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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
the neuralgia of the head sometimes renders me almost blind during the paroxysm. I recollect Frederick Maginnis A colored man who was a courteous, refined gentleman in his instincts. He offered his services to me gratuitously in Georgia, which were accepted on the usual terms of remuneration, and he was a second providence to us by his care of Mr. Davis after I was allowed to go to him. He afterward married my maid, who was as dear as she was faithful to me, and they both live now in Baltimore, respected by all who know them. very well; first met him at Manassas, and had a very favorable opinion of him. The Quadrilateral was handed to me and I soon found, what was not told, that it had been sent by you. The writer has attempted the very difficult task of portraying the inconsistencies of human nature. Sir Walter Scott alone has succeeded in doing it. We have as much in real life as anyone can need, and in fiction we might be treated to pictures harmonized in coloring. The
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
ungry for the children's little faces, and have habitually to resist the power of tender feelings which may not be gratified. To look only to those hopes of which man cannot deprive me, and to such relief as a record may afford, in the event to which my enemies refer as a means, not of learning the truth and doing justice, but of condemnation and punishment. From President Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe,Va., February 17, 1866. 19th day. Mrs. Clay, after her return to Washington, sent me a coffee-pot, to enable me to make coffee for myself. Dr. Cooper came and gave me full instructions as to its use, making very good coffee as a part of the lecture. I have followed directions not with the best success; indeed, I am led to doubt whether cooking was designed to be my vocation. This little coffee-pot is now in my possession. In his first effort at cooking he wrenched off the soldered top instead of taking off the dripper, and he gently and apologetically explai
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
will this be told hereafter? I would have preferred to leave that task to others. Nor is the hazard great, for the dependence of the parts of a whole will generally correct the perversions of recital by interested narrators. That power to compare and sift testimony is as necessary to a historian as to an attorney, and I hope the faculty will be put in exercise proportionate to the field our time has offered The New York paper containing an account of the interview between the South Carolina committee and President Johnson, was handed to me soon after its publication. I did not credit the statement, because I was sure you had not in such correspondence given expression to your personal feelings. Mr. Davis refers to a misstatement of President Johnson, that I had written him offensive letters, when I had never written him but one, and that was an application to be allowed to go to my husband, and this was couched in respectful terms and handed to him by Francis P. Blair,
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
es harmonized in coloring. The disclosure of Ida's secret, and the slaughter of prisoners who had laid down their arms, could not have been done by one as true and generous and brave as the hero is represented. The horse is the best character in the book, as I measure them. Do you recollect Old Duke the horse I rode in the Pawnee campaign? He might have stood for the portrait, except that even in extreme age he was not gentle. Fortress Monroe, Va., March 13, 1866. Your reception at Macon was such as I anticipated from my own experience, and it is so much the more valuable because those friends have little demonstrativeness and no insincerity. The kind manifestations mentioned by you as made by the negro servants, are not less touching than those of more cultivated people. I liked them, and am gratified by their friendly remembrance. Whatever may be the result of the present experiment, the former relation of the races was one which could only incite to harshness a very b
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 72
The stories told of Mr. Stephens are improbable, because the meanest capacity must perceive that my powers and duties rested on the organization made by the Southern States, and that it would have been treasonable usurpation to attempt to destroy the organization by the exercise offunctions given to maintain it. When the Continental Congress sent Commissioners to meet Lord Howe, who had announced himself as empowered to treat for the adjustment of the controversy between the States and Great Britain, the Commissioners, on learning that the basis must be a return to allegiance, informed his Lordship that the Colonies having declared their independence, it was not competent for the Congress to return them to a state of dependence. In both cases, there was an obvious mode, but it was adopted in neither, viz., to suspend hostilities and submit propositions to be laid before the States. Judge Campbell mache an inquiry which opened, and received an answer which closed, that view. I sup
