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Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
g the attack on Cemetery Hill, we would have been successful. These little extracts which General Longstreet uses again in his narrative, seem to appear as a. desirable connection and to ring out a public notice, that the younger and abler man referred to by General Lee was the commander of his First army corps, and as there are witnesses still living to testify that General Longstreet once said in the house of the late John Alexander, at Campbell Courthouse, just after the surrender at Appomattox, that in case of another war he would never fight under General Lee again, it is fair to presume that he, too, was conscious of his own superiority, if all this be true. Very many of us were not able to reconcile these reported utterances of General Lee with facts within our own knowledge; and General Longstreet was asked more than once to publish the whole letter that he claimed to have received from General Lee, that we might see the connection before and after the short sentence he p
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
ed on the field of Gettysburg for eighty-four days after the battle, making sketches and collecting data, and has since visited the field with over 1,000 commissioned officers who were engaged, forty-seven of them being Generals Commanding. General Hancock writes of him to General Humphrey's: Mr. Bachelder's long study of the field has given him a fund of accurate information in great detail, which I believe is not possessed by any one else. ) Letter from General Winfield Hancock. New York, January 17th, 1878. My dear General: I am in receipt of yours of the 14th inst., and in reply have to say, that in my opinion, if the Confederates had continued the pursuit of General Howard on the afternoon of the 1st July at Gettysburg, they would have driven him over and beyond Cemetery till. After I had arrived upon, the field, assumed the command, and made my dispositions for defending that point (say 4 P. M.), I do not think the Confederate force then present could have carrie
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
eral Lee ordered me to make the reconnoissance and return as soon as possible, led me to believe, if he intended to attack at all, such attack was to be made at an early hour. Colonel Johnston did not even know where General Iongstreet was going. He supposed he had been ordered to ride with him simply to give him the benefit of his reconnoissance. He must be surprised then, as he states, to find himself considered by Gen. Longstreet in charge of McLaws' division, First corps, Army Northern Virginia. I dwell on this point because it is a most important one. Gettysburg was lost by just this delay of several hours. Facts, however, do not warrant us in believing that General Longstreet was always so particular in following officers sent by General Lee to guide his column, because many of us recall that in the opening of the spring campaign of 1864, General Lee sent an engineer officer to General Longstreet, then encamped near Gordonsville, to guide him to the point he wanted him
Jordan's Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
charge of the acting chief of artillery for the corps, Colonel J. T. Brown. The works and their armament were alike formidable, and that they were thus rendered untenable by the enemy evinces at once the skill with which our batteries were disposed and the resolution with which they were served. The death of Captain Thompson, of the Louisiana guard artillery, a most gallant and esteemed officer, was part of the price of this victory. Retreating towards Charlestown, the enemy, near Jordan's Springs, on the morning of the 15th, encountered, with Johnson's division which had marched to intercept him, Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews' artillery battalion. The sharp action ensuing, which resulted in the rout of the enemy and capture of most of his men, was especially remarkable for the unexampled steadiness with which artillery fought infantry skirmishers at close quarters. Lieutenant Contee, who commanded a section in a contest of this kind, distinguished himself by cool and persistent d
Berryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
Contee were in this affair painfully, though not very dangerously wounded. While these events were transpiring at and near Winchester, General Rodes' division, accompanied by Lieutenant-Colonel Carter's artillery battalion, having marched by Berryville, approached Martinsburg, where was an additional force of the enemy. Under the well-directed fire of Colonel Carter's batteries that force speedily abandoned the town, leaving, in addition to twenty-three captured in Winchester, five superior supervision as were requisite and practicable, I marched towards the Valley, attending near the Commanding-General to be ready for such service as might be required. On the 25th, the army having sufficiently rested in camp near Millwood and Berryville, crossed the Potomac, the Third corps at Shepherdstown, the First at Williamsport — the Comir.anding-General being with the latter, and my duties lying near him. On Wednesday, 1st July, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, having been reached by easy
