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Plevna (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
elieving he crossed the Potomac bound fast by a promise to a subordinate to make the movement strategically offensive tactically defensive, as charged by General Longstreet, but such reported promise contains a positive reflection upon General Lee's military sagacity. As well might the Czar of Russia, acting as commander-in-chief of his army, have so committed himself to the Grand Duke Nicholas, or under like circumstances, the Sublime Porte have tied himself up to Osman Pasha, the hero of Plevna. The truth is, General Lee and his army were full of fight, their objective point was the Federal army of the Potomac, and those people the Confederate chief had resolved to strike whenever and wherever the best opportunity occurred, strategically offensive and tactically defensive, to the contrary notwithstanding. An army of invasion is naturally an offensive one in strategy and tactics, and history rarely points to an instance where it has been concentrated on a given point to patiently
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
capture of his guns and stores, most valuable service was rendered by the artillery under the immediate command of Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, and the general charge of the acting chief of artillery for the corps, Colonel J. T. Brown. The works and their armament were alike formidable, and that they were thus rendered untenable by the enemy evinces at once the skill with which our batteries were disposed and the resolution with which they were served. The death of Captain Thompson, of the Louisiana guard artillery, a most gallant and esteemed officer, was part of the price of this victory. Retreating towards Charlestown, the enemy, near Jordan's Springs, on the morning of the 15th, encountered, with Johnson's division which had marched to intercept him, Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews' artillery battalion. The sharp action ensuing, which resulted in the rout of the enemy and capture of most of his men, was especially remarkable for the unexampled steadiness with which artillery fought
Culp's Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
nded the lines. I sent General Wadsworth to the right to take possession of Culp's Hill with his division. I directed General Geary, whose division belonged to theh's division of the First corps, and a battery of artillery, to take post on Culp's Hill, on our right. The remainder of the First corps I placed on the right and lould have been a less formidable antagonist than we found it on the 2d, from Culps' Hill to Round Top. The Confederates, too, would have sufferred an additional lossthe Federal forces on the 2nd of July: I begin on their right: At 6 A. M. Culp's Hill was only occupied by Wadsworth's division, First corps, and Stevens' Fifth M corps from the night before, but about this time they began to move over to Culp's Hill, where they formed on a prolongation of Wadsworth's line, already mentioned.ger had taken his division, and with Lockwood's regiments, had moved over to Culp's Hill and formed on a prolongation of Geary's line. Notice how Meade was increasi
Falling Waters (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
tly forebore, and it being undesirable to await him longer, our army was on the night of the 13th withdrawn to the south bank of the Potomac. In this movement, necessarily involving much labor, greatly increased difficulty was imposed upon those responsible for artillery operations by the enfeebled condition of horses, drawing through roads saturated with rain, and by the swolen state of the river, which confined the whole army, train and all, to one route across the pontoon bridge at Falling Waters. Still, the task was cheerfully undertaken, and in the main successfully accomplished. With the exception of a few caissons, abandoned by some officers because teams could draw them no longer, and two guns left by those in charge for like reason, the battalions were entirely across by noon of the 14th; After crossing, Carter's guns were placed in position on the hills just below the bridge, some of Garnett's on that just above. Lane's 20-pound Parrotts were also posted some distance f
Loudoun (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
ne, a large body of Federal cavalry supported by infantry, and forcing them to recross the Rappahannock river with a loss (to them) of four hundred prisoners, three pieces of artillery, and several colors, (General Lee's report), marched into Loudoun county upon the right flank of the army, and was engaged in a series of conflicts, terminating with Pleasonton's cavalry corps and Barnes' division of infantry, upon the 21st June, which caused him to retire to the vicinity of Ashby's Gap in the Blus' brigade, and therefore underestimates the number in some of the other brigades.) There is no authenticated return after the above date until August. After the return above cited, the losses at Brandy Station fight, the three days fighting in Loudoun, the encounter at Westminster, Maryland, Hanover, Pennsylvania, and other points, occurred, together with the usual reduction of mounted troops from long and rapid marching. It is proper to say that the return quoted did not include the command
