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West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ly dissent. The Trans-Mississippi Department was then practically severed from the Confederacy by the investment of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. To have confined our efforts east of the Mississippi to an entirely defensive policy would have exposed us to a certain, though slow process of exhaustion. We would have had not only to defend our northern frontier, on a line from the Chesapeake bay, up the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers, across the Upper Valley of the Shenandoah, and through Western Virginia, Middle Tennessee, and Northern Alabama and Mississippi, but also the entire coasts of Chesapeake bay and the Atlantic, on the east, from the mouth of the Rappahannock, south, and of the Gulf of Mexico on the south, with the enemy firmly in possession of a number of ports and harbors on said coasts, as well as a line in the west, parallel to and east of the Mississippi, with the enemy in possession of or besieging all of the towns on that river. This in fact would have required us to d
Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
d. When Johnson, later in the day, attacked the enemy's right flank, and two of my brigades advanced to the crest of Cemetery Hill and got possession of the enemy's batteries, the divisions on my right that were to have co-operated did not move, an two brigades became engaged the two divisions on my right had advanced promptly, we would have secured a lodgment on Cemetery Hill that would have ensured us tle victory. Again: On the 3d the attack from our right was to have been made at a ver renewing the battle, General Lee directed me to reconnoitre the position to which the enemy had retired. I found Cemetery Hill occupied by a considerable force, a part strongly posted behind a stone fence near its crest, and the rest on the reverates would probably have been successful: 1st.-Had Ewell and Hill pushed Howard's broken troops over the top of Cemetery Hill on the first day. 2d. Had Longstreet reached the field earlier on the second day and secured and held Round Top.
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
a. He sought an encounter with his opponent, but upon his own terms as to time and place. He justly felt great confidence in his army, and hoped to select a favorable position, where he could receive the attack which the enemy would be compelled to make, and from which, if successful, he could seriously threaten the Federal capital. The condition of the army at this time was excellent; never was I so impressed by its morale as when the two corps of Hill and Longstreet passed through Chambersburg. Now as to the battle itself The first great disadvantage experienced by General Lee was the unexpected absence of his cavalry. Certain discretionary power had to be left with General Stuart as to where he would cross the Potomac. It was arranged that the movements of the enemy and his own judgment should determine this, but he was to connect at once with General Lee, keep on his flank, and advise him of the enemy's movements. After crossing the river General Stuart consumed some
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
unsurpassed length and brilliancy. It finally succumbed, solely from exhaustion, resulting from the mere process of. attrition, .caused by ntn constant contact with overwhelming numbers. But for the simultaneous disasters in the southwest, the campaign in Pennsylvania would not have materially impaired the chances for success of the Confederacy. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. A. Early. Letter from General A. L. Long. [Copy.] Charlottesville, April 5th, 1876. General J. A. Early: Dear Sir: General Lee and staff arrived on the field at Gettysburg near the close of the battle on the afternoon of July 1st-soon after Anderson's division arrived, but too late to participate in the action. About the same time Longstreet arrived in person, leaving his troops a few miles behind. The only troops that were on the ground were four divisions, which had just been engaged, and Anderson's division, which, in addition to a day's ma
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
it, which could only be done by threatening Washington or the States north of the Potomac; and the appened, it was necessary for us to threaten Washington or the States north of the Potomac. To have have been an impossibility. To threaten Washington, therefore, it was necessary to pass through. Looker hugged too closely the defences of Washington for us to attack him south of the Potomac, ao-as to endanger Meade's communications with Washington, I have this to say: It would have been an eNorthern Central railroad, and have run into Washington by rail before we could have gotten half wayo as to endanger Meade's communications with Washington. 5th. The heroic but foolish attack of ranks from a sympathizing population, while Washington, the capital of our opponents, would have neo as to endanger Meade's communications with Washington, as suggested by ----. He would have exposed movement against Richmond to the defence of Washington, and at the same time brought him within rea[9 more...]
