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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 17 total hits in 8 results.

Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.29
Book notice. Fitzhugh St. Clair, the S. C. Rebel boy, by Mrs. Sallie F. Chapin, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.29
in, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of s had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.29
Book notice. Fitzhugh St. Clair, the S. C. Rebel boy, by Mrs. Sallie F. Chapin, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.
Sallie F. Chapin (search for this): chapter 3.29
Book notice. Fitzhugh St. Clair, the S. C. Rebel boy, by Mrs. Sallie F. Chapin, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.
Book notice. Fitzhugh St. Clair, the S. C. Rebel boy, by Mrs. Sallie F. Chapin, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.
Book notice. Fitzhugh St. Clair, the S. C. Rebel boy, by Mrs. Sallie F. Chapin, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.
Book notice. Fitzhugh St. Clair, the S. C. Rebel boy, by Mrs. Sallie F. Chapin, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.
Clair.Fitzhugh St. Clair (search for this): chapter 3.29
Book notice. Fitzhugh St. Clair, the S. C. Rebel boy, by Mrs. Sallie F. Chapin, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.