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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Poindexter (search for this): chapter 1
ed). Sergeant Kimbrough, of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-
Shackelford, deserves the highest praise. The enemy's loss was heavy. Besides leaving a number of his dead and wounded on the field, he carried off a large number on horses and in ambulances. We captured 29 prisoners — a captain, 2 lieutenants, and 26 privates. My own loss was 11 killed, 88 wounded, 34 taken prisoners, making aggregate of 133. In horses, 71 killed, 87 wounded, 12 captured, making aggregate loss of horses, 170. Among the killed, I deeply regret to report Major Puller, of the Fifth, and Lieutenant Harris, of the Fourth, both gallant and highly efficient officers — a heavy loss to their regiments and country. In conclusion, I desire especially to state that Major-General J. E. B. Stuart joined me before the fight commenced; was on the field the whole day, assisted immensely by his sagacious counsels, large experience, and by his usual daring and conspicuous example, in turning the fortunes of the day in our favor. We share with him the anguish and
detachments from the various regiments engaged mention in their reports as deserving especial attention: In the Fifth, Private Wm. J. Haynes,,Company F. (badly wounded); Private A. R. Harwood, Company E., Private Henry Wooding, Company C., (especially commended, seized the colors when the horse of the color-bearer was shot, and carried them bravely through the fight); Sergeants Morecocke and Ratliffe, and Private George James, Company H. In the Fourth, Captains Newton and Old, Lieutenant Hobson and Adjutant Fontaine (seriously wounded). Sergeant Kimbrough, of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also me
Virginia, to move from their camps by day-break to a point on the railroad, where road turns to Kelley's, 2 mile from railroad bridge, and 31 from Kelley's, and the rest of the command was ordered toKelley's, and the rest of the command was ordered to be in readiness to move at the shortest notice. At that time a force was reported to be at Bealeton, supposed to be their advance guard; and it was uncertain whether they would attempt to cross at KKelley's, railroad bridge, or move on towards Warrenton. The report that enemy's attack was made at Kelley's never reached me; and the first intimation I received from that point was at 7:30 A. M.,Kelley's never reached me; and the first intimation I received from that point was at 7:30 A. M., to the effect that they had succeeded in crossing, capturing 25 of my sharpshooters who were unable to reach their horses. I moved my command at once down the railroad, taking up a position to awaitime elapsing and they not advancing, I determined to move upon them, and marched immediately for Kelley's. First met the enemy half a mile this side of ford, and at once charged them. Their position
Jonathan H. Owings (search for this): chapter 1
ee, Ryals, and Minnegerode rendered great service by their accurate and quick transmission of orders, and by their conduct under fire. Surgeon Fontaine's horse was killed under him, and my own was also shot; but through the generosity of Private Jno. H. Owings, Company K, First Virginia cavalry, attached to my headquarters, was quickly replaced by his. The conduct of Couriers Owings, Lee, Nightengale, and Henry Shackelford, deserves the highest praise. The enemy's loss was heavy. BesiOwings, Lee, Nightengale, and Henry Shackelford, deserves the highest praise. The enemy's loss was heavy. Besides leaving a number of his dead and wounded on the field, he carried off a large number on horses and in ambulances. We captured 29 prisoners — a captain, 2 lieutenants, and 26 privates. My own loss was 11 killed, 88 wounded, 34 taken prisoners, making aggregate of 133. In horses, 71 killed, 87 wounded, 12 captured, making aggregate loss of horses, 170. Among the killed, I deeply regret to report Major Puller, of the Fifth, and Lieutenant Harris, of the Fourth, both gallant and hig
T. L. Munford (search for this): chapter 1
rging at the head of his regiment. Colonel James Drake, of the First, always ready at the right time and place. Colonel T. H. Owen, of Third, begging to be allowed to charge, again and again. Lieutenant-Colonel W. H. Payne, of the Fourth, unmindful of his former dreadful wound, using his sabre with effect in hand-to-hand conflict, and the imperturbable, self — possessed Major Breckenridge, of the Second, whose boldness led him so far that he was captured, his horse being shot. Colonel T. L. Munford of the Second, I regret to say, was President of a Court-Martial in Culpeper Courthouse, and did not know of the action in time to join his command until the fight was nearly over. I also commend for their behavior, Captain Tebbs, of the Second, and Captain Litchfield and Lieutenant Dorsey, of the First; also Major W. A. Morgan, of the First. My personal staff, Major Mason, Captains Ferguson and Bowling, Dr. J. B. Fontaine, and Lieutenants Lee, Ryals, and Minnegerode rendered gr
W. H. Payne (search for this): chapter 1
g to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Compahis habitual coolness and daring, charging at the head of his regiment. Colonel James Drake, of the First, always ready at the right time and place. Colonel T. H. Owen, of Third, begging to be allowed to charge, again and again. Lieutenant-Colonel W. H. Payne, of the Fourth, unmindful of his former dreadful wound, using his sabre with effect in hand-to-hand conflict, and the imperturbable, self — possessed Major Breckenridge, of the Second, whose boldness led him so far that he was capture
Morecocke (search for this): chapter 1
orderly rout, and the whole brigade be supplied with horses, saddles, and bridles. Commanding officers of the detachments from the various regiments engaged mention in their reports as deserving especial attention: In the Fifth, Private Wm. J. Haynes,,Company F. (badly wounded); Private A. R. Harwood, Company E., Private Henry Wooding, Company C., (especially commended, seized the colors when the horse of the color-bearer was shot, and carried them bravely through the fight); Sergeants Morecocke and Ratliffe, and Private George James, Company H. In the Fourth, Captains Newton and Old, Lieutenant Hobson and Adjutant Fontaine (seriously wounded). Sergeant Kimbrough, of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried ov
Joseph Gilman (search for this): chapter 1
utant Fontaine (seriously wounded). Sergeant Kimbrough, of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended fo
unded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-Major E. N. Price, Company K; Private Keech, Company I; and Bugler D
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