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
rived in person, leaving his troops a few miles behind. The only troops that were on the ground were four divisions, which had just been engaged, and Anderson's division, which, in addition to a day's march, had just made a forced march from Cashtown. While discussing the question of renewing the battle, General Lee directed me to reconnoitre the position to which the enemy had retired. I found Cemetery Hill occupied by a considerable force, a part strongly posted behind a stone fencf Hill's corps on the 1st of July. This was the first intimation that General Lee received of. the proximity of the enemy's infantry. The first encounter was unexpected. Hill's troops became engaged; Ewell, whose orders were to concentrate at Cashtown or Gettysburg, heard the firing and turned towards Gettysburg. His advanced divisions-Rodes' and Early's-became engaged. The engagement now involved two of Hill's divisions and two of Ewell's-all of both corps them up. The result was a success
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Rapidan rivers, across the Upper Valley of the Shenandoah, and through Western Virginia, Middle Tennessee, and Northern Alabama and Mississippi, but also the entire coasts of Chesapeake bay and the Atlantic, on the east, from the mouth of the Rappahannock, south, and of the Gulf of Mexico on the south, with the enemy firmly in possession of a number of ports and harbors on said coasts, as well as a line in the west, parallel to and east of the Mississippi, with the enemy in possession of or bes. If we, had awaited a renewal of the attacks of the Army of the Potomac, we might have repulsed it again and again; but from the nature of the ground occupied by the two armies respectively, with a wide, low plain or the south bank of the Rappahannock between the heights occupied by us and the river, while the commanding heights on the north bank were close upon the river, and crowned with an immense armament of heavy guns, it was always practicable for the Army of the Potomac to recross t
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
just as it is said the constant dropping of water will wear away the hardest stone. Let us look at the condition of affairs at the close of May, 1863. The Federal forces held possession of Fortress Monroe, Yorktown and Norfolk in Virginia, with the control, by means of gunboats, of the Chesapeake, York river, and James river up to the mouth of the Appomattox — of the entire coast of North Carolina, except the mouth of Cape Fear river-of Port Royal and Beaufort island on the coast of South Carolina, with Charleston harbor blockaded and the city of Charleston besieged — of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah river, in Georgia--of the mouth of the St. John's river, Key West and Pensacola, in Florida--of the lower Mississippi, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Memphis, with Vicksburg and Port Hudson besieged, the fall of which latter towns was all that was necessary to give complete possession of the Mississippi river--of West Tennessee, the northern portion of Middle Tennessee, al
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
rger than it was at the beginning of the movement into Pennsylvania, by reason of the loss at Chancellorsville and at Fredericksburg at the same time. No reliance whatever is to be placed in the conjectural estimate of our strength for June of that power to penetrate Virginia in half a dozen places whenever he chose to do so. It was impossible to attack Hooker at Fredericksburg, when he was only 10 or 12 miles from his base on the water. As Lee moved northward Hooker kept his forces in front ence of Washington, and at the same time brought him within reach of ample supplies. But suppose Lee had remained at Fredericksburg on the strict defensive. This was to lose the results of the advantages gained at Chancellorsville. It was to yieldmpass the downfall of the Confederate capital. The Federal a13my had been twice beaten in attempting to advance from Fredericksburg. It was not probable that they would try that again, and Lee would probably have soon been forced to the vicinity of
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
force for duty in the Department of Northern Virginia consisted of 68,352 men and officers. The Department of Northern Virginia embraced all that portion of eastern Virginia and the Valley north of James river, and included all the troops within it. Of course, the movable army was less than the whole force in the department, as all that was necessary to give complete possession of the Mississippi river--of West Tennessee, the northern portion of Middle Tennessee, all of Kentucky, northwestern Virginia, including the Valley of the Kanawha, the lower Valley of Virginia, and all of eastern Virginia north of the Rappahannock. At the same time the entire coaeastern Virginia north of the Rappahannock. At the same time the entire coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico were so rigidly blockaded and patroled by war vessels, that it was a mere chance when the blockade was evaded. The large army under Grant, besieging Vicksburg and Port Hudson, could very readily have been brought against one or the other of our armies in the field on the fall of the b
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