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upon a force of the enemy deemed too strong to be assailed by the two brigades, the command was halted, and Brigadier-General Jackson reported the facts and awaited further instructions; whereupon the two brigades were directed by order of the corps commander to return to their positions in the line. They reached their places in the trenches at about — o'clock P. M., having captured a few stragglers, some sutler's stores, several wagons and mules with forage, broken-down horses, &c. On the 28th and 29th small parties were sent forward for the purpose of scouting my whole front thoroughly, and of ascertaining, if possible, the precise route taken by the enemy, and for the purpose, generally, of getting all the information possible in regard to his movements. These scouts reported the enemy as having moved the larger portion of his forces in the direction of Sandtown and Blue-pond; but one corps, at least, they reported to have crossed the Chattahoochee river, and to have moved up th
copy of which reached me by mail on yesterday — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the division I commanded from the 30th of July to the 31st of August, inclusive: On the 28th of July, 1864, Hindman's division, of Lee's corps, was hotly engaged with the enemy about three miles from Atlanta, on the Lickskillet road and near the poorhouse. In that engagement the division lost in killed, wounded and missing upwards of five hundred men and officers. On the 29th I was assigned to, and on the 30th assumed, the command of the division, consisting of Sharp's and Brantley's brigades of Mississippians, Deas' brigade of Alabamians, and Manigault's brigade of Alabama and South Carolina troops. Lee's corps was, at that time, holding the extreme left of our lines in front of Atlanta; my division was on the right of Lee's corps-my right resting on the Lickskillet road, my left on Utoy creek. Deas', Brantley's, Sharp's and Manigault's brigades were in positio
s, Deas' brigade of Alabamians, and Manigault's brigade of Alabama and South Carolina troops. Lee's corps was, at that time, holding the extreme left of our lines in front of Atlanta; my division was on the right of Lee's corps-my right resting on the Lickskillet road, my left on Utoy creek. Deas', Brantley's, Sharp's and Manigault's brigades were in position in the order named from right to left, and numbered in all about 2,800 bayonets. The position'had been taken on the night of the 28th of July, after the command had been withdrawn from the battle-field near the poorhouse. The line extended over uneven ground, through woods and open fields, across hills and over narrow valleys, and was capable of being rendered quite strong against an attack by infantry. For this purpose strong details were made, and.all the entrenching tools that could be procured were put in the hands of the troops. The work of entrenching was pushed with vigor, night and day, till a feeling of security, a
Report of General Patton Anderson of operations of his division from 30th of July to 31st of August, 1864, including the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia. [From the original unpublished Ms. in archives of the Southern Historical Society.] Monticello, Florida, February 9th, 1865. In compliance with circular order from Headquarters Lee's Corps, dated January 24th, 1864-a copy of which reached me by mail on yesterday — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the division I commanded from the 30th of July to the 31st of August, inclusive: On the 28th of July, 1864, Hindman's division, of Lee's corps, was hotly engaged with the enemy about three miles from Atlanta, on the Lickskillet road and near the poorhouse. In that engagement the division lost in killed, wounded and missing upwards of five hundred men and officers. On the 29th I was assigned to, and on the 30th assumed, the command of the division, consisting of Sharp's and Brantley's brigades of
he main line was constantly being strengthened. The trenches were enlarged, the breastworks were made wider and stronger in every particular, while every available obstruction within the reach of the troops was resorted to and made use of to render the line as strong as possible. Abattis of the most substantial kind, chevaux-de-frise and palisades of approved styles bristled along our whole front, giving confidence to our troops and speaking defiance to the foe. Four weeks, in the month of August, were spent in perfecting these works of defence and in annoying the enemy from our picket line and with the artillery as much as was consistent with an economical expenditure of ammunition. I refer to the operations of the division during this month with pleasure, as evincing a spirit and determination on the part of the troops, as well as an alacrity and skill in the performance of every duty on the part of their officers, worthy of the highest praise. To the brigade commanders (Deas, B
August 25th (search for this): chapter 27
