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tyfirst Alabama, the Sixth and Ninth Kentucky, and Cobb's battery, all of Hanson's brigade, was ordered to take and hold this hill, which he did, repulsing several brisk attacks of the enemy, and losing some excellent officers and men. A few hundred yards to the left and rear of this position a small earthwork, thrown up under the direction of Major Graves, my Chief of Artillery, was held during a part of the operations by Semple's battery of Napoleon guns. In the afternoon of Tuesday, the 30th, I received intelligence from Lieutenant-General Hardee that the divisions of Cleburne and McCown were to be transferred to the extreme left, and soon after an order came to me from the General Commanding to hold the hill at all hazards. I immediately moved the remainder of Hanson's Brigade to the hill and strengthened Cobb's battery with a section from Lumsden's battery and a section from Slocomb's Washington Artillery. At the same time Adams' brigade was moved from the right and formed on
Battle of Murfreesboro. We purpose publishing during this year a number of reports and other papers concerning the operations of our western armies; and we feel sure that our readers will thank us for presenting the following reports of the battle of Murfreesboroa by the lamented Breckinridge and the gallant General Gibson: Report of General J. C. Breckinridge.headquarters Breckinridge's division, January--, 1863. Major T. B. Roy, A. A. Gen.: sir: I have the honor to report the operations of this division of Lieutenant-General Hardee's corps in the recent battles of Stone River in front of Murfreesboroa. The character and course of Stone river and the nature of the ground in front of the town are well known, and as the report of the General Commanding will no doubt be accompanied by a sketch, it is not necessary to describe them here. On the morning of Sunday the 28th of December, the brigades moved from their encampments and took up line of battle about one and a
January 2nd (search for this): chapter 3.14
ght Thursday morning Palmer was in position on the right of Hanson. No general engagement occurred on this day, the troops generally being employed in replenishing the ammunition, cooking rations, and obtaining some repose. On Friday, the 2d of January, being desirious to ascertain if the enemy was establishing himself on the east bank of the river, Lieutenant-Colonel Buckner and Major Graves, with Captain Byrne's battery and a portion of the Washington Artillery, under Lieutenant D. C. Vaullow us. My acknowledgments are due to Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, Lieutenant-Colonel Brent, and Lieutenant-Colonel Garner, of General Bragg's staff, and to Major Pickett, of Lieutenant-General Hardee's staff, for services on Friday, the 2d of January. Respectfully, your obedient servant, John C. Breckinridge, Major-General, C. S. A. Report of Colonel R. L. Gibson. headquarters Adams' brigade, Breckinridge's division, Hardee's corps, A. T., Tullahoma, January 11th, 1863. Colon
January 4th (search for this): chapter 3.14
y headquarters, and pursued his duties through the fire of Wednesday. Mr. Buckner and Mr. Zantzinger, of Kentucky, attached themselves to me for the oocasion and were active and zealous. Captain Blackburn, commanding my escort, ever cool and vigilant, rendered essential service, and made several bold reconnoisances. Charles Choutard of the escort, acting as my orderly on Wednesday, displayed much gallantry and intelligence. The army retired before daybreak on the morning of the 4th of January. My division, moving on the Manchester road, was the rear of Hardee's corps. The Ninth Kentucky, Forty-first Alabama, and Cobb's battery, all under the command of Colonel Hunt, formed a special rear-guard. The enemy did not follow us. My acknowledgments are due to Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, Lieutenant-Colonel Brent, and Lieutenant-Colonel Garner, of General Bragg's staff, and to Major Pickett, of Lieutenant-General Hardee's staff, for services on Friday, the 2d of January. Re
December 28th (search for this): chapter 3.14
vision, January--, 1863. Major T. B. Roy, A. A. Gen.: sir: I have the honor to report the operations of this division of Lieutenant-General Hardee's corps in the recent battles of Stone River in front of Murfreesboroa. The character and course of Stone river and the nature of the ground in front of the town are well known, and as the report of the General Commanding will no doubt be accompanied by a sketch, it is not necessary to describe them here. On the morning of Sunday the 28th of December, the brigades moved from their encampments and took up line of battle about one and a half miles from Murfreesboroa in the following order: Adams' brigade on the right, with its right resting on the Lebanon road and its left extending towards the ford over Stone river a short distance below the destroyed bridge on the Nashville turnpike; Preston on the left of Adams; Palmer on the left of Preston, and Hanson forming the left of the line, with his left resting on the right bank of the ri
