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Seminary hill (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
on the road to Gettysburg. A long delay then occurred in starting, on account of an immense wagon-train passing, said to belong to Johnson's division. At 2:30 A. M., July 2d, we took the road, (both battalions,) and by an easy march reached the neighborhood of Gettysburg about sun-up; halting in an open field, the command got breakfast, and 1 was sent to report the presence of the artillery reserve of Longstreet's corps on the field and ready for battle. I found General Longstreet on Seminary Hill with General Lee and Generals Heth and A. P. Hill, and Doctors Cullen and Maury, surgeons. Upon making my report, Gen. Longstreet ordered that the battalions be kept where they were until further orders. On the morning of the third of July, at day-light, the batteries of the First corps were all in position, extending from Hood, in front of the Round Top, to and beyond the peach orchard. At this point General Longstreet sent for rie, accompanied by Adjutant Owen. I rode to the rear
Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
nt, and as one of the enemy's batteries on Cemetery Hill was doing us some damage, I ordered the bry forces out that I found myself attacking Cemetery Hill with a single line of battle against not lllows: He then began a heavy fire on Cemetery Hill. It must not be thought that this wrathfus. IHe replied, pointing with his fist at Cemetery Hill: The enemy is there, and I am going to strbattle can take that position, pointing to Cemetery Hill. General Lee in reply to this ordered me third day, instead of making the attack on Cemetery Hill, we would have been successful. I cannot ommanding position that was known to us as Cemetery Hill, south of Gettysburg, and quickly showed arps, having been halted to let them pass. Cemetery Hill was not assailable from the town, and I de to my left, on a line with and commanding Cemetery Hill. Before Johnson got up the Federals were him after sunrise looking at the enemy on Cemetery Hill. I rode then into Gettysburg and was gone
Blacksburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
of Gettysburg. We continue to give papers bearing on this great battle written by men who participated in it. A few of our readers may weary of the discussion, but we have assurances from every quarter that this series is of deep interest, and of the highest historic value. We take pleasure in giving the following from a gallant soldier who led gallant troops from the gallant Old North State : Letter from General James H. Lane. Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College, Blacksburg, October 20, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: My dear sir: As great injustice has been done my gallant old brigade of North Carolinians in all the published accounts of the battle of Gettysburg that I have seen, and as you are now publishing in the Southern Historical Society Papers the brigade-reports of that great battle, I hope you will also publish mine, which I herewith enclose. I am sure the pnblic will consider this official paper, w
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
e of my visit deeply considering the critical condition of Pemberton's army at Vicksburg, around which Gen. Grant was then decisively drawing his lines. He informed me that he had in contemplation a plan for concentrating a succoring army at Jackson, Miss., under the command of General Johnston, with a view of driving Grant from before Vicksburg by a direct issue at arms. He suggested that possibly my corps might be needed to make the army strong enough to handle Grant, and asked me my views. I replied that there was a better plan, in my judgment, for relieving Vicksburg than by a direct assault upon Grant. I proposed that the army then concentrating at Jackson, Miss., be moved swiftly to Tullahoma, where General Bragg was then located with a fine army, confronting an army of about equal strength, under General Rosecranz, and that at the same time the two divisions of my corps be hurried forward to the same point. The simultaneous arrival of these reinforcements would give us a gr
Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
ere communicated to me officially as Chief of Artillery, First corns. On the night of the 30th June, I encamped near Greenwood, on the road to Gettysburg, with the two battalions composing the reserve artillery of the artillery of the First corps in consequence, the two battalions were not as well advanced as they otherwise would have been. We remained halted at Greenwood all day of the first of July. At about ten o'clock at night, July 1st, a courier came to my camp and delivered to me cut into the road from above. The orders were to allow these trains to precede us, and that we should go into camp at Greenwood, about ten miles from Chambersburg. My infantry was forced to remain in Greenwood until late in the afternoon of the Greenwood until late in the afternoon of the 1st. My artillery did not get the road until 2 o'clock on the morning of the 2d. General Lee spent the night with us, establishing his headquarters, as he frequently did, a short distance from mine. General Lee says of the movements of this day
