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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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quiry, addressed to Mr. Memminger, ex-Secretary of the Confederate Treasury, he replied on November 27, 1878. Charleston, S. C., November 27, 1878. Honorable Jefferson Davis, Beauvoir, Miss. My dear Sir: I have no recollection of having heard of the proposition referred to by General Beauregard. I remember my having written to Mr. Trenholm, one of the firm of Jno. Frazer & Co., to come on to Montgomery to present the advantages of establishing a depot for cotton and munitions of war at Bermuda, and some station in the West Indies, and that he came on and appeared before the Cabinet, warmly advocated this plan, and that it met with my cordial approval; but it was not approved by the Cabinet. I remember nothing of any proposal to purchase the steamers of the India Company. Mr. William Trenholm remembers his appearance before the Cabinet in behalf of the scheme above mentioned. His address was confined to that scheme, but he says he made the proposition to the Secretary of War
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 82
d on Mr. Davis in his old age and weak health by arraignments made against him by his own people, was relieved very much when he received an expression of regard from either North or South. He was gratified to learn, by a letter from a friend in Maine, his name had not, as he had been informed, been expunged from the honorary membership of Bowdoin College, in Maine. He appreciated gratefully the action of the officers of the college, and answered their kind letter only a few months before hirn, by a letter from a friend in Maine, his name had not, as he had been informed, been expunged from the honorary membership of Bowdoin College, in Maine. He appreciated gratefully the action of the officers of the college, and answered their kind letter only a few months before his death. He was also much pleased at being made a member of the Kappa Sigma Society, which was done in a particularly handsome manner. It was the society of which our son was a much-lamented and beloved brother.
East India (search for this): chapter 82
Chapter 82: the East India fleet. Of course, in the long years after the war, there were many recitations of Mr. Davis's shortcomings, given by one or other of those who thought a mistake had been made when he was asked to preside over the Confederate States. One of these is his alleged failure to purchase the E. I. fleet, which was revamped in 1889 and given to the journals of the day. Judge Roman, in his book entitled Military operations of General Beauregard, states that: While journeying from Charleston to Montgomery, General Beauregard met Mr. W. L. Trenholm, whose father, George A. Trenholm, was a partner in the great firm of John Frazer & Co., of Charleston and Liverpool. This gentleman, as he informed General Beauregard, was the bearer of important propositions from the English branch of their house to the Confederate Government, for the purchase of ten large and powerful steamers, just built in England for the East Indian Company, which, no longer needing the
Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 82
een made when he was asked to preside over the Confederate States. One of these is his alleged failure to purchase the E. I. fleet, which was revamped in 1889 and given to the journals of the day. Judge Roman, in his book entitled Military operations of General Beauregard, states that: While journeying from Charleston to Montgomery, General Beauregard met Mr. W. L. Trenholm, whose father, George A. Trenholm, was a partner in the great firm of John Frazer & Co., of Charleston and Liverpool. This gentleman, as he informed General Beauregard, was the bearer of important propositions from the English branch of their house to the Confederate Government, for the purchase of ten large and powerful steamers, just built in England for the East Indian Company, which, no longer needing them, was desirous of finding a purchaser; the ships were to be properly manned and fitted out, and sent to the Confederate States, thence to export enough cotton to pay for them, and as much more as
Hydaspes (Pakistan) (search for this): chapter 82
he Cabinet; and as to myself, I have no recollection of having been consulted by either Mr. Mallory or the Secretary of War. Very truly yours, C. G. Memminger. In a letter to Captain Bullock, C. S. N., written by Mr. Charles K. Prioleau, senior partner in the Liverpool firm of Frazer, Trenholm & Co., and dated Burges June 21, 1884, he says: As regards the ten steamers, I thought you knew about them. They are a part of the East India Company's fleet, the Golden Fleece, 7ason, Hydaspes, etc.; they were offered to me at the beginning of the war, before you came over, and before the Queen's proclamation. My idea was that, if they could have been armed and got out, they would have swept away every vestige of a Federal blockader then upon the water. Frazer, Trenholm & Co. had not then been appointed agents of the Government, and I did not offer these vessels to the Government, but I mentioned them in a private letter to Mr. G. A. Trenholm, leaving it to his discretion to p
