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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
vis, in which the former charges the latter with having threatened to force certain States to remain in the Confederacy, it has been stated that Davis's letter, containing this threat, was written to Governor Vance, now United States Senator, in reply to his letter to President Davis of October 25, 1862. It has been stated also that the letter of Davis had been destroyed. This is a mistake; the letter is here, and is now in the possession of a gentleman of Raleigh. It is as follows: Richmond, Va., November 11, 1862. To his Excellency Governor Vance, Raleigh, N. C. Dear Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge yours of the 25th ult., and regret the disappointment to which some of the recruits of North Carolina have been subjected. I concur with you as to the policy of allowing the conscripts, as far as the state of the service will permit, to select the companies and regiments in which they are to serve. The right secured by law of a volunteer to select his own company was lost,
) (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
he use of your columns to notice only so much as particularly refers to myself, and which is to be found in the following extract; The following is from the Globe-Democrat's report: Referring to the late war, he said, it was not, as was generally understood, a war of secession from the United States, but a conspiracy. I have been behind the curtain, said he, and I have seen letters that few others have seen and have heard conversations that cannot be repeated; and I tell you that Jeff Davis never was a secessionist. He was a conspirator. He did not care for division from the United States, his object was to get a fulcrum from which to operate against the Northern States, and if he had succeeded, he would to-day be the master spirit of the continent, and you would be slaves. I have seen a letter from Jefferson Davis to a man whose name I cannot mention, because he is a United States Senator. I know Davis's writing, and saw his signature, and in that letter he said he would
Biloxi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
rted to have made allegations, hereinafter quoted by Mr. Davis in a letter characterizing those statements. General Sherman's remarks were published in the Globe-Democrat of St. Louis, and Mr. Davis wrote the following letter of denial: Beauvoir, Miss., November 6, 1884. Editor St. Louis Republican: Dear Sir: I have to-night received the enclosed published account of remarks made by General W. T. Sherman, and ask the use of your columns to notice only so much as particularly refers to m impartial seeker after truth will find and proclaim it. When the passions of the day have died out with the august figures that have passed, posterity will do justice. Mr. Davis thus wrote to one of the Senators voting in the negative. Beauvoir, Miss., January 30, 1885. Honorable -- , United States Senate. my dear Sir: accept my thanks for your defence of me against slanderous accusations, and equally are they tendered for your vindication of our people against allegations alike unfoun
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
erer. Yours respectfully, Jefferson Davis. In reply to the above letter, General Sherman is reported to have said: It was a matter between two gentlemen, and he would take his own time about replying to Mr. Davis. He would reply in time, and Mr. Davis would be accommodated with facts. He would not give the name of the United States Senator who had received that important letter from Mr. Davis. He said later on, that the letter had been burned with others of his papers at Chicago. Senator Vance being very positive that he could not have been the one referred to by General Sherman in his statement, authorized the following publication in the St. Louis Globe-Democrat: Washington, D. C., December 14th. Every letter ever written to me on a political topic by President Davis is to be found faithfully copied on the official letter-books of the Executive Department of North Carolina. Those letter-books were taken from me by General Sherman's troops at the closing
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 79
enerally understood, a war of secession from the United States, but a conspiracy. I have been behind the curtaspirator. He did not care for division from the United States, his object was to get a fulcrum from which to oman whose name I cannot mention, because he is a United States Senator. I know Davis's writing, and saw his si it is based upon information which regard for a United States Senator does not permit him to present, will, tod with facts. He would not give the name of the United States Senator who had received that important letter f this threat, was written to Governor Vance, now United States Senator, in reply to his letter to President Davry 16, 1885, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States, in answer to a Senate resolution, January 13, 1 Mr. Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States, was taken up. Senator Vance said that athat he had seen a letter addressed to one now a United States Senator, which he knew to be in my handwriting a
