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tions to some of the Confederate leaders who are still alive, and with whom you are in correspondence. The opinion of General Early, for whom I have the greatest consideration as a soldier, would be especially valuable for me. Of course I do not pledge myself to accept wholly any one's opinion, but it would be of the greatest importance for me to know what Confederate officers think now of the causes of their repulse at Gettysburg. Believe me, dear sir, yours truly, L. P. D'Orleans, Comte de Paris. [Address: Chateau d'eu Seine-Inferieure, France.] Letter from Maj. Scheibert, of the Prussian Royal Engineers. [As the opinion of a distinguished foreigner who witnessed the battle of Gettysburg and has manifested the liveliest interest in the discussion concerning it, the following letter will have an interest for all of our readers; but for those who knew the gallant Prussian, and appreciated his warm sympathy for our struggling people, it will have a peculiar interest.]
H. L. Benning (search for this): chapter 1.3
istory, selecting representatives of every corps and division of our army, and of every arm of the service. The replies received we forwarded to the Count of Paris, and have published in our papers without note or comment of our own. Besides these we have published at different times the official reports of Generals R. E. Lee, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, J. E. B. Stuart, Rodes, R. H. Anderson, Brigadier-General J. B. Robertson, Colonel W. W. White, commanding Anderson's brigade, Brigadier-General H. L. Benning, Brigadier-Gereral J. B. Kershaw, Colonel E. P. Alexander, and Brigadier-General J. H. Lane. The reports of Generals Early, and Ewell had been previously published in the Southern Magazine, and the report of General W. N. Pendleton, Chief of Artillery, Army Nothern Virginia, which is crowded out of this number, will be published hereafter. These letters and official reports, and the other papers which we have published have made a series which has excited wide interest and
Nothern Virginia (search for this): chapter 1.3
mes the official reports of Generals R. E. Lee, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, J. E. B. Stuart, Rodes, R. H. Anderson, Brigadier-General J. B. Robertson, Colonel W. W. White, commanding Anderson's brigade, Brigadier-General H. L. Benning, Brigadier-Gereral J. B. Kershaw, Colonel E. P. Alexander, and Brigadier-General J. H. Lane. The reports of Generals Early, and Ewell had been previously published in the Southern Magazine, and the report of General W. N. Pendleton, Chief of Artillery, Army Nothern Virginia, which is crowded out of this number, will be published hereafter. These letters and official reports, and the other papers which we have published have made a series which has excited wide interest and attention, and called forth warm expressions as to their value and importance. The Count of Paris says, in a recent letter concerning these papers: I cannot say how valuable, how interesting for one who wishes to reach the truth, these letters are. As far as opinions go they do not
J. William Jones (search for this): chapter 1.3
he very highest interest and value. We have thought proper to prefix these remarks to the letter which originated the series, which we now give in full as follows: Letter from the Count of Paris. Sevilla, January 21st, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear sir: I am writing the account of the battle of Gettysburg, and consider that chapter as the most important, the most difficult to write of the whole work which I have undertaken. I share tthe following letter will have an interest for all of our readers; but for those who knew the gallant Prussian, and appreciated his warm sympathy for our struggling people, it will have a peculiar interest.] Stuttgart, 21st Nov., 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Sec'y S. H. Soc'y: Dear sir: You will, perhaps, be surprised that a foreigner should desire to mingle in the discussion of the battle of Gettysburg; but I have some reasons which urge me to give you my opinion about that affair. 1. I w
I. Scheibert (search for this): chapter 1.3
which the campaign, and especially the battle of Gettysburg was managed by General Lee and his subordinates. It will be seen in the letter from our friend Major Scheibert, of the Prussian Royal Engineers, which we publish below, that he regards these papers as of the very highest interest and value. We have thought proper toulse at Gettysburg. Believe me, dear sir, yours truly, L. P. D'Orleans, Comte de Paris. [Address: Chateau d'eu Seine-Inferieure, France.] Letter from Maj. Scheibert, of the Prussian Royal Engineers. [As the opinion of a distinguished foreigner who witnessed the battle of Gettysburg and has manifested the liveliest inte if it could have advanced at any time and on any part of the field to one concentrated and combined attack on the enemy's position. This is the impression I have received from my personal observation, and from the valuable details of your exceedingly interesting papers. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, I. Scheibert.
