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left General Lee quite late on the night of the first. And he further says: When I left General Lee on the night of the first, I believe that he had made up his mind to attack, but was confident that he had not yet determined as to when the attack on General Lee's return from Ewell's line, must have caused the sending of Colonel Marshall to Ewell on the night of the first, after the conference I have spoken of. Longstreet says: On the morning of the 2nd I went to General Lee's headqley on its advance into Pennsylvania, and two of its divisions, as well as two of Hill's, had been heavily engaged on the first. Can it be that General Longstreet apprehended that if the advantage gained on the first day was promptly and vigorou well as the very full statement contained in my Review, show that two of my brigades were placed, on the afternoon of the 1st, before General Lee came to our part of the line, on the York road, to guard against a flank movement apprehended in that
rdered me to attack the enemy at sunrise on the 2nd. General J. A. Early has, in positive terms, enurpose to attack at dawn on the morning of the 2nd, and that he had left us for the purpose of ordorder was given him to attack at sunrise on the 2nd. As before stated, I do not know what orders wer for an attack on the enemy at sunrise on the 2nd, nor can I believe any such order was issued byk as early as practicable on the morning of the 2nd, before Meade's army should all be up? Swinton former reached the field on the morning of the 2nd, and the latter at 2 P. M. To show that a gnemy at a very early hour on the morning of the 2nd, which every consideration so imperatively demat all, but Gordon's brigade was sent for on the 2nd, Stuart's cavalry having arrived, and got back of the delay in the attack from our right on the 2d, the article proceeds: He (Colonel Taylor) Longstreet complains of Ewell's inaction on the 2d. What must be thought of his inaction from dayl[2 more...]
th him on the question of veracity, just as I am disposed to side with Colonel Taylor on the direct issue of veracity raised by General Longstreet with him in regard to the order for the use of Hood's and McLaws' divisions in the attack made on the 3d. General Lee's statement of his orders in regard to this latter attack would imply that the orders originally given in regard to it were to make it with Longstreet's whole corps, and is therefore corroborative of Colonel Taylor's statement. l's from the context and adding Meade's, the false impression is sought to be made that Johnson did not attack at all. General Longstreet complains of Ewell's inaction on the 2d. What must be thought of his inaction from daylight to 2 P. M. on the 3d? The statement by General Alexander, who was only a colonel of artillery at Gettysburg. that the responsibility of ordering Pickett when to begin the charge on the third day was devolved on him, with permission even to abstain from giving the
arly as practicable; and it is my impression that he issued orders to that effect. I inferred that such was the case from the instructions that Gen. Lee gave me on the evening of the first and very early on the morning of the second of July. See also General Long's letter to me in the August number of the Southern Historical Society Papers. The letter of Colonel Venable is as follows: University of Virginia, May 11, 1875. General James Longstreet: Dear Sir: Your letter of the 25th ultimo, with regard to Gen. Lee's battle order on th-, 1st and 2nd of July at Gettysburg, was duly received. I did not know of any order for an attack on the enemy at sunrise on the 2nd, nor can I believe any such order was issued by General Lee. About sunrise on the 2nd of July I was sent by General Lee to General Ewell to ask him what he thought of the advantages of an attack on the enemy from his position. (Colonel Marshall had been sent with a similar order on the night of the 1st.) Genera
a much earlier hour than that at which it was made. Before referring to that testimony, I desire to say that the statement contained in the article in the Times, that the information of the crossing of the Potomac by the Federal army was received from a scout on the night of the 29th of June is erroneous. Gen. Longstreet's own report, as well as General Lee's detailed one, show that the information was received on the night of the 28th. If it had not been received until the night of the 29th, it would have been impossible for the order to return to reach me at York by the way of Carlisle in time for me to begin my march back early enough on the 30th to reach Gettysburg in time for the fight on the 1st of July. The fact was that I received the order on the morning of the 29th at York, with the information that the enemy had crossed the Potomac and was moving north. The statements of Colonel Taylor and Marshall, and of Gen- Long, as given by General Longstreet, that they knew
