hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 1,039 11 Browse Search
United States (United States) 542 0 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 325 1 Browse Search
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 190 22 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 186 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 172 0 Browse Search
James Grant 161 1 Browse Search
W. Porcher Miles 137 1 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Stateprisoner Davis 126 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

Found 93 total hits in 33 results.

1 2 3 4
Biloxi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
vis's physician and friend, Dr. Chaille, and our nephew and niece by marriage, Mr. Edgar H. Farrar and Mrs. Stamps. It rvas evident we could not carry him to Beauvoir where he longed to be, and we accepted Judge and Mrs. Fenner's kind invitation to go to them. An ambulance was sent from the Charity Hospital, containing a soft respectful sympathy for his people's sorrow. Our old slaves sent the following loving letter: Brierfield, Miss., January 12, 1890. to Mrs. Jefferson Davis, Beauvoir, Miss. We, the old servants and tenants of our beloved master, Honorable Jefferson Davis, have cause to mingle our tears over his death, who was always so kind ance I am powerless to do so, I beg that you accept my tenderest sympathy and condolence. Your very obedient servant, Thornton. To Mrs. Jefferson Davis, Beauvoir, Miss. Could there have been a surer testimony to Mr. Davis's generous, just, and Christian spirit than that these negroes have given; certainly none afforded me
Christine (North Dakota, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
ghtful of our peace and happiness. We extend to you our humble sympathy. Respectfully, your old tenants and servants, Ned Gator, Grant McKinney, Mary Archer, William Nervis, Teddy Everson, Laura Nick, Tom McKinney, Mary Pendleton, Elija Martin, Isabel Kitchens, Henry Garland, William Green, Gus Williams, and others. Thornton Montgomery, now a man of means, the successful son of Joseph E. Davis's old servant, Ben Montgomery, sent the following affectionate note of sympathy: Christine, North Dakota, December 7, 1889 Miss Varina: I have watched with deep interest and solicitude the illness of Mr. Davis at Brierfield, his trip down on the steamer Leathers, and your meeting and returning with him to the residence of Mr. Payne, in New Orleans; and I had hoped that with good nursing and superior medical skill, together with his great will-power to sustain him, he would recover. But, alas! for human endeavor, an over — ruling providence has willed it otherwise. I appreciate yo
Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
without her strict integrity and grace; but I am giving her trouble. When can we relieve her and go to our dear home? Neither of his two dutiful and devoted daughters, who, he often said, had never disobeyed or given him pain, were with their father, whose life they rendered happy by their love. Our eldest daughter, Mrs. Margaret Hayes, was with her family in Colorado, and the other had been ordered by our physician and urged by her father to take a sea voyage for her health, and was in Paris; I entreated Mr. Davis to let me telegraph for them, but he answered: Let our darlings be happy while they can; I may get well. Margaret came, against our advice, rendered uneasy by the press reports; but the poor child, owing to an accident on the train, reached us too late to see her father alive; at the risk of his life her husband, a much-beloved son to us, came from his sick-bed, with like result; and our daughter Varina, buoyed up by encouraging reports of her father's improvement was
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
self-denying, devoted life. His old comrades in arms came by thousands to mingle their tears with ours. The Governors of nine States came to bear him to his rest. The clergy of all denominations came to pray that his rest might be peaceful, and to testify their respect for and faith in him. Fifty thousand people lined the streets as the catafalque passed. Few, if any, dry eyes looked their last upon him who had given them his life's service. The noble army of the West and that of Northern Virginia escorted him for the last time, and the Washington Artillery, now gray-haired men, were the guard of honor to his bier. I have requested from the Committee who arranged the ceremonies permission to publish their likenesses, and have given them here. The eloquent Bishops of Louisiana and Mississippi, and the clergy of all denominations, delivered short eulogies upon him to weeping thousands, and the strains of Rock of ages once more bore up a great spirit in its flight to Him who ga
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
im. Fifty thousand people lined the streets as the catafalque passed. Few, if any, dry eyes looked their last upon him who had given them his life's service. The noble army of the West and that of Northern Virginia escorted him for the last time, and the Washington Artillery, now gray-haired men, were the guard of honor to his bier. I have requested from the Committee who arranged the ceremonies permission to publish their likenesses, and have given them here. The eloquent Bishops of Louisiana and Mississippi, and the clergy of all denominations, delivered short eulogies upon him to weeping thousands, and the strains of Rock of ages once more bore up a great spirit in its flight to Him who gave, sustained, and took it again to Himself. A few of the Grand Army of the North followed him, with respectful sympathy for his people's sorrow. Our old slaves sent the following loving letter: Brierfield, Miss., January 12, 1890. to Mrs. Jefferson Davis, Beauvoir, Miss. We, the ol
