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r I was directed to return to the wall where I had first formed line of battle. Hood's division, then commanded by General Law, was engaged with the enemy's cavalry in his front, his line being formed across our right flank. Lieutenant-General Longstreet directed me to move to the right so as to connect with Hood's left, retaining my then front. This I did, and remained in that position until the night of the 4th, when, about midnight, I moved with the army via Franklin to Montery. On the 6th, marched through Hagerstown via Waterloo, and camped near Funkstown. On the 10th I was directed to proceed with my own and Senmmes' brigades and a section of Frazier's battery to the bridge across the Antietam, near Macauley's, and defend that position, the enemy having appeared in force on the other side. Some unimportant skirmishing occurred here, and next morning I rejoined the division near the St. James College. We remained in line of battle, with the enemy in front, until the night
e unimportant skirmishing occurred here, and next morning I rejoined the division near the St. James College. We remained in line of battle, with the enemy in front, until the night of the 13th, when we marched to Falling Waters, and recrossed the Potomac on the 14th. March was continued next day to Bunker Hill, where we rested until the 18th, when we resumed the march for Culpeper Courthouse via Millwood, Front Royal, Chester Gap and Gaines' Cross-roads, arriving at 10 o'clock A. M. on the 24th. I cannot close this report without expressing my thanks to Major W. D. Peck, A. Q. M., and Major Joseph Kennedy, A. C. S. of the brigade staff, and all the regimental officers of their departments for their assiduous and efficient exertions during this important campaign. The reports of regimental commanders accompany this. The casualties have already been reported. I am, Major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. B. Kershaw, Brigadier-General Commanding. Major J.
oon of the next day, when I was ordered to return to the stone wall. An hour later I was directed to return to the wall where I had first formed line of battle. Hood's division, then commanded by General Law, was engaged with the enemy's cavalry in his front, his line being formed across our right flank. Lieutenant-General Longstreet directed me to move to the right so as to connect with Hood's left, retaining my then front. This I did, and remained in that position until the night of the 4th, when, about midnight, I moved with the army via Franklin to Montery. On the 6th, marched through Hagerstown via Waterloo, and camped near Funkstown. On the 10th I was directed to proceed with my own and Senmmes' brigades and a section of Frazier's battery to the bridge across the Antietam, near Macauley's, and defend that position, the enemy having appeared in force on the other side. Some unimportant skirmishing occurred here, and next morning I rejoined the division near the St. James
Report of General Kershaw. Headquarters Kershaw's brigade, near Chattanooga, October 1st, 1863. Major: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from the commencement of the march from Culpeper Courthouse until the return of the army to that place. Tuesday, June 16th, the brigade marched to Sperryville; 17th, to Mud run, in Fauquier county. These two days were excessively hot, and on the 17th many cases of sun-stroke occurred. At Gaines' Cross-roads the wagons were sent by the way of Front Royal; Rice's battalion was detached as a guard to the division train; 18th, marched to Piedmont; 19th, to Ashby's Gap, where Rice's battalion rejoined the command; 20th, crossed the Shenandoah river at Berry's Ford; 21st, recrossed and took position in line of battle near Paris to resist a threatened attack of the enemy; 22d, returned to camp on western side of the river; 23d, obtained 503 new arms from Winchester; 24th, marched to Summit Point; 25th, to Martinsburg;
erstown, Middleburg and Greencastle and camped five miles from Chambersburg; 28th, marched through Chambersburg and camped one mile beyond; remained in camp until the 30th, when we marched to Fayetteville; 1st July, Anderson's and Johnson's divisions and General Ewell's wagon train occupied the road until 4 o'clock P. M., when we marched to a point on the Gettysburg road some two miles from that place, going into camp at 12 P. M. The command was ordered to move at 4 A. M. on the morning of the 2d, but did not leave camp until about sunrise. We reached the hill overlooking Gettysburg with only a slight detention from trains in the way, and moved to the right of the Third corps, and were halted until about noon. We were then directed to move under cover of the hills towards the right with a view to flanking the enemy in that direction if cover could be found to conceal the movement. Arriving at the hill beyond the hotel at the Stone Bridge on the Fairfield road, the column was halted
