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Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
to find out why it did not succeed. The solution to this point, in my judgment, is summed up in the simple sentence: Paucity of men and of resources. Other considerations are involved in a determination of the question, could the war have been further prolonged? but given an earnest determination on the part of a united North to prosecute the war to a successful issue; and ultimate success was certain. Consider the census of the United States, 1860. Excluding Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri, the States that entered the Confederacy had a white population of a little over 5,000,000; whereas those that sustained the United States government had 19,000,000. Then reflect that the South had no navy; its ports were blockaded, and intercourse with the outside world interdicted. Under such circumstances it is remarkable that the South maintained itself so long as it did. ---- asserts that the Army of Northern Virginia when it invaded Pennsylvania was more powerful than it had ever be
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
h place: The great relief to this country the withdrawal of the Federal army would have caused, as well as the immense relief given to the Commissary of the Confederate States, by the absence of the Army of Northern Virginia from the soil of Virginiathe question of supplies for man and beast being even at that time a troublesome on earnest determination on the part of a united North to prosecute the war to a successful issue; and ultimate success was certain. Consider the census of the United States, 1860. Excluding Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri, the States that entered the Confederacy had a white population of a little over 5,000,000; whereas those thaelieve success would have crowned his plan had it been faithfully carried out. As previously stated, I obtained access to the Archives of the War Department, U. S. A., and have taken copies of the original returns of our army. On the 31st May our effective strength as 68,352; but one brigade, Pettigrew's, joined the army afte
Beaufort Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ned on the defensive entirely, just as it is said the constant dropping of water will wear away the hardest stone. Let us look at the condition of affairs at the close of May, 1863. The Federal forces held possession of Fortress Monroe, Yorktown and Norfolk in Virginia, with the control, by means of gunboats, of the Chesapeake, York river, and James river up to the mouth of the Appomattox — of the entire coast of North Carolina, except the mouth of Cape Fear river-of Port Royal and Beaufort island on the coast of South Carolina, with Charleston harbor blockaded and the city of Charleston besieged — of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah river, in Georgia--of the mouth of the St. John's river, Key West and Pensacola, in Florida--of the lower Mississippi, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Memphis, with Vicksburg and Port Hudson besieged, the fall of which latter towns was all that was necessary to give complete possession of the Mississippi river--of West Tennessee, the northern
Westminster (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
danger of the capture or destruction of a large part of our trains. Look at the map of the country, if you have one, and recollect that we were on the north and west of Meade's position, which was really between us and Washington. In order to get near enough to Meade's line of communications, with Washington to threaten it, we would have had to make a wide circuit, while he had the inner and shorter line. If we had undertaken to get between him and Washington, he could have retired to Westminster, from whence there was a railroad to Baltimore, or to some point on the Northern Central railroad, and have run into Washington by rail before we could have gotten half way there, if he had desired to do so. Or, taking a bolder course, he might have moved down by the way of Ernmettsbnrg to Frederick, Md., where he would have been joined by 10,000 men under French,. taken possession of the passes of South mountain, and thus been on the line of our communications. If we had moved on Washin
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ges. Our failure to carry the position at Gettysburg was not due so much to the superior fightingtacks. Meade did not select the position at Gettysburg; but that position was forced on him by the essed by him who did direct it? I was at Gettysburg and participated in the first day's action —. A. L. Long, who was on Gen. Lee's staff at Gettysburg, received subsequently to the controversy beis efficiency on such an occasion as that at Gettysburg was materially impaired, by a constitutionalt in my view of the causes of our failure at Gettysburg, why it was that General Lee did not speak oeneral Lee and staff arrived on the field at Gettysburg near the close of the battle on the afternooehind to guard the trains, and did not reach Gettysburg until a late hour, and in the meantime the eLee did not consider the Federal position at Gettysburg stronger than many others that army had occuse orders were to concentrate at Cashtown or Gettysburg, heard the firing and turned towards Gettysb[28 more...]