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
nks for everything. Once, when Mrs. Fenner gave him some nourishment and left the room, he remarked: She would be charming even without her strict integrity and grace; but I am giving her trouble. When can we relieve her and go to our dear home? Neither of his two dutiful and devoted daughters, who, he often said, had never disobeyed or given him pain, were with their father, whose life they rendered happy by their love. Our eldest daughter, Mrs. Margaret Hayes, was with her family in Colorado, and the other had been ordered by our physician and urged by her father to take a sea voyage for her health, and was in Paris; I entreated Mr. Davis to let me telegraph for them, but he answered: Let our darlings be happy while they can; I may get well. Margaret came, against our advice, rendered uneasy by the press reports; but the poor child, owing to an accident on the train, reached us too late to see her father alive; at the risk of his life her husband, a much-beloved son to us, cam
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
uch times, I was told, he seemed an incarnation of the most poetic conceptions of a valiant knight-it surely was in his own home, with his family and friends around him, that he was seen at his best; and that best was the highest point of grace and refinement that the Southern character has reached. Lest any foreigner should read this article, let me say for his benefit that there are two Jefferson Davises in American history-one is a conspirator, a rebel, a traitor, and the Fiend of Andersonville --he is a myth evolved from the hell-smoke of cruel war-as purely imaginary a personage as Mephistopheles or the Hebrew Devil; the other was a statesman with clean hands and pure heart, who served his people faithfully from budding manhood to hoary age, without thought of self, with unbending integrity, and to the best of his great ability-he was a man of whom all his countrymen who knew him personally, without distinction of creed political, are proud, and proud that he was their countr
Brierfield (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
to himself all our sons and all my brothers; so that Mr. Davis, though too feeble for the effort, went at intervals to Brierfield, which was inaccessible, and always reached at night by the steamboats, our only means of visiting the island. He hed November IIth, saying my husband would not have a doctor, and was in bed, and I proceeded at once to take a boat for Brierfield. We met upon the river. Captain Leathers, whom we had known, as a boy, felt an intense interest in him, and had his forth followed him, with respectful sympathy for his people's sorrow. Our old slaves sent the following loving letter: Brierfield, Miss., January 12, 1890. to Mrs. Jefferson Davis, Beauvoir, Miss. We, the old servants and tenants of our beloved mh Dakota, December 7, 1889 Miss Varina: I have watched with deep interest and solicitude the illness of Mr. Davis at Brierfield, his trip down on the steamer Leathers, and your meeting and returning with him to the residence of Mr. Payne, in New O
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
ached at night by the steamboats, our only means of visiting the island. He had been for a long time very weak and unable to bear exercise, but felt it his duty to attend to his affairs. Some members of his family were visiting us, and he preferred, as his stay would be short, that I should remain with them. He arrived at the landing at night, but had been attacked on the boat with something which now appears to have been grippe, and was too ill to get off the boat, but went on to Vicksburg and returned the next day. He arrived again at night, and drove several miles home through the malarial atmosphere. I received a telegram from a kind young man in Mr. Davis's employment, dated November IIth, saying my husband would not have a doctor, and was in bed, and I proceeded at once to take a boat for Brierfield. We met upon the river. Captain Leathers, whom we had known, as a boy, felt an intense interest in him, and had his father's boat hailed, and found out Mr. Davis was o
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
and people lined the streets as the catafalque passed. Few, if any, dry eyes looked their last upon him who had given them his life's service. The noble army of the West and that of Northern Virginia escorted him for the last time, and the Washington Artillery, now gray-haired men, were the guard of honor to his bier. I have requested from the Committee who arranged the ceremonies permission to publish their likenesses, and have given them here. The eloquent Bishops of Louisiana and Mississippi, and the clergy of all denominations, delivered short eulogies upon him to weeping thousands, and the strains of Rock of ages once more bore up a great spirit in its flight to Him who gave, sustained, and took it again to Himself. A few of the Grand Army of the North followed him, with respectful sympathy for his people's sorrow. Our old slaves sent the following loving letter: Brierfield, Miss., January 12, 1890. to Mrs. Jefferson Davis, Beauvoir, Miss. We, the old servants and
1 2 3 4