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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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1787. These differences seem to have ended in 1877. They were always political-relating to constrers admit the right. It may be safely said, in 1877, that this question will never again result in e destiny of the South that has been reached in 1877 is the final practical restoration to the Stateten years of terrible persecution, from 1867 to 1877; and it is with this right firmly secured that d from 1865 to 1867, than it was from thence to 1877. The war of reconstruction was a dishonorable is the fruit of reconciliation. The peace of 1877 relieves the anguish and heals the heart-burninin destruction. I have faith in the peace of 1877. It is just, reasonable, honorable, and constieviewed all the grounds upon which the peace of 1877 is founded, and after many tests of the ballot he North in their protests against the peace of 1877. The people of the North who approve and sup The men who saved the land from bloodshed in 1877, because the Constitution, though in some sense[3 more...]
try was only saved from the foulest disgrace that ever threatened a nation by the heroic moral courage of a few great spirits, who periled all-and, for a season, appeared to have lost everything — to prevent such a calamity. It is a pleasing and grateful duty to render honor to the purity and courage of these saviours of the country, who voted down the articles of impeachment. Do I pass the boundaries of actual legal and historic truth in defining the reconstruction of the States in 1867-8, and the enforcement of the measures and policy of this movement down to 1877, as being a state of war maintained by acts of warfare? There was no rebellion, insurrection, or domestic violence in any of the Southern States to require the President to send armies into them. No requisition for such forces were made either by the Governors or the Legislatures of any of these States. The forces of the United States that remained in the Southern States were not in any way disturbed, or mol
ck to 1787. These differences seem to have ended in 1877. They were always political-relating to constructions of the Constitution as applied to different measures that have been proposed. They never resulted from natural causes, such as give rise to the quarrels of different nations or races of men, except so far as they related to African slavery. They only became sectional when the measures which excited the discussion happened to affect a particular section of the country. In 1812 to 1815 some of the States of the North strongly threatened to secede from the Union, which then implied a desire to return to their former allegiance to the British Crown. In 1830 to 1832 there was manifested an almost fatal purpose in some of the States to assert the right to remain in the Union and set at defiance some of the laws which, though constitutional in form, were alleged to be locally oppressive. In 1861, the question of slavery furnished the occasion or provocation under which this
e been proposed. They never resulted from natural causes, such as give rise to the quarrels of different nations or races of men, except so far as they related to African slavery. They only became sectional when the measures which excited the discussion happened to affect a particular section of the country. In 1812 to 1815 some of the States of the North strongly threatened to secede from the Union, which then implied a desire to return to their former allegiance to the British Crown. In 1830 to 1832 there was manifested an almost fatal purpose in some of the States to assert the right to remain in the Union and set at defiance some of the laws which, though constitutional in form, were alleged to be locally oppressive. In 1861, the question of slavery furnished the occasion or provocation under which this ancient quarrel culminated in open war. While the question thus presented involved great political issues, it also included the dangerous element of race antagonism and race
relating to the period of actual and open war from 1861 to 1865. That field is yet but slightly gleaned, and it is indisto them. For a period of nearly three years the peace of 1865 remained almost unbroken. So far as the South was concernewar, and great capitulation, which had resulted in peace in 1865. In 1867 Congress broke the treaty made by the armies atr, without just cause or reasonable excuse. The peace of 1865 was not made by treaty between belligerent nations. The Cor maintained, after the conclusion of actual hostilities in 1865, as a means of adjusting finally the results of that struggn the people after the war, but it was less aggravated from 1865 to 1867, than it was from thence to 1877. The war of reconf 1877 is founded, and after many tests of the ballot since 1865, they have finally decreed that it is fixed, permanent, and inviolable. The volunteer armies of 1861 to 1865, in the main, have sustained the peace which they conquered and declare