Manchester, Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
d along the road through McSherrytown, marching until between two and three o'clock in the morning, and bivouacked at a town called Brushtown; and before dawn on Thursday, the 2nd of July, a staff-officer of General Sykes, then commanding the corps, rode to my headquarters and directed me to march my men, without giving them any coffee, at once to the field. I placed the column in motion and arrived before noon in the rear of the other divisions of the corps. The Sixth corps was at Manchester on the evening of the 1st, and marched all of that night and until two o'clock P. M. on the 2nd, before it reached the field. It has been stated that Steinwehr's division of Howard's corps, dn the first day, threw up lunettes around each gun, on Cemetery Hill-solid works of such height and thickness as to defy the most powerful bolts which the enemy could throw against them-with smooth and perfectly level platforms on which the guns could be worked. This is a great error; there were
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
et was a hard fighter when once engaged, I have never found any one who claimed that he was a brilliant strategist; indeed, upon the only occasions when he exercised an independent command, Suffolk and Knoxville, the results in the public mind were not satisfactory. It is, therefore, with some surprise we learn from his paper that when in Richmond, en route from Suffolk to join General Lee at Fredericksburg, he paused to tell Mr. Seddon (then Secretary of War), how to relieve Pemberton at Vicksburg. Our astonishment is increased when we read further, that before entering upon the campaign of 1863, he exacted a promise from General Lee that the campaign should be one of offensive strategy, but defensive tactics, and upon this understanding my (his) assent was given, and that therefore General Lee gave the order of march. Our wonder culminates when finally we are told that he had a plan to fight the battle different from General Lee's, and that General Lee had since said it would hav
Westminster (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
timates the number in some of the other brigades.) There is no authenticated return after the above date until August. After the return above cited, the losses at Brandy Station fight, the three days fighting in Loudoun, the encounter at Westminster, Maryland, Hanover, Pennsylvania, and other points, occurred, together with the usual reduction of mounted troops from long and rapid marching. It is proper to say that the return quoted did not include the commands of Jenkins, Imboden, or White. elieved by the Second corps, which had arrived at 7 A. M., and gone into position on Cemetery Ridge. The two remaining brigades of the Third corps left at Emmettsburg got up about 9 A. M., relieving Buford's cavalry, which was ordered back to Westminster to protect the depot of supplies. About the same time General Tyler came up with eight batteries of artillery. At halfpast 10 A. M. Major McGilverey reached the field with the artillery reserve and ammunition train. At this hour the Federal
Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
43;) that it involved a loss of material and men to the enemy and drew Kilpatrick's and Gregg's divisions of cavalry from their aggressive attitude on Mead's flank and front, leaving only Buford's to watch for the advance of our troops, and hence we find only his two brigades in the Federal front on the first of July; that it kept the Sixth Federal corps, some 15,000 men, from reaching Gettysburg until after 3 P. M. on the 2nd of July; that it caused General Meade to send General French to Frederick, to protect his communications, with from 5,000 to 7,000 men, (the latter figure is Walter Taylor's estimate, page 113, Four years with General Lee,) and prevented that body of troops from being made use of in other ways — which force, Butterfield says, Hooker (before being relieved) contemplated throwing, with Slocum's corps, in General Lee's rear; and finally, that there was inflicted a loss upon the enemy's cavalry of confessedly near 5,000. (Stuart's report, p. 76, August No., 1876, S
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
we learn from his paper that when in Richmond, en route from Suffolk to join General Lee at Fredericksburg, he paused to tell Mr. Seddon (then Secretary of War), how to relieve Pemberton at Vicksburgia was undoubtedly undertaken with a view of manoeuvering the Federal army, then in front of Fredericksburg, to a safer distance from the Confederate capital; to relieve Virginia of the presence of bosomewhat retarded by delays on the part of battalion commanders. The severe contests near Fredericksburg, early in May, having resulted disastrously to the enemy, opportunity was allowed us of repacond corps having already marched toward Culpeper, the enemy appeared in some force opposite Fredericksburg, and in the afternoon opened a heavy artillery fire near the mo uth of Deep Run, under covercontest, beyond cavalry skirmishing, he declined. The Third corps, on the 15th June, left Fredericksburg en route for Culpeper and the Shennandoah Valley, via Front Royal, accompanied by its artill
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