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England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 109
isonment to torture upon the rack, or execution upon the gibbet? If an indefinable kind of constructive treason is to be introduced and engrafted upon the Constitution, unknown to the laws of the land, and subject to the will of the President whenever an insurrection or invasion shall occur in any part of this vast country, what safety or security will be left for the liberties of the people? The constructive treasons that gave the friends of freedom so many years of toil and trouble in England, were inconsiderable compared to this. The precedents which you make will become a part of the Constitution for your successors, if sanctioned and acquiesced in by the people now. The people of Ohio are willing to cooperate zealously with you in every effort, warranted by the Constitution, to restore the Union of the States; but they cannot consent to abandon those fundamental principles of civil liberty which are essential to their existence as a free people. In their name, we ask t
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 109
ondence between President Lincoln and the committee appointed by the Ohio Democratic State Convention to ask for permission for Hon. C. L. Vallandigham to return to Ohio : See Doc. 67, page 298, ante. The letter to the President. Washington City, June 26, 1863. To His Excellency the President of the United States: The undersigned, having been appointed a committee, under the authority of the resolutions of the State Convention, held at the city of Columbus, Ohio, on the eleventh h District. George H. Pendleton, First District. W. A. Hutchins, Eleventh District. Abner L. Backus, Tenth District. J. F. Mckinney, Fourth District. F. C. Le Blond, Fifth District. Louis Schaffer, Seventeenth District. The reply. Washington, D. C., June 29 1885. Messr's. M. Birchard, David A. Houck, George Bliss. T. W. Bartley, W. J. Gordon, John O'Neill, C. A. White, V. E. Finck, Alexander Long, J. W. White, George H. Pendleton, George L. Converse, Warren P. Noble, James R. Morris,
Franklin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
orrect copy of the correspondence between President Lincoln and the committee appointed by the Ohio Democratic State Convention to ask for permission for Hon. C. L. Vallandigham to return to Ohio : See Doc. 67, page 298, ante. The letter to the President. Washington City, June 26, 1863. To His Excellency the President of the United States: The undersigned, having been appointed a committee, under the authority of the resolutions of the State Convention, held at the city of Columbus, Ohio, on the eleventh instant, to communicate with you on the subject of the arrest and banishment of Clement L. Vallandigham, most respectfully submit the following as the resolutions of that Convention, bearing upon the subject of this communication, and ask of your Excellency their earnest consideration. And they deem it proper to state that the Convention was one in which all parts of the State were represented, and one of the most respectable as to character and numbers, and one of the
Albany (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
W. Bartley, W. J. Gordon, John O'Neill, C. A. White, V. E. Finck, Alexander Long, J. W. White, George H. Pendleton, George L. Converse, Warren P. Noble, James R. Morris, W. A Hutchins, Abner L. Backus, J. F. McKinney, P. C. Le Blond, Louis Schaffer. gentlemen: The resolutions of the Ohio Democratic State Convention, which you present me, together with your introductory and closing remarks, being in position and argument mainly the same as the resolutions of the Democratic meeting at Albany, New-York, I refer you to my response to the latter as meeting most of the points in the former. This response you evidently used in preparing your remarks, and I desire no more than that it be used with accuracy. In a single reading of your remarks, I only discovered one inaccuracy in matter, which I suppose you took from that paper. It is where you say: The undersigned are unable to agree with you in the opinion you have expressed that the Constitution is different in time of insurrection or
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 109
, June 26, 1863. To His Excellency the President of the United States: The undersigned, having been appointed a committee, Ohio, not belonging to the land or naval forces of the United States, nor to the militia in actual service, by alleged militlly, but most earnestly, call upon the President of the United States to restore Clement L. Vallandigham to his home in Ohio,othing else: 1. That there is a rebellion now in the United States, the object and tendency of which is to destroy the naty, July 1, 1863. To His Excellency the President of the United States: sir: Your answer to the application of the undersigby the people, and that the powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the Statesrms, contracts, or conditions with the President of the United States to procure the release of Mr. Vallandigham. The opiniopon their own sincerity and fidelity as citizens of the United States, but also carrying with it by implication a concession
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 109
f things in this country, cannot be used as a means of restoring the Union; or that a war to subjugate a part of the States, or a war to revolutionize the social system in a part of the States, could not restore, but would inevitably result in the final destruction of both the Constitution and the Union, is he not to be allowed the right of an American citizen to appeal to the judgment of the people for a change of policy by the constitutional remedy of the ballot-box? During the war with Mexico many of the political opponents of the administration then in power thought it their duty to oppose and denounce the war, and to urge before the people of the country that it was unjust, and prosecuted for unholy purposes. With equal reason it might have been said of them that their discussions before the people were calculated to discourage enlistments, to prevent the raising of troops, and to induce desertions from the army and leave the Government without an adequate military force to ca
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 109
ission for Hon. C. L. Vallandigham to return to Ohio : See Doc. 67, page 298, ante. The lette Clement L. Vallandigham, a citizen of the State of Ohio, not belonging to the land or naval forcesult offered to the sovereignty of the people of Ohio, by whose organic law it is declared that no peidate for nomination by the Democratic party of Ohio, for the office of Governor of the State; that onal knowledge of the feelings of the people of Ohio, that the public safety will be far more endangention. I am unable to perceive an insult to Ohio in the case of Mr. Vallandigham. Quite surely,he has never made a speech before the people of Ohio in which he has not counselled submission and oude of themselves or of the Democratic party in Ohio encourages desertions, resistance to the draft, the two years in which the Democratic party of Ohio has been constrained to oppose the policy of ths a favor, but as a right, due to the people of Ohio, and with a view to avoid the possibility of co[12 more...]
