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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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George James (search for this): chapter 1
supplied with horses, saddles, and bridles. Commanding officers of the detachments from the various regiments engaged mention in their reports as deserving especial attention: In the Fifth, Private Wm. J. Haynes,,Company F. (badly wounded); Private A. R. Harwood, Company E., Private Henry Wooding, Company C., (especially commended, seized the colors when the horse of the color-bearer was shot, and carried them bravely through the fight); Sergeants Morecocke and Ratliffe, and Private George James, Company H. In the Fourth, Captains Newton and Old, Lieutenant Hobson and Adjutant Fontaine (seriously wounded). Sergeant Kimbrough, of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walke
E. N. Price (search for this): chapter 1
xter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-Major E. N. Price, Company K; Private Keech, Company I; and Bugler Drilling. Sergeant Betts, of Company C; Privates Young, Company B; Fowler, Company G, and Wilkins, of Company C, died as became brave men, in the front of the charge at the head of the column. In the Second, the commanding officer reports, where so many behaved themselves with so much gallantry he does not like to discriminate. In the First, Captain Jordan, Company C, and Lieutenant Cecil, Company K, (specially commended f
H. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 1
nel Payne, commanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-Major E. N. Price, Company K; Private Keech, Company I; and Bugler Drilling. Sergeant Betts, of Company C; Privates Young, Company B; Fowler, Company G, and Wilkins, of Company C, died as became brave men, in the front of the charge at the head of the column. In the Second, the commanding officer reports, where so many behaved themselves with so much gallantry he does not like to discriminate. In the First, Capt
N. Priddy (search for this): chapter 1
, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-Major E. N. Price, Company K; Privat
of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-Major E. N. Price, Comp
Isham G. Harris (search for this): chapter 1
praise. The enemy's loss was heavy. Besides leaving a number of his dead and wounded on the field, he carried off a large number on horses and in ambulances. We captured 29 prisoners — a captain, 2 lieutenants, and 26 privates. My own loss was 11 killed, 88 wounded, 34 taken prisoners, making aggregate of 133. In horses, 71 killed, 87 wounded, 12 captured, making aggregate loss of horses, 170. Among the killed, I deeply regret to report Major Puller, of the Fifth, and Lieutenant Harris, of the Fourth, both gallant and highly efficient officers — a heavy loss to their regiments and country. In conclusion, I desire especially to state that Major-General J. E. B. Stuart joined me before the fight commenced; was on the field the whole day, assisted immensely by his sagacious counsels, large experience, and by his usual daring and conspicuous example, in turning the fortunes of the day in our favor. We share with him the anguish and deep grief felt at the loss of the
pecial pride in witnessing its gallant conduct under its accomplished leader. The defeat was decided, and the enemy, broken and demoralized, retired, under cover of darkness, to his place of refuge — the main army having abandoned in defeat an expedition undertaken with boasting and vain-glorious demonstration. I have the honor to enclose a copy of congratulatory orders from division and brigade headquarters, and an order announcing to the division the death of the lamented and noble Pelham. I was especially indebted to him for his usual gallant services, and to Capt. Harry Gilmer, Twelfth Virginia cavalry, who accompanied me as volunteer staff. Major Lewis F. Terrell, the court martial to which he belonged having taken recess, buckled on his sword with commendable zeal, and came to the field, where he acquitted himself with credit both as an artillery and staff officer. I cordially concur with Brigadier-General commanding in the high praise he bestows on Col. T. L. Ro
Kimbrough (search for this): chapter 1
ir reports as deserving especial attention: In the Fifth, Private Wm. J. Haynes,,Company F. (badly wounded); Private A. R. Harwood, Company E., Private Henry Wooding, Company C., (especially commended, seized the colors when the horse of the color-bearer was shot, and carried them bravely through the fight); Sergeants Morecocke and Ratliffe, and Private George James, Company H. In the Fourth, Captains Newton and Old, Lieutenant Hobson and Adjutant Fontaine (seriously wounded). Sergeant Kimbrough, of Company G, deserves particular notice; wounded early in the day, he refused to leave the field. In the last charge he was the first to spring to the ground to open the fence. Then, dashing on at the head of the column, he was twice sabred over the head, his arm shattered by a bullet, captured and carried over the river, when he escaped and walked back 12 miles to his camp. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, commanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, S
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1
Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. [The following reports were published in 1863, but are so rare as to be accessible to but few. We are confident, therefore, that many of our readers wil Lee's command in action being less than 800. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Headquarters Lee's cavalry brigade, March 23d, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. & I. Gen' officers — a heavy loss to their regiments and country. In conclusion, I desire especially to state that Major-General J. E. B. Stuart joined me before the fight commenced; was on the field the whole day, assisted immensely by his sagacious cou the loss of the noble Pelham of his staff — an officer of the brightest promise for the future. Major Terrill of General Stuart's staff, besides being active on the field, assisted the gallant Brethed in the management of the artillery. Captain
R. H. Chilton (search for this): chapter 1
be accessible to but few. We are confident, therefore, that many of our readers will be glad to have us print them from the original Mss. in our possession.] Headquarters cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, March 25, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. G.: General: I have the honor to enclose herewith the very graphic report of Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee of the battle of Kelleysville, (March 17th), between his brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry. There is little to be chievements of the war, Gen. Lee's command in action being less than 800. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Headquarters Lee's cavalry brigade, March 23d, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. & I. Gen'l A. N. Va. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of an encounter on the 17th instant between my brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry, certainly not less than 3,000 mounted men with a battery of
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