Sharp and Manigault) I am specially indebted for their prompt obedience to every order and cheerful co-operation in every thing tending to promote the efficiency of the command and the good of the service. Their sympathy, counsel and hearty co-operation lightened my burden of responsibility and contributed to the esprit du corps, discipline and good feeling which, happily, pervade the division, and without which the bravest troops in the world cannot be relied on. On the night of the 25th August our scouts reported a movement on the part of the enemy, the precise character of which was not fully understood, but which was indicated by the rumbling of artillery and wagons, &c. On the next morning it was ascertained that he had withdrawn from the front of a portion of the line occupied by Lieutenant-General Stewart's corps, which was on the right of Lee's corps. During the night of the 26th he withdrew from my front. As this movement was not unlooked for by us, preparations for it
August 31st (search for this): chapter 27
ircular order from Headquarters Lee's Corps, dated January 24th, 1864-a copy of which reached me by mail on yesterday — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the division I commanded from the 30th of July to the 31st of August, inclusive: On the 28th of July, 1864, Hindman's division, of Lee's corps, was hotly engaged with the enemy about three miles from Atlanta, on the Lickskillet road and near the poorhouse. In that engagement the division lost in killed, wo induce a degree of straggling which I do not remember to have seen exceeded in any former march of the kind. In this plight the division, well closed up on Cheatham's rear, reached the vicinity of Jonesboroa at about 11 o'clock A. M. on the 31st August, and was halted on the railroad, north of and about half a mile distant from the village. The enemy, in apparently strong force, was plainly visible on both sides of Flint river (an inconsiderable stream at this point), in a westerly directi
January 24th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 27
Report of General Patton Anderson of operations of his division from 30th of July to 31st of August, 1864, including the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia. [From the original unpublished Ms. in archives of the Southern Historical Society.] Monticello, Florida, February 9th, 1865. In compliance with circular order from Headquarters Lee's Corps, dated January 24th, 1864-a copy of which reached me by mail on yesterday — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the division I commanded from the 30th of July to the 31st of August, inclusive: On the 28th of July, 1864, Hindman's division, of Lee's corps, was hotly engaged with the enemy about three miles from Atlanta, on the Lickskillet road and near the poorhouse. In that engagement the division lost in killed, wounded and missing upwards of five hundred men and officers. On the 29th I was assigned to, and on the 30th assumed, the command of the division, consisting of Sharp's and Brantley's brigades of
July 28th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 27
ugust, 1864, including the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia. [From the original unpublished Ms. in archives of the Southern Historical Society.] Monticello, Florida, February 9th, 1865. In compliance with circular order from Headquarters Lee's Corps, dated January 24th, 1864-a copy of which reached me by mail on yesterday — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the division I commanded from the 30th of July to the 31st of August, inclusive: On the 28th of July, 1864, Hindman's division, of Lee's corps, was hotly engaged with the enemy about three miles from Atlanta, on the Lickskillet road and near the poorhouse. In that engagement the division lost in killed, wounded and missing upwards of five hundred men and officers. On the 29th I was assigned to, and on the 30th assumed, the command of the division, consisting of Sharp's and Brantley's brigades of Mississippians, Deas' brigade of Alabamians, and Manigault's brigade of Alabama and South Caro
August 31st, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 27
Report of General Patton Anderson of operations of his division from 30th of July to 31st of August, 1864, including the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia. [From the original unpublished Ms. in archives of the Southern Historical Society.] Monticello, Florida, February 9th, 1865. In compliance with circular order from Headquarters Lee's Corps, dated January 24th, 1864-a copy of which reached me by mail on yesterday — I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the division I commanded from the 30th of July to the 31st of August, inclusive: On the 28th of July, 1864, Hindman's division, of Lee's corps, was hotly engaged with the enemy about three miles from Atlanta, on the Lickskillet road and near the poorhouse. In that engagement the division lost in killed, wounded and missing upwards of five hundred men and officers. On the 29th I was assigned to, and on the 30th assumed, the command of the division, consisting of Sharp's and Brantley's brigades o
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