f those constitutional rights which they have never agreed to surrender — which remain to them after four years of open warfare and nearly ten years of misrule and persecution-has removed the last obstacle to perfect reconciliation. Peace is the fruit of reconciliation. The peace of 1877 relieves the anguish and heals the heart-burnings of two wars — the open and honorable struggle of the war of 1861, and the military persecution of the war of 1867. Its reconciliation reaches back to 1820, when the slavery question began to agitate the country; nay, it goes back to the birth-day of the Constitution, with healing in its wings, and cures the grief and bitter memories of the past. Honest and patriotic people on all sides are prepared for this benediction of Heaven's good will to man. They desire that every human being shall be included in this blessing. Those who conquered in the war of 1861 turn with confidence and affection to the people of the South, and welcome them
ating to the period of actual and open war from 1861 to 1865. That field is yet but slightly gleat. Those who advocated the higher law prior to 1861, and forced the shedding of blood to meet that blessing. Those who conquered in the war of 1861 turn with confidence and affection to the peoplome day expunge it from the laws. The war of 1861 was not on either side a crime. It was the neceduced, surprised, nor betrayed into the war of 1861. After a vain search, the conquerors failed toent, and inviolable. The volunteer armies of 1861 to 1865, in the main, have sustained the peace th on all the issues that had led to the war of 1861. They did not believe that war was possible,ldiery, and the paroled prisoners of the war of 1861 and a poor and helpless people for its victims,e remain who had passed the meridian of life in 1861. They are tottering along the steep declivitiehe Oonfederacy are now, as they have been since 1861, the representative men of the South. Those wh[11 more...]
arnest attention of the Society to this matter, and hope that such action will be taken as will induce all fair-minded men to oppose appropriating public funds to publishing the Official history of the war until the Department adopts such rules as will allow citizens of every section free and equal opportunity of inspecting and verifying the originals of documents which it is proposed to publish. Finances. With the exception of the liberal donation of W. W. Corcoran, Esq., who, last November, added $500 to his donation of the year before, the Committee has been dependent for the means of carrying on its work upon membership fees and subscriptions to our Papers. The following summary will exhibit our receipts and disbursements, from November 1st, 1876, to October 30th, 1877: Receipts. Membership fees, subscriptions, and advertisements4,244 45 Donation of W. W. Corcoran, Esq500 00 Total receipts$4,744 45 Balance in treasury, as per last report51 94 Total funds$4,796 39
r list of subscribers at about what it was twelve months ago, and that we have bright prospects for a large increase during the coming year; and we are satisfied that we only need efficient canvassers to swell our list of members and subscribers several thousand, within a short time. Confederate archives at Washington. In our last annual report we gave an account of our unsuccessful efforts to gain access to the Confederate archives in charge of the War Department at Washington. In January last the Department reopened the correspondence with us, and seemed anxious to secure such documents as they need to complete their files. We reiterated our desire to give them the freeest access to our archives, and to furnish them copies of anything they might desire, provided they would reciprocate; but, as they declined to allow us access to the Archive Bureau, to give us in exchange any copies of documents, or to allow us any thing in return, save the doubtful advantage of advance she
uffered ten years of terrible persecution, from 1867 to 1877; and it is with this right firmly securion, which had resulted in peace in 1865. In 1867 Congress broke the treaty made by the armies at the supremacy of the Federal laws. The war of 1867 was waged for conquest, subjugation, and spoilsin defining the reconstruction of the States in 1867-8, and the enforcement of the measures and polihe war, but it was less aggravated from 1865 to 1867, than it was from thence to 1877. The war of r unoffending. The real purpose of the war of 1867 was to secure a presidential election. The imms ended, I believe, forever. The revolution of 1867 has at last failed of its purpose; ballot after861, and the military persecution of the war of 1867. Its reconciliation reaches back to 1820, whhe Robespierres and Marats of the revolution of 1867-leading the hordes of plunderers, who, with halthe perquisites of office. The revolution of 1867 promised richer rewards for public service, and[1 more...]
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