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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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Isham G. Harris (search for this): chapter 1
praise. The enemy's loss was heavy. Besides leaving a number of his dead and wounded on the field, he carried off a large number on horses and in ambulances. We captured 29 prisoners — a captain, 2 lieutenants, and 26 privates. My own loss was 11 killed, 88 wounded, 34 taken prisoners, making aggregate of 133. In horses, 71 killed, 87 wounded, 12 captured, making aggregate loss of horses, 170. Among the killed, I deeply regret to report Major Puller, of the Fifth, and Lieutenant Harris, of the Fourth, both gallant and highly efficient officers — a heavy loss to their regiments and country. In conclusion, I desire especially to state that Major-General J. E. B. Stuart joined me before the fight commenced; was on the field the whole day, assisted immensely by his sagacious counsels, large experience, and by his usual daring and conspicuous example, in turning the fortunes of the day in our favor. We share with him the anguish and deep grief felt at the loss of the
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1
Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. [The following reports were published in 1863, but are so rare as to be accessible to but few. We are confident, therefore, that many of our readers wil Lee's command in action being less than 800. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Headquarters Lee's cavalry brigade, March 23d, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. & I. Gen' officers — a heavy loss to their regiments and country. In conclusion, I desire especially to state that Major-General J. E. B. Stuart joined me before the fight commenced; was on the field the whole day, assisted immensely by his sagacious cou the loss of the noble Pelham of his staff — an officer of the brightest promise for the future. Major Terrill of General Stuart's staff, besides being active on the field, assisted the gallant Brethed in the management of the artillery. Captain
detachments from the various regiments engaged mention in their reports as deserving especial attention: In the Fifth, Private Wm. J. Haynes,,Company F. (badly wounded); Private A. R. Harwood, Company E., Private Henry Wooding, Company C., (especially commended, seized the colors when the horse of the color-bearer was shot, and carried them bravely through the fight); Sergeants Morecocke and Ratliffe, and Private George James, Company H. In the Fourth, Captains Newton and Old, Lieutenant Hobson and Adjutant Fontaine (seriously wounded). Sergeant Kimbrough, of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also me
Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. [The following reports were published in 1863, but are so rare as to be accessible to but few. We are confident, therefore, that many of our readers will be glad to have us print them from the original Mss. in our possession.] Headquarters cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, March 25, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. G.: General: I have the honor to enclose herewith the very graphic report of Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee of the battle of Kelleysville, (March 17th), between his brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry. There is little to be said in addition. The dispositions made for meeting this anticipated raid were sufficient to have prevented or very much retarded the crossing of the Rappahannock at Kelleysville. The report shows wherein these dispositions failed of their object. The brigade, however, under its noble chief, so redeemed the day by an exhibition
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 1
1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. [The following reports were published ie herewith the very graphic report of Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee of the battle of Kelleysville, (March was done; but having approved of Brig.- Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's plans, I determined not to interfere we wound; and on the very efficient staff of General Lee, enumerated in his report, and the many othf the most brilliant achievements of the war, Gen. Lee's command in action being less than 800. B. Stuart, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Headquarters Lee's cavalry brigade, March 23d, 1863. General R. uson and Bowling, Dr. J. B. Fontaine, and Lieutenants Lee, Ryals, and Minnegerode rendered great seed by his. The conduct of Couriers Owings, Lee, Nightengale, and Henry Shackelford, deserves tery respectfully, Your obedient servant, Fitz. Lee, Brig.-Gen'l Comd'q. Recapitulation Of the loss of Brig.-Gen. Fitz. Lee's cavalry brigade, in the engagement near Kelleysville, March 17th[1 more...]
ions made for meeting this anticipated raid were sufficient to have prevented or very much retarded the crossing of the Rappahannock at Kelleysville. The report shows wherein these dispositions failed of their object. The brigade, however, under its noble chief, so redeemed the day by an exhibition of the most extraordinary heroism that we are half disposed to lose sight of the picket failure in the outset. Being charged by the Commanding-General specially with preparations to meet Stoneman, I was present on this occasion because of the responsibility which would necessarily attach to me for what was done; but having approved of Brig.- Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's plans, I determined not to interfere with his command of the brigade as long as it was commanded so entirely to my satisfaction, and I took special pride in witnessing its gallant conduct under its accomplished leader. The defeat was decided, and the enemy, broken and demoralized, retired, under cover of darkness, to his
R. H. Chilton (search for this): chapter 1
be accessible to but few. We are confident, therefore, that many of our readers will be glad to have us print them from the original Mss. in our possession.] Headquarters cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, March 25, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. G.: General: I have the honor to enclose herewith the very graphic report of Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee of the battle of Kelleysville, (March 17th), between his brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry. There is little to be chievements of the war, Gen. Lee's command in action being less than 800. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Headquarters Lee's cavalry brigade, March 23d, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. & I. Gen'l A. N. Va. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of an encounter on the 17th instant between my brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry, certainly not less than 3,000 mounted men with a battery of
of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-Major E. N. Price, Comp
he determined bravery of his men for this signal victory, which, when the odds are considered, was one of the most brilliant achievements of the war, Gen. Lee's command in action being less than 800. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Headquarters Lee's cavalry brigade, March 23d, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. & I. Gen'l A. N. Va. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of an encounter on the 17th instant between my brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry, certainly not less than 3,000 mounted men with a battery of artillery. My first intimation of their approach was a telegram received at 11 A. M. on 16th from headquarters, A. N. V. At 6 P. M., scouts reported them at Morissville, a little place 6 miles from Kelley's Ford. At 1 A. M., another report informed me that enemy had encamped at that place, coming from three different directions. I that night reinforced my picket of
the Second, whose boldness led him so far that he was captured, his horse being shot. Colonel T. L. Munford of the Second, I regret to say, was President of a Court-Martial in Culpeper Courthouse, and did not know of the action in time to join his command until the fight was nearly over. I also commend for their behavior, Captain Tebbs, of the Second, and Captain Litchfield and Lieutenant Dorsey, of the First; also Major W. A. Morgan, of the First. My personal staff, Major Mason, Captains Ferguson and Bowling, Dr. J. B. Fontaine, and Lieutenants Lee, Ryals, and Minnegerode rendered great service by their accurate and quick transmission of orders, and by their conduct under fire. Surgeon Fontaine's horse was killed under him, and my own was also shot; but through the generosity of Private Jno. H. Owings, Company K, First Virginia cavalry, attached to my headquarters, was quickly replaced by his. The conduct of Couriers Owings, Lee, Nightengale, and Henry Shackelford, deserv
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