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
my own, in regard to that battle. In conclusion, I must say that I do not regard the campaign in Pennsylvania as having resulted in such disastrous consequences to our arms as you seem to think attended them. It is true that we failed to win a great battle on the soil of Pennsylvania, but all the enemy's plans for the campaign in Virginia for that year were thwarted, and our aimy retired across the Potomac self-relying and defiant. When it confronted Meade for several days, near Hagerstown, Maryland, on the retreat, he dared not attack it. In the following autumn General Lee was able to detach one corps from the army, two divisions of which were sent to the assistance of Bragg's army in the southwest, and contributed materially to the victory of Chickamauga. InI the ensuing spring the Army of Northern Virginia was able to meet and cope with an army under Grant, originally of nearly if not quite thrice its numbers, which was also constantly receiving heavy reinforcements
Baltimore (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ton, chief of artillery; Generals Kemper, Lane and Scales; and Colonels Taylor, Marshall and Venable, of General Lee's staff Were I writing history, I should like to have the opinions of these officers upon this subject, from which, with the official reports in my possession, I would of course draw and write my own conclusions. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Fitzhugh Lee. Letter from Colonel William Allan, of Ewell's staff. McDoNOUGH School, Owings' Mill, Baltimore county, Md., April 26th, 1877. Rev. J. W. Jones, D. D. My dear Sir: The questions asked in the letter ofof January 21st, 1877, in regard to Gettysburg, are more or less fully discussed in my article on Gettysburg in the Southern Review, April, 1868. The views therein expressed as to the motives, policy, conduct and results of that campaign, I have reason to know agreed substantially with those of General Lee. I have procured a copy of the Review, corrected the errors and missprints, and se
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
powerful when it undertook the invasion of Pennsylvania than it had ever been before. I believe theat. The force with which Gen. Lee invaded Pennsylvania was really under 60,000 effectives, as I haound McClellan's army, through Maryland and Pennsylvania, in October, 1862. The Dutch farmers and housewives in Pennsylvania were probably very badly frightened, but the loss in disabled cavalry horst say that I do not regard the campaign in Pennsylvania as having resulted in such disastrous consefailed to win a great battle on the soil of Pennsylvania, but all the enemy's plans for the campaignhe establishment of the Confederate army in Pennsylvania, with its communications well secured, was of Northern Virginia, under Ewell, entered Pennsylvania on the 22d of June. The Federal army crossattle was not in Lee's design in going into Pennsylvania. He repeatedly stated that in consequence , a decided success for the Confederates in Pennsylvania would have exerted a powerful influence on [6 more...]
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
constant dropping of water will wear away the hardest stone. Let us look at the condition of affairs at the close of May, 1863. The Federal forces held possession of Fortress Monroe, Yorktown and Norfolk in Virginia, with the control, by means of gunboats, of the Chesapeake, York river, and James river up to the mouth of the Appomattox — of the entire coast of North Carolina, except the mouth of Cape Fear river-of Port Royal and Beaufort island on the coast of South Carolina, with Charleston harbor blockaded and the city of Charleston besieged — of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah river, in Georgia--of the mouth of the St. John's river, Key West and Pensacola, in Florida--of the lower Mississippi, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Memphis, with Vicksburg and Port Hudson besieged, the fall of which latter towns was all that was necessary to give complete possession of the Mississippi river--of West Tennessee, the northern portion of Middle Tennessee, all of Kentucky, northwe
Key West (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ion of Fortress Monroe, Yorktown and Norfolk in Virginia, with the control, by means of gunboats, of the Chesapeake, York river, and James river up to the mouth of the Appomattox — of the entire coast of North Carolina, except the mouth of Cape Fear river-of Port Royal and Beaufort island on the coast of South Carolina, with Charleston harbor blockaded and the city of Charleston besieged — of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah river, in Georgia--of the mouth of the St. John's river, Key West and Pensacola, in Florida--of the lower Mississippi, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Memphis, with Vicksburg and Port Hudson besieged, the fall of which latter towns was all that was necessary to give complete possession of the Mississippi river--of West Tennessee, the northern portion of Middle Tennessee, all of Kentucky, northwestern Virginia, including the Valley of the Kanawha, the lower Valley of Virginia, and all of eastern Virginia north of the Rappahannock. At the same time the entir
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