J. F. Mckinney (search for this): chapter 109
se, Seventh District Warren P. Noble, Ninth District. George H. Pendleton, First District. W. A. Hutchins, Eleventh District. Abner L. Backus, Tenth District. J. F. Mckinney, Fourth District. F. C. Le Blond, Fifth District. Louis Schaffer, Seventeenth District. The reply. Washington, D. C., June 29 1885. Messr's. M. BircA. White, V. E. Finck, Alexander Long, J. W. White, George H. Pendleton, George L. Converse, Warren P. Noble, James R. Morris, W. A Hutchins, Abner L. Backus, J. F. McKinney, P. C. Le Blond, Louis Schaffer. gentlemen: The resolutions of the Ohio Democratic State Convention, which you present me, together with your introductory ris, Fifteenth District. Geo. S. Converse, Seventh District. Geo. H. Pendleton, First District. W. A. Hutchins, Eleventh District. A. L. Backus, Tenth District. J. F. Mckinney, Fourth District. J. W. White, Sixteenth District. F. C. Le Blond, Fifth District. Louis Schaffer, Seventeenth District. Warren P. Noble, Ninth District.
M. Birchard (search for this): chapter 109
restored to the enjoyment of those rights of which they believe he has been unconstitutionally deprived. We have the honor to be, respectfully yours, etc., M. Birchard, Chairman, Nineteenth District. David A. Houk, Secretary, Third District. George Bliss, Fourteenth District. T. W. Bartley, Eighth District. W. J. Gordon, Eigh Mckinney, Fourth District. F. C. Le Blond, Fifth District. Louis Schaffer, Seventeenth District. The reply. Washington, D. C., June 29 1885. Messr's. M. Birchard, David A. Houck, George Bliss. T. W. Bartley, W. J. Gordon, John O'Neill, C. A. White, V. E. Finck, Alexander Long, J. W. White, George H. Pendleton, George L. repeat the acts complained of. The undersigned, therefore, having fully discharged the duty enjoined upon them, leave the responsibility with the President. M. Birchard, Nineteenth District, Chairman. David Houk, Secretary, Third District. Geo. Bliss, Fourteenth District. T. W. Bartley, Eighth District. W. J. Gordon, Eighteent
David A. Houck (search for this): chapter 109
ict. W. E. Finck, Twelfth District. Alexander long, Second District. J. W. White, Sixteenth District. James R. Morris, Fifteenth District. George S. Converse, Seventh District Warren P. Noble, Ninth District. George H. Pendleton, First District. W. A. Hutchins, Eleventh District. Abner L. Backus, Tenth District. J. F. Mckinney, Fourth District. F. C. Le Blond, Fifth District. Louis Schaffer, Seventeenth District. The reply. Washington, D. C., June 29 1885. Messr's. M. Birchard, David A. Houck, George Bliss. T. W. Bartley, W. J. Gordon, John O'Neill, C. A. White, V. E. Finck, Alexander Long, J. W. White, George H. Pendleton, George L. Converse, Warren P. Noble, James R. Morris, W. A Hutchins, Abner L. Backus, J. F. McKinney, P. C. Le Blond, Louis Schaffer. gentlemen: The resolutions of the Ohio Democratic State Convention, which you present me, together with your introductory and closing remarks, being in position and argument mainly the same as the resolutions of the Democ
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