e testimony of Meade and his officers, contained in the 1st volume, 2nd series, of the Congressional Report on the Conduct of the War, will satisfy any one that the bulk of the Federal army that was up was massed on the right, confronting Ewell's corps, all the forenoon of the 2nd, and that the Round Tops, the key.to the position on the enemy's left were unoccupied until Longstreet's movement began at 4 P. M. The distance which Longstreet's corps had to march from its camp of the night of the 30th, to reach the town of Gettysburg itself, could not have exceeded 15 miles, and it had the whole day of the 1st to make it, though it was somewhat delayed by Johnson's division of Ewell's corps, which got the road first, by moving more promptly it is presumed. The Fifth corps of Meade's army was 23 miles from Gettysburg at the close of the fight on the first day, and the Sixth corps was 36 miles away, yet the former reached the field on the morning of the 2nd, and the latter at 2 P. M. T
the 2nd to be made at the very earliest hour practicable. The testimony General Longstreet has adduced is very far from establishing the fact that General Lee did not direct the attack to be made by him at a much earlier hour than that at which it was made. Before referring to that testimony, I desire to say that the statement contained in the article in the Times, that the information of the crossing of the Potomac by the Federal army was received from a scout on the night of the 29th of June is erroneous. Gen. Longstreet's own report, as well as General Lee's detailed one, show that the information was received on the night of the 28th. If it had not been received until the night of the 29th, it would have been impossible for the order to return to reach me at York by the way of Carlisle in time for me to begin my march back early enough on the 30th to reach Gettysburg in time for the fight on the 1st of July. The fact was that I received the order on the morning of the 29
Longstreet on myself will not be at all astonished. In my official report, dated in the month of August, 1863, after giving an account of the operations of the 1st of July, I say: Having been informed that the greater portion of the rest of our army would move up during the night, and that the enemy's position would be attaeturn to reach me at York by the way of Carlisle in time for me to begin my march back early enough on the 30th to reach Gettysburg in time for the fight on the 1st of July. The fact was that I received the order on the morning of the 29th at York, with the information that the enemy had crossed the Potomac and was moving north. ollows: University of Virginia, May 11, 1875. General James Longstreet: Dear Sir: Your letter of the 25th ultimo, with regard to Gen. Lee's battle order on th-, 1st and 2nd of July at Gettysburg, was duly received. I did not know of any order for an attack on the enemy at sunrise on the 2nd, nor can I believe any such order wa
al Longstreet to attack at sunrise on the morning of the 2d of July at Gettysburg, those familiar with the controversy that was General Lee's intention to attack the enemy on the second of July as early as practicable; and it is my impression that ning of the first and very early on the morning of the second of July. See also General Long's letter to me in the Augus, with regard to Gen. Lee's battle order on th-, 1st and 2nd of July at Gettysburg, was duly received. I did not know of anyh order was issued by General Lee. About sunrise on the 2nd of July I was sent by General Lee to General Ewell to ask him whaybreak, as I have already stated, on the morning of the 2d of July. My division soon commenced filing into an open field n Had the conflict been renewed by it at daylight on the 2nd of July, with the First and Eleventh corps exhausted by battle, neral Early broke up General Lee's line of battle on the 2d of July, by detaching part of his division on some uncalled — fo
having been repulsed before the rest of the force came up. It was then on the extreme right from which troops were taken, so as to leave only one brigade there. This was at Culp's Hill and on the right of it (the enemy's), where the sides of the hill were wooded and exceedingly rugged. This part of the line confronted Johnson's division, while Cemetery Hill itself was held by the First and Eleventh corps, which Butterfield sbows in his testimony numbered more than 10,000 men on the 4th of July, after all the fighting on the 2nd and 3rd. In addition, the Second corps, Hancock's, was on the left of the Eleventh corps, connecting with it. That corps had three divisions, only one of which was sent to the enemy's left during Longstreet's attack. The attack mentioned by Meade as having been made on the Eleventh corps, when troops from the Second and First corps came to its assistance, was the.attack made by my two brigades described in my Review. That attack began sooner than M
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