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
rd the enemy was begun at once. Hill marched toward Gettysburg, and my corps followed, with the exception of Pickett's division, which was left at Chambersburg by General Lee's orders. Ewell was recalled from above-he having advanced as far as Carlisle. I was with General Lee most of that day (the 30th). At about noon the road in front of my corps was blocked by Hill's corps and Ewell's wagon train, which had cut into the road from above. The orders were to allow these trains to precede us, division was accordingly marched from its camp and lined along the road in the order of march by 8 o'clock the 1st of July. When the troops of Ewell's corps — it was Johnston's division in charge of Ewell's wagon trains, which were coming from Carlisle by the road west of the mountains-had passed the head of my column, I asked General Longstreet's staff officer, Major Fairfax, if my division should follow. He went off to enquire, and returned with orders for me to wait until Ewell's wagon tr
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
re retreat. It is the accepted principle of action in a rout. General Early, in his report of this day's work, says the enemy had been routed. He should, therefore, have been followed by everything that could have been thrown upon his heels, not so much to gain the heights, which were recognized as the rallying point, but to prevent his rallying at all in time to form lines for another battle. If the enemy had been routed this could and should have been done. In the Military Annals of Louisiana, (Napier Bartlett, Esq.,) in the account of this rout, he says: Hays had received orders through Early from General Ewell (though Lee's general instructions were subsequently the reverse) to halt at Gettysburg and advance no further in case he should succeed in capturing that place. But Hays now saw that the enemy were coming around by what is known as the Baltimore road, and were making for the heights — the Cemetery Ridge. This ridge meant life or death, and for the possession of it th
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
cretary of War. Mr. Seddon was at the time of my visit deeply considering the critical condition of Pemberton's army at Vicksburg, around which Gen. Grant was then decisively drawing his lines. He informed me that he had in contemplation a plan foring a succoring army at Jackson, Miss., under the command of General Johnston, with a view of driving Grant from before Vicksburg by a direct issue at arms. He suggested that possibly my corps might be needed to make the army strong enough to handle Grant, and asked me my views. I replied that there was a better plan, in my judgment, for relieving Vicksburg than by a direct assault upon Grant. I proposed that the army then concentrating at Jackson, Miss., be moved swiftly to Tullahoma, wherions, and even reinforcements, by those friendly to our cause, and would inevitably result in drawing Grant's army from Vicksburg to look after and protect his own territory. Mr. Seddon adhered to his original views; not so much, I think, from his
Rocky Hill, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
one left for another effort, and even if this is entirely successful it can only be so at a very bloody cost. I still desired to save my men and felt that if the artillery did not produce the desired effect I would be justified in holding Pickett off. I wrote this note to Colonel Walton at exactly 1 :.30 P. M.: Let the batteries open. Order great precision in firing. If the batteries at the peach orchard cannot be used against the point we intend attacking, let them open on the enemy at Rocky Hill. The cannonading which opened along both lines was grand. In a few moments a courier brought a note to General Pickett (who was standing near me) from Alexander, which, after reading, he handed to me. It was as follows: If you are coming at all you must come at once, or I cannot give you proper support; but the enemy's fire has not slackened at all; at least eighteen guns are still firing from the Cemetery itself. After I had read the note Pickett said to me: General, shall I advance?
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
wing Army Northern Virginia, I was announced as follows: Colonel J. B. Walton, of the battalion Washington Artillery, having reported for duty with this command, he is announced as Chief of Artillery. He will be obeyed and respected accordingly. By command of Major-General Longstreet. G. M. Sorrel, Assistant Adjutant-General. And on the 15th August, 1862, the following order was published to battery commanders: General order no. 32. headquarters, Taylor's house, near Gordonsville, August 15th, 1862. II. Colonel J. B. Walton, of the battalion Washington Artillery, is announced as Chief of Artillery of this command, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly. III. Battery commanders will report to him without delay, to be disposed of in such camp or camps as may be selected; making their regular reports to him, for consolidation and transmission to this office. By command of Major-General Longstreet. G. M. Sorrel, Assistant Adjutant-General. To Colo
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