Brigadier-Gereral J. B. Kershaw (search for this): chapter 1.3
of every corps and division of our army, and of every arm of the service. The replies received we forwarded to the Count of Paris, and have published in our papers without note or comment of our own. Besides these we have published at different times the official reports of Generals R. E. Lee, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, J. E. B. Stuart, Rodes, R. H. Anderson, Brigadier-General J. B. Robertson, Colonel W. W. White, commanding Anderson's brigade, Brigadier-General H. L. Benning, Brigadier-Gereral J. B. Kershaw, Colonel E. P. Alexander, and Brigadier-General J. H. Lane. The reports of Generals Early, and Ewell had been previously published in the Southern Magazine, and the report of General W. N. Pendleton, Chief of Artillery, Army Nothern Virginia, which is crowded out of this number, will be published hereafter. These letters and official reports, and the other papers which we have published have made a series which has excited wide interest and attention, and called forth warm
which the fights of the 2nd of July were directed does not show the same co-ordination which ensured the success of the Southern arms at Gaines' Mill and Chancellorsville. 4th. 1 do not understand why Lee, having gained some success on the 2nd, but found the Federal position very strong, did not attempt to turn it by the south, which was its weak place, by extending his right so as to endanger Meade's communications with Washington. 5th. The heroic but foolish attack of Pickett, on the 3rd, should never have been attempted. Longstreet seems to think that it was imposed upon him against his will by Lee. General Early says distinctly, in a paper published by the Southern Historical Society, that Longstreet deferred it so long that the Second corps could not co-operate with it as it would have done if the attack had taken place early in the morning. I hesitate very much between these two opinions. I put these questions to you in a letter which I wish you to keep private, at l
Jackson, whose place up to this time had not been filled. After this it was filled by Lee himself, who, like a father when the mother dies, seeks to fill both her place and his own in the house. He doubled his fighting qualities, he made the most judicious use of his cavalry, and the result was splendid, for the campaign of 1864 to the closing scene at Appomattox was the most brilliant which Lee ever fought. We European soldiers have only one wish, and that is that, like the battles of 1861 to 1863, the last campaign may find Southern authors and authorities to give special narratives and correct details of that famous series of battles, concerning which we are in comparative ignorance. The battle of Gettysburg would have been won by Lee's army if it could have advanced at any time and on any part of the field to one concentrated and combined attack on the enemy's position. This is the impression I have received from my personal observation, and from the valuable details of
whose place up to this time had not been filled. After this it was filled by Lee himself, who, like a father when the mother dies, seeks to fill both her place and his own in the house. He doubled his fighting qualities, he made the most judicious use of his cavalry, and the result was splendid, for the campaign of 1864 to the closing scene at Appomattox was the most brilliant which Lee ever fought. We European soldiers have only one wish, and that is that, like the battles of 1861 to 1863, the last campaign may find Southern authors and authorities to give special narratives and correct details of that famous series of battles, concerning which we are in comparative ignorance. The battle of Gettysburg would have been won by Lee's army if it could have advanced at any time and on any part of the field to one concentrated and combined attack on the enemy's position. This is the impression I have received from my personal observation, and from the valuable details of your exc
scale, found himself so much endangered that he was obliged to fight an offensive battle on the ground where Meade chose to wait for him. He ought to have manoeuvered in Virginia so as to bring on a battle before crossing the Potomac. 3rd. The way in which the fights of the 2nd of July were directed does not show the same co-ordination which ensured the success of the Southern arms at Gaines' Mill and Chancellorsville. 4th. 1 do not understand why Lee, having gained some success on the 2nd, but found the Federal position very strong, did not attempt to turn it by the south, which was its weak place, by extending his right so as to endanger Meade's communications with Washington. 5th. The heroic but foolish attack of Pickett, on the 3rd, should never have been attempted. Longstreet seems to think that it was imposed upon him against his will by Lee. General Early says distinctly, in a paper published by the Southern Historical Society, that Longstreet deferred it so long th
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