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
disposition to load him with all the misfortunes of defeat. Mr. Davis to Governor Vance. Raleigh, N. C., December 14th. In reference to the recent controversy between General Sherman and Jefferstroyed. This is a mistake; the letter is here, and is now in the possession of a gentleman of Raleigh. It is as follows: Richmond, Va., November 11, 1862. To his Excellency Governor Vance, RaleigRaleigh, N. C. Dear Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge yours of the 25th ult., and regret the disappointment to which some of the recruits of North Carolina have been subjected. I concur with you as tthe line would conclude the matter, but it seemed he was mistaken. General Sherman said: At Raleigh a mass of public records had been carried off; yet a number were left behind at the State Housewn to such as were deemed of sufficient importance. Among the books collected at the Palace in Raleigh was a clerk's or secretary's copy-book containing loose sheets and letters, among which was the
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 79
lying to Mr. Davis. He would reply in time, and Mr. Davis would be accommodated with facts. He would not give the name of the United States Senator who had received that important letter from Mr. Davis. He said later on, that the letter had been burned with others of his papers at Chicago. Senator Vance being very positive that he could not have been the one referred to by General Sherman in his statement, authorized the following publication in the St. Louis Globe-Democrat: Washington, D. C., December 14th. Every letter ever written to me on a political topic by President Davis is to be found faithfully copied on the official letter-books of the Executive Department of North Carolina. Those letter-books were taken from me by General Sherman's troops at the closing of the war, and are now in possession of the War Department in this city. Aside from the letter-books, General Sherman never saw any letter addressed to me by President Davis. Although I have not seen those
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
topic by President Davis is to be found faithfully copied on the official letter-books of the Executive Department of North Carolina. Those letter-books were taken from me by General Sherman's troops at the closing of the war, and are now in possess have the honor to acknowledge yours of the 25th ult., and regret the disappointment to which some of the recruits of North Carolina have been subjected. I concur with you as to the policy of allowing the conscripts, as far as the state of the serviy answer. I am quite sure that we generally thought it was the desire of Governor Vance and of the officials to take North Carolina out of the Confederacy, as I have stated, but they were afraid of Jefferson Davis, and wanted protection. Concerni from President Davis to him of any nature were to be found copied in the letter-books of the Executive Department of North Carolina, which books were now in the War Department. The reasons given by General Sherman to corroborate his statement we
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
is's antagonists in the North assailed him. At a meeting of the Frank P. Blair Post, Grand Army of the Republic, in St. Louis in 1884, General Sherman was reported to have made allegations, hereinafter quoted by Mr. Davis in a letter characterizing those statements. General Sherman's remarks were published in the Globe-Democrat of St. Louis, and Mr. Davis wrote the following letter of denial: Beauvoir, Miss., November 6, 1884. Editor St. Louis Republican: Dear Sir: I have to-night public record, General Sherman relates the incident of his having been present at the meeting of the G. A. R. Post, in St. Louis, and reiterates his remarks with slight variation, that he had seen papers which convinced me (him) that the President opy-book containing loose sheets and letters, among which was the particular letter of Davis, to which I referred in my St. Louis speech. It explained to me why Governor Vance, after sending to me a commissioner to treat for his State particularl
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
it charge made. The following account of the presentation of General Sherman's letter to the United States Senate appeared in the public prints, and one of the captions is quoted here: No Scapegoat Wanted. The South Responsible, not President Davis. Continuation of the Debate in the United States Senate on the Resolution to Print Senator Sherman's Historical Papers-Senators Vance and Brown Stand by their Record-General Sherman's Mendacity Thoroughly Exposed-The Resolution Passed.-Washington, January 13th.-In the Senate, at ten o'clock, on motion of Senator Hawley, his resolution to call upon the President for copies of the papers filed in the War Department by General Sherman, as a reply to certain strictures of Mr. Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States, was taken up. Senator Vance said that as the Senate would probably pass this resolution and place on its record an unofficial paper by General William T. Sherman, which makes certain statements abou
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