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Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
e there are very few who will deny that General Longstreet was a hard fighter when once engaged, I have never found any one who claimed that he was a brilliant strategist; indeed, upon the only occasions when he exercised an independent command, Suffolk and Knoxville, the results in the public mind were not satisfactory. It is, therefore, with some surprise we learn from his paper that when in Richmond, en route from Suffolk to join General Lee at Fredericksburg, he paused to tell Mr. Seddon (Suffolk to join General Lee at Fredericksburg, he paused to tell Mr. Seddon (then Secretary of War), how to relieve Pemberton at Vicksburg. Our astonishment is increased when we read further, that before entering upon the campaign of 1863, he exacted a promise from General Lee that the campaign should be one of offensive strategy, but defensive tactics, and upon this understanding my (his) assent was given, and that therefore General Lee gave the order of march. Our wonder culminates when finally we are told that he had a plan to fight the battle different from Genera
York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
with the existing doubt as to what portion of the Federal army was then within supporting distance of the First and Eleventh corps, the arrival at a most inopportune moment of what proved to be a false report, that the enemy were advancing on the York road, which would have brought them in the rear of the Confederate troops; the time consumed in investigating the report; the apparent strength of the enemy's position; would all combine to make a subordinate commander hesitate to take the respons Heth's and Pender's, the former with Pegram's artillery battalion, the latter with McIntosh's, were in advance on this road; while of the Second corps, Early's division, attended by Jones' artillery battalion was approaching from the direction of York, and Rodes' from that of Carlisle, accompanied by Carter's battalion. The advance of the Third corps had encountered, at Gettysburg, a force of the enemy, and the firing heard was the beginning of the battle. Its significance, however, was not t
Seneca Falls (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
ries of conflicts, terminating with Pleasonton's cavalry corps and Barnes' division of infantry, upon the 21st June, which caused him to retire to the vicinity of Ashby's Gap in the Blue Ridge, our infantry being upon the western side of the mountains. 165 Leaving the brigade before mentioned to hold the position, Stuart then, in the exercise of a discretion given him by General Lee and so stated in his report, determined to pass to the rear of the Federal army and cross the Potomac at Seneca Falls, a point between that army and their capital. Thus, it will be seen, including the brigade and battalion of cavalry which composed the vanguard of the army, that over one-half of the cavalry was left in position to be used by General Lee. Hooker, in his dispatch to his President, June 21st, (Report on the Conduct of the War, volume 1, page 279,) referring to Stuart's command, says: This cavalry force has hitherto prevented me from obtaining satisfactory information as to the whereabou
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
ently rested in camp near Millwood and Berryville, crossed the Potomac, the Third corps at Shepherdstown, the First at Williamsport — the Comir.anding-General being with the latter, and my duties lying near him. On Wednesday, 1st July, Chambersburecond corps, were detailed to report to General Imboden at Cash Town, and aid in guarding the main wagon train back to Williamsport. The battalions generally remained in position most of the day. Nothing, however, was attempted by the enemy. That nenemy's country infested by cavalary detachments, the batteries accompanying General Imboden arrived with the train at Williamsport late on the 5th, and on the 6th did excellent service in repelling an attack of the enemy. On the 7th the artillery fortified line of battle, whose left rested on heights west of Hagerstown, and right on the Potomac, some miles below Williamsport. In full expectation of a decisive battle here, the army was by the Commanding-General called upon for its utmost e
Seminary (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
nd proceeded to join the other troops of their corps on the left; and Colonel Brown, acting chief of artillery for that corps, sent to find, if practicable, an artillery route towards a wooded height commanding the enemy's right. No farther attack, however, was made, and night closed upon the scene. Early on the morning of the 2d the enemy, being now strongly posted on the heights to which he had retired the previous evening, the artillery of the Second corps occupied positions from the Seminary hill round to the left, the gallant Major Latimer, commanding Andrews' battalion, being on the extreme left, and Colonel Brown's battalion, under Captain Dance, on the right, near the Seminary. Further to the right, on Seminary Ridge, Colonel Walker posted the artillery of the Third corps, except Poague's battalion and a portion of Garnett's, held for a season in reserve. From the farthest occupied point on the right and front, in company with Colonels Long and Walker, and Captain Johnson