Binghamton (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
justly or generously made I feel deeply indebted to Dr. Craven and the ladies of his family for a benevolence which had much to suppress, and nothing selfish to excite, it, and but for which my captivity would soon have ended in death. The letter from my little Polly is a sweet, graceful image of her honest, affectionate heart. I am sure she will be a comfort and honor to her family in after-years. Fortress Monroe, April 21, 1866. The young soldier who saw you in the cars at Binghamton reported the interview, and described how bright and wideawake little Winnie was. It was a great pleasure to me to hear an eye-witness. The weather is quite warm, the earth is clothed in her bright robes of promise, the birds sing joyously, and I will not, like the Bard of Avon, complain that they are so tuneful while I so weary fu‘ oa care. Though not the voice I long to hear, I draw from it the pleasure it was designed to give by the bounteous Creator, who did not mean that man's h
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
ot is now in my possession. In his first effort at cooking he wrenched off the soldered top instead of taking off the dripper, and he gently and apologetically explained, I did not learn to cook early enough. My eyes do not suffer much from inflammation; but the neuralgia of the head sometimes renders me almost blind during the paroxysm. I recollect Frederick Maginnis A colored man who was a courteous, refined gentleman in his instincts. He offered his services to me gratuitously in Georgia, which were accepted on the usual terms of remuneration, and he was a second providence to us by his care of Mr. Davis after I was allowed to go to him. He afterward married my maid, who was as dear as she was faithful to me, and they both live now in Baltimore, respected by all who know them. very well; first met him at Manassas, and had a very favorable opinion of him. The Quadrilateral was handed to me and I soon found, what was not told, that it had been sent by you. The writer has
Le Roy (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
I will yet hope, though in patience, and strive to find adequate protection beneath the shield of the conviction that all things are ordered in wisdom and mercy and love, that I may fully feel, Even so, father, for it is Thy will. In all the affairs of life we are reduced to choosing between evils, every situation having its disadvantages. You recollect the instructive satire of Horace on the desire for change, etc. Remember me most affectionately to Ma. Tell her that the old one hit Le Roy at last, but that his faith held out and he never cried quarter. If my letter seems disjointed and obscure, do not infer any physical ill as the cause. The tramping and creaking of the sentinel's boots disturb me so as to render it difficult to write at all. Fortress Monroe, March 22, 1866. I am in the condition to give the highest value to quiet, it being the thing never allowed to me by day or night. The spring is slowly appearing and, as well as the calendar, reminds me of
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
Chapter 72: letters from Fortress Monroe. From Mr. Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe, Fortress Monroe, Va., January 16, 1866. I had feared that our negroes would be disturbed by the introduction of otartyr. From Mr. Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 24, 1866. Judge Campbell, I by man. From Mr. Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe, January 28, 1866. Did you ever hear the form or the end of the afflictions. Fortress Monroe, Va., February 3, 1866. Men turn to the From President Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe,Va., February 17, 1866. 19th day. Mn in extreme age he was not gentle. Fortress Monroe, Va., March 13, 1866. Your reception at Mto render it difficult to write at all. Fortress Monroe, March 22, 1866. I am in the conditionration compatible with their position. Fortress Monroe, Va., April 8, 1866. Next to the consciou and honor to her family in after-years. Fortress Monroe, April 21, 1866. The young soldier who
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
rfect sleep which we call Death. To use your expressive phrase, I am hungry for the children's little faces, and have habitually to resist the power of tender feelings which may not be gratified. To look only to those hopes of which man cannot deprive me, and to such relief as a record may afford, in the event to which my enemies refer as a means, not of learning the truth and doing justice, but of condemnation and punishment. From President Davis to Mrs. Davis. Fortress Monroe,Va., February 17, 1866. 19th day. Mrs. Clay, after her return to Washington, sent me a coffee-pot, to enable me to make coffee for myself. Dr. Cooper came and gave me full instructions as to its use, making very good coffee as a part of the lecture. I have followed directions not with the best success; indeed, I am led to doubt whether cooking was designed to be my vocation. This little coffee-pot is now in my possession. In his first effort at cooking he wrenched off the soldered top
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