earthly existence, but it will do much to sustain the tottering machine beyond the observer's calculation. 23d. You can imagine how one, shut out from all direct communication with his friends, dwells upon every shadow and longs for light. Yesterday my walk was extended to two hours, and I hope for the continuance of the extension, as the good doctor has urged the necessity for more air and exercise.
1 2 3 4 5 6