Seminary Ridge (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
o farther attack, however, was made, and night closed upon the scene. Early on the morning of the 2d the enemy, being now strongly posted on the heights to which he had retired the previous evening, the artillery of the Second corps occupied positions from the Seminary hill round to the left, the gallant Major Latimer, commanding Andrews' battalion, being on the extreme left, and Colonel Brown's battalion, under Captain Dance, on the right, near the Seminary. Further to the right, on Seminary Ridge, Colonel Walker posted the artillery of the Third corps, except Poague's battalion and a portion of Garnett's, held for a season in reserve. From the farthest occupied point on the right and front, in company with Colonels Long and Walker, and Captain Johnson (engineer), I soon after sunrise surveyed the enemy's position towards some estimate .of the ground, and the best mode of attack. So far as from such a view judgment could be formed, assault on the enemy's left by our extreme righ
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
re at Gettysburg, because, in a spirit of magnanimity which has excited the highest admiration both in this country and in Europe, he said on the field of Gettysburg, It is all my fault, as he had said in like spirit to Stonewall Jackson at Chancellorsville, The victory is yours, not mine, will excite only surprise and not carry conviction to the minds of the old soldiers of General Lee, who knew the General's habit of self-depreciation. The effort must therefore fail in its purpose. Now le you were generally recognized as exercising a general command for the fight by me, and the other commands I was in contact with. Similar authority was frequently conferred on you — for instance, at Ashby's Gap, Downesville, and notably at Chancellorsville. Colonel W. M. Owens, then Colonel Walton's own adjutant, writes me that late on the night of July 2d, he found wagon and Colonel Walton on Cashtown road; slept until dawn; firing heard on right; saddled and rode to front. Firing was from
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
, the batteries accompanying General Imboden arrived with the train at Williamsport late on the 5th, and on the 6th did excellent service in repelling an attack of the enemy. On the 7th the artillery, with the body of the army, encamped near Hagerstown, without material incident since leaving Gettysburg. Men and animals were, however, much fatigued, and the latter greatly worn down by the hard service they had endured with light fare, and by heavy draught in roads rendered deep by continued battle. On the 10th, attack being threatened by the enemy, the artillery, partaking the hopeful expectations of the whole army, earnestly participated in forming an extended and fortified line of battle, whose left rested on heights west of Hagerstown, and right on the Potomac, some miles below Williamsport. In full expectation of a decisive battle here, the army was by the Commanding-General called upon for its utmost efforts, and I was specially directed to see that everything possible
Swan Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
, the army was by the Commanding-General called upon for its utmost efforts, and I was specially directed to see that everything possible was accomplished by the artillery. Accordingly for three days, during which the enemy was waited for, my best energies were given, with those of others, to the work of arrangement and preparation. The enemy, however, prudently forebore, and it being undesirable to await him longer, our army was on the night of the 13th withdrawn to the south bank of the Potomac. In this movement, necessarily involving much labor, greatly increased difficulty was imposed upon those responsible for artillery operations by the enfeebled condition of horses, drawing through roads saturated with rain, and by the swolen state of the river, which confined the whole army, train and all, to one route across the pontoon bridge at Falling Waters. Still, the task was cheerfully undertaken, and in the main successfully accomplished. With the exception of a few caissons, a
Rock Creek, Menard County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
the Twelfth corps, and Ruger had taken his division, and with Lockwood's regiments, had moved over to Culp's Hill and formed on a prolongation of Geary's line. Notice how Meade was increasing the forces opposed to our left — the Fifth corps numbering, on the 10th of June, 1863, 10,136 for duty, to which was added a portion of the Pennsylvania reserves, some 4,000 or 5,000, (Butterfield, then chief of Meade's staff, testimony before Committee on Conduct of the War, page 428,) moved across Rock Creek, was massed and held in reserve, where it lay until called upon to support Sickles in the afternoon, when its place was taksn by the Sixth corps, which arrived at 3 P. M., having marched 32 miles since 9 P. M. on the first-(Meade's testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, page 438). This was the largest of the seven corps Meade had at Gettysburg, and on the 10th of June, 1863, numbered, for duty, 15,408. (Butterfield, page 428). It will be perceived that when two-thirds o
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