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 82
leged failure to purchase the E. I. fleet, which was revamped in 1889 and given to the journals of the day. Judge Roman, in his book entitled Military operations of General Beauregard, states that: While journeying from Charleston to Montgomery, General Beauregard met Mr. W. L. Trenholm, whose father, George A. Trenholm, was a partner in the great firm of John Frazer & Co., of Charleston and Liverpool. This gentleman, as he informed General Beauregard, was the bearer of important proble Jefferson Davis, Beauvoir, Miss. My dear Sir: I have no recollection of having heard of the proposition referred to by General Beauregard. I remember my having written to Mr. Trenholm, one of the firm of Jno. Frazer & Co., to come on to Montgomery to present the advantages of establishing a depot for cotton and munitions of war at Bermuda, and some station in the West Indies, and that he came on and appeared before the Cabinet, warmly advocated this plan, and that it met with my cordial
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 82
ary operations of General Beauregard, states that: While journeying from Charleston to Montgomery, General Beauregard met Mr. W. L. Trenholm, whose father, George A. Trenholm, was a partner in the great firm of John Frazer & Co., of Charleston and Liverpool. This gentleman, as he informed General Beauregard, was the bearer of important propositions from the English branch of their house to the Confederate Government, for the purchase of ten large and powerful steamers, just built in England for the East Indian Company, which, no longer needing them, was desirous of finding a purchaser; the ships were to be properly manned and fitted out, and sent to the Confederate States, thence to export enough cotton to pay for them, and as much more as should be required to provide for the armament and equipment of our forces. Such a plan, it was thought by the Frazer house, could easily be carried out. The United States Government would require time to collect and rendezvous its fleet,
West Indies (search for this): chapter 82
tter to General Beauregard of September 18th. These letters have been read by Mr. Memminger, and he tells me that only one matter was brought before the Cabinet, viz., the proposition to subsidize steamers, to keep open communication with the West Indies. Since the interview with Mr. Memminger, I have taxed my memory to recall what passed, and it seems to me that, whether it was before the Cabinet or not, the other proposal, viz., to purchase certain steamers, was spoken of at the cabinet ral Beauregard. I remember my having written to Mr. Trenholm, one of the firm of Jno. Frazer & Co., to come on to Montgomery to present the advantages of establishing a depot for cotton and munitions of war at Bermuda, and some station in the West Indies, and that he came on and appeared before the Cabinet, warmly advocated this plan, and that it met with my cordial approval; but it was not approved by the Cabinet. I remember nothing of any proposal to purchase the steamers of the India Co
Biloxi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 82
he second instant. I do not remember the interview with me mentioned by General Beauregard, nor that any proposition was submitted to the Confederate Government for the sale to it of any steamers of the character stated here. If any such proposition was made, it has passed from my recollection. To a like inquiry, addressed to Mr. Memminger, ex-Secretary of the Confederate Treasury, he replied on November 27, 1878. Charleston, S. C., November 27, 1878. Honorable Jefferson Davis, Beauvoir, Miss. My dear Sir: I have no recollection of having heard of the proposition referred to by General Beauregard. I remember my having written to Mr. Trenholm, one of the firm of Jno. Frazer & Co., to come on to Montgomery to present the advantages of establishing a depot for cotton and munitions of war at Bermuda, and some station in the West Indies, and that he came on and appeared before the Cabinet, warmly advocated this plan, and that it met with my cordial approval; but it was not app
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 82
apter 82: the East India fleet. Of course, in the long years after the war, there were many recitations of Mr. Davis's shortcomings, given by one or other of those who thought a mistake had been made when he was asked to preside over the Confederate States. One of these is his alleged failure to purchase the E. I. fleet, which was revamped in 1889 and given to the journals of the day. Judge Roman, in his book entitled Military operations of General Beauregard, states that: While joor the purchase of ten large and powerful steamers, just built in England for the East Indian Company, which, no longer needing them, was desirous of finding a purchaser; the ships were to be properly manned and fitted out, and sent to the Confederate States, thence to export enough cotton to pay for them, and as much more as should be required to provide for the armament and equipment of our forces. Such a plan, it was thought by the Frazer house, could easily be carried out. The United State
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