Battle of Murfreesboro. We purpose publishing during this year a number of reports and other papers concerning the operations of our western armies; and we feel sure that our readers will thank us for presenting the following reports of the battle of Murfreesboroa by the lamented Breckinridge and the gallant General Gibson: Report of General J. C. Breckinridge.headquarters Breckinridge's division, January--, 1863. Major T. B. Roy, A. A. Gen.: sir: I have the honor to report the operations of this division of Lieutenant-General Hardee's corps in the recent battles of Stone River in front of Murfreesboroa. The character and course of Stone river and the nature of the ground in front of the town are well known, and as the report of the General Commanding will no doubt be accompanied by a sketch, it is not necessary to describe them here. On the morning of Sunday the 28th of December, the brigades moved from their encampments and took up line of battle about one and a
January 11th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 3.14
enemy did not follow us. My acknowledgments are due to Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, Lieutenant-Colonel Brent, and Lieutenant-Colonel Garner, of General Bragg's staff, and to Major Pickett, of Lieutenant-General Hardee's staff, for services on Friday, the 2d of January. Respectfully, your obedient servant, John C. Breckinridge, Major-General, C. S. A. Report of Colonel R. L. Gibson. headquarters Adams' brigade, Breckinridge's division, Hardee's corps, A. T., Tullahoma, January 11th, 1863. Colonel T. O'Hara, A. A. A. G.: Sir: I beg leave to submit the following report of the part taken by the Thirteenth Louisiana volunteers in the action of the 31st: We were posted on the right of Adams' brigade, the right of the regiment resting near the river and the two left companies overlapping the rail-track. We advanced in line of battle until we reached the houses destroyed by fire, and the point at which the ground swelled into a considerable hill, stretching towards the
ngly posted in two lines of battle supported by numerous batteries. One of his lines had the protection of the railroad cut, forming an excellent breastwork. We had no artillery, the nature of the ground forbidding its use. It was deemed reckless to attack with the force present. Night was now approaching. Presently the remainder of Lieutenant-General Hardee's corps came up on the left, and with McCown's command and a part of Cheatham's prolonged the line of battle in that direction. Adam's brigade also appeared and formed on the right of Preston. The troops bivouaced in position. The Commanding-General expecting an attack upon his right the next morning, ordered me during the night, to recross the river with Palmer's brigade. Before daylight Thursday morning Palmer was in position on the right of Hanson. No general engagement occurred on this day, the troops generally being employed in replenishing the ammunition, cooking rations, and obtaining some repose. On Friday
les from Murfreesboroa in the following order: Adams' brigade on the right, with its right resting the Nashville turnpike; Preston on the left of Adams; Palmer on the left of Preston, and Hanson for, a little in advance of the right of Brigadier-General Adams. My division formed the front lincomb's Washington Artillery. At the same time Adams' brigade was moved from the right and formed o see at a distance the brigades of Jackson and Adams recoiling from a very hot fire of the enemy. of Generals Bragg and Polk, to rally and form Adams' brigade, which was falling back chiefly betwerage and determination of these troops. General Adams having received a wound while gallantly le join his brigade (Preston's). The brigades of Adams and Preston, which were left on the west side w on the right. Preston supported Pillow, and Adams' brigade (commanded by Colonel Gibson) supportort of Colonel R. L. Gibson. headquarters Adams' brigade, Breckinridge's division, Hardee's co[4 more...]
of timber from which we emerged to the assault. The enemy did not advance beyond the position in which he received — our attack. My skirmishers continued to occupy a part of the field over which we advanced until the army retired from Murfreesboroa. The action lasted about one hour and twenty minutes. As our lines advanced to the attack several rounds of artillery were heard from our center, apparently directed against the enemy on the west bank of the river. About twilight Brigadier-General Aiiderson reported to me with his brigade, and remained in position with me until the army retired. I took up line of battle for the night a little in rear of the field over which we advanced to the assault, and Captain Robertson at my request disposed the artillery in the positions indicated for it. Many of the reports do not discriminate between the losses of Wednesday and Friday. The total loss in my division, exclusive of Jackson's command, is 2,140, of which, I think, 1,700 occurr
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