h I was directed to proceed with my own and Senmmes' brigades and a section of Frazier's battery to the bridge across the Antietam, near Macauley's, and defend that position, the enemy having appeared in force on the other side. Some unimportant skirmishing occurred here, and next morning I rejoined the division near the St. James College. We remained in line of battle, with the enemy in front, until the night of the 13th, when we marched to Falling Waters, and recrossed the Potomac on the 14th. March was continued next day to Bunker Hill, where we rested until the 18th, when we resumed the march for Culpeper Courthouse via Millwood, Front Royal, Chester Gap and Gaines' Cross-roads, arriving at 10 o'clock A. M. on the 24th. I cannot close this report without expressing my thanks to Major W. D. Peck, A. Q. M., and Major Joseph Kennedy, A. C. S. of the brigade staff, and all the regimental officers of their departments for their assiduous and efficient exertions during this impor
ed through Hagerstown via Waterloo, and camped near Funkstown. On the 10th I was directed to proceed with my own and Senmmes' brigades and a section of Frazier's battery to the bridge across the Antietam, near Macauley's, and defend that position, the enemy having appeared in force on the other side. Some unimportant skirmishing occurred here, and next morning I rejoined the division near the St. James College. We remained in line of battle, with the enemy in front, until the night of the 13th, when we marched to Falling Waters, and recrossed the Potomac on the 14th. March was continued next day to Bunker Hill, where we rested until the 18th, when we resumed the march for Culpeper Courthouse via Millwood, Front Royal, Chester Gap and Gaines' Cross-roads, arriving at 10 o'clock A. M. on the 24th. I cannot close this report without expressing my thanks to Major W. D. Peck, A. Q. M., and Major Joseph Kennedy, A. C. S. of the brigade staff, and all the regimental officers of their
Hood's division, then commanded by General Law, was engaged with the enemy's cavalry in his front, his line being formed across our right flank. Lieutenant-General Longstreet directed me to move to the right so as to connect with Hood's left, retaining my then front. This I did, and remained in that position until the night of the 4th, when, about midnight, I moved with the army via Franklin to Montery. On the 6th, marched through Hagerstown via Waterloo, and camped near Funkstown. On the 10th I was directed to proceed with my own and Senmmes' brigades and a section of Frazier's battery to the bridge across the Antietam, near Macauley's, and defend that position, the enemy having appeared in force on the other side. Some unimportant skirmishing occurred here, and next morning I rejoined the division near the St. James College. We remained in line of battle, with the enemy in front, until the night of the 13th, when we marched to Falling Waters, and recrossed the Potomac on the 1
near Paris to resist a threatened attack of the enemy; 22d, returned to camp on western side of the river; 23d, obtained 503 new arms from Winchester; 24th, marched to Summit Point; 25th, to Martinsburg; 26th, crossed Potomac river, camped near Williamsport; 27th, marched by the way of Hagerstown, Middleburg and Greencastle and camped five miles from Chambersburg; 28th, marched through Chambersburg and camped one mile beyond; remained in camp until the 30th, when we marched to Fayetteville; 1st July, Anderson's and Johnson's divisions and General Ewell's wagon train occupied the road until 4 o'clock P. M., when we marched to a point on the Gettysburg road some two miles from that place, going into camp at 12 P. M. The command was ordered to move at 4 A. M. on the morning of the 2d, but did not leave camp until about sunrise. We reached the hill overlooking Gettysburg with only a slight detention from trains in the way, and moved to the right of the Third corps, and were halted until
October 1st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 23
Report of General Kershaw. Headquarters Kershaw's brigade, near Chattanooga, October 1st, 1863. Major: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from the commencement of the march from Culpeper Courthouse until the return of the army to that place. Tuesday, June 16th, the brigade marched to Sperryville; 17th, to Mud run, in Fauquier county. These two days were excessively hot, and on the 17th many cases of sun-stroke occurred. At Gaines' Cross-roads the wagons were sent by the way of Front Royal; Rice's battalion was detached as a guard to the division train; 18th, marched to Piedmont; 19th, to Ashby's Gap, where Rice's battalion rejoined the command; 20th, crossed the Shenandoah river at Berry's Ford; 21st, recrossed and took position in line of battle near Paris to resist a threatened attack of the enemy; 22d, returned to camp on western side of the river; 23d, obtained 503 new arms from Winchester; 24th, marched to Summit Point; 25th, to Martinsburg
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