Fairfield, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
but others had fired scarcely a shot, and the presence of General Lee, who had now arrived, would have given a new impulse to the battle. It is probable strong efforts would have been made to hold the position until the troops of the Third and Second corps could be brought up. Although General Sickles reached the field at an earlier hour, only two brigades of his command arrived that night-these reaching the field at sunset. Two brigades were left at Emmettsburg to hold the pass towards Fairfield, and General Humphreys, with two brigades of his division, reached the field at 1 o'clock the next morning. The Second corps was ordered to move up to Gettysburg, but General Hancock met it on the road on his return to Taneytown, where he went to report to General Meade, and not considering its presence necessary, ordered it to go into bivouac. In case of an engagement, however, these troops could hardly have reached the field before nightfall. By this brief explanation you will see t
Georgetown (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
reserve. In this advance, general headquarters being with the First corps, my own were thereby also chiefly regulated. On June 16th, after a week at Culpeper of such artillery preparation and supervision as were requisite and practicable, I marched towards the Valley, attending near the Commanding-General to be ready for such service as might be required. On the 25th, the army having sufficiently rested in camp near Millwood and Berryville, crossed the Potomac, the Third corps at Shepherdstown, the First at Williamsport — the Comir.anding-General being with the latter, and my duties lying near him. On Wednesday, 1st July, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, having been reached by easy marches, and passed after a rest of one or two days, and the army being in motion towards Gettysburg, occasional cannon shots in that direction were heard by myself and others with the main body, as, before noon, we crossed the mountain. Two divisions of the Third corps, Heth's and Pender's, the form
Taneytown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
d sent word to that effect back to General Meade, who was then at Taneytown. Please notice the following extract from my testimony before thin mass, it is my recollection) Cemetery Hill, to the left of the Taneytown road. I at once sent Wadsworth's division of the First corps, emainder of the First corps I placed on the right and left of the Taneytown road, connecting with the left of the Eleventh corps. These were, under Major-General Doubleday, was on the right and left of the Taneytown road, and connected with the left of the Eleventh corps, which oche Gettysburg and Emmettsburg road, as well as the Gettysburg and Taneytown road to our rear. The Third corps, however, was in close proxttysburg, but General Hancock met it on the road on his return to Taneytown, where he went to report to General Meade, and not considering it hour, and a little after 6 A. M. had reached that portion of the Taneytown road, running along the slope of Little Round Top. Between the ho
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
of McLaws' division, First corps, Army Northern Virginia. I dwell on this point because it is a most important one. Gettysburg was lost by just this delay of several hours. Facts, however, do not warrant us in believing that General Longstreet was always so particular in following officers sent by General Lee to guide his column, because many of us recall that in the opening of the spring campaign of 1864, General Lee sent an engineer officer to General Longstreet, then encamped near Gordonsville, to guide him to the point he wanted him in the wilderness, but this officer was pushed aside by General Longstreet's saying he knew the route and had no use for his services. As a consequence, he lost his way and reached the wilderness twenty-four hours behind time, just as A. P. Hill was about to sustain a terrible disaster which Longstreet gallantly averted. This incident comes direct from General Lee himself, who cited it as an instance of Longstreet's habitual slowness. From kn
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
-Colonel Jones, and the general charge of the acting chief of artillery for the corps, Colonel J. T. Brown. The works and their armament were alike formidable, and that they were thus rendered untenable by the enemy evinces at once the skill with which our batteries were disposed and the resolution with which they were served. The death of Captain Thompson, of the Louisiana guard artillery, a most gallant and esteemed officer, was part of the price of this victory. Retreating towards Charlestown, the enemy, near Jordan's Springs, on the morning of the 15th, encountered, with Johnson's division which had marched to intercept him, Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews' artillery battalion. The sharp action ensuing, which resulted in the rout of the enemy and capture of most of his men, was especially remarkable for the unexampled steadiness with which artillery fought infantry skirmishers at close quarters. Lieutenant Contee, who commanded a section in a contest of this kind, distinguished
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