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Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
heir artillery. Our brave troops made many desperate charges, and were often driven back by sheer force of numbers. They as often rallied, and finally succeeded in forcing the enemy to commence to retreat, leaving many of their dead and wounded in our hands. Our losses are heavy, and among them some of our best officers. We took a large number of prisoners, three hundred and thirty-six of whom have already arrived, including two majors. Thirty prisoners also arrived at Richmond from Winchester. These were captured by the forces of General Albert G. Jenkins. Richmond Sentinel account. Richmond, June 12. The cars on yesterday evening brought down three hundred and two prisoners of war, cavalrymen and artillerymen, captured by Stuart's cavalry in the fight near Brandy Station on Tuesday. Twelve of the number were commissioned officers — including one colonel, one major, and sundry captains and lieutenants. Twenty prisoners, captured in the Valley, accompanied those
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
nd at other intermediate points, about daylight on Tuesday morning, both of their main columns pushing forward toward Brandy Station, five miles below Culpeper Court-House, with the design of getting in the rear of our forces, who were between the con three hundred and two prisoners of war, cavalrymen and artillerymen, captured by Stuart's cavalry in the fight near Brandy Station on Tuesday. Twelve of the number were commissioned officers — including one colonel, one major, and sundry captains rced our men to fall back. They gained so much ground as to capture General Stuart's headquarters, near Brandy; also Brandy Station, and, we understand, some stores there. Our men, recovering from their surprise, now rapidly came forward and threagain. The rebel press on the fight. Richmond, June 12. The more the circumstances of the late affair at Brandy Station are considered, the less pleasant do they appear. If this was an isolated case, it might be excused under the conven
Culpeper, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Rebel reports and Narratives. General Lee's despatch. Culpeper, June 9, 1863. To General S. Cooper: The enemy crossed the Rappahannock this morning at five o'clock, at the various fords from Beverly's to Kelly's, with a large force of cavalry, accompanied by infantry and artillery. After a severe contest, till five P. M., General Stuart drove them across the river. R. E. Lee. Lynchburgh Republican account. Lynchburgh, June 11. The forces engaged on our side were Generals W. H. F. Lee's, Hampton's Legion, Jones's and Robertson's brigades, with the Beauregard battery from this city, and one other company of artillery. Our total force numbered about four thousand. The enemy had, it is estimated, about ten thousand cavalry, seven regiments of infantry, and six batteries, the whole under command of General Pleasanton. The enemy commenced to cross the Rappahannock simultaneously at Beverly's and Kelly's Fords, and at other intermediate points, about daylight
Oak Shade (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
red our pickets, and thus prevented early intelligence of their movements being reported. The fight commenced at seven o'clock, and about ten o'clock our forces were all brought in position, and from that time until two o'clock the fight raged with terrific fierceness, our men gradually driving the enemy before them toward the Rappahannock bridge. About two o'clock the enemy commenced retreating up the Rappahannock, when Colonel Munford, commanding Fitz Lee's brigade, whose camp was near Oak Shade, crossed the Hazel River and attacked them in their front. The fight continued to rage until six o'clock, when the discomfited enemy effected a recrossing of the Rappahannock at Beverly's and fords adjacent. The enemy fought hand to hand for a time, but relied principally upon their cavalry, dismounted and used as infantry, and their artillery. Our brave troops made many desperate charges, and were often driven back by sheer force of numbers. They as often rallied, and finally succee
Beverly (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Rebel reports and Narratives. General Lee's despatch. Culpeper, June 9, 1863. To General S. Cooper: The enemy crossed the Rappahannock this morning at five o'clock, at the various fords from Beverly's to Kelly's, with a large force of cavalry, accompanied by infantry and artillery. After a severe contest, till five P. M., General Stuart drove them across the river. R. E. Lee. Lynchburgh Republican account. Lynchburgh, June 11. The forces engaged on our side were Geneford, commanding Fitz Lee's brigade, whose camp was near Oak Shade, crossed the Hazel River and attacked them in their front. The fight continued to rage until six o'clock, when the discomfited enemy effected a recrossing of the Rappahannock at Beverly's and fords adjacent. The enemy fought hand to hand for a time, but relied principally upon their cavalry, dismounted and used as infantry, and their artillery. Our brave troops made many desperate charges, and were often driven back by shee
Lynchburgh (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Rebel reports and Narratives. General Lee's despatch. Culpeper, June 9, 1863. To General S. Cooper: The enemy crossed the Rappahannock this morning at five o'clock, at the various fords from Beverly's to Kelly's, with a large force of cavalry, accompanied by infantry and artillery. After a severe contest, till five P. M., General Stuart drove them across the river. R. E. Lee. Lynchburgh Republican account. Lynchburgh, June 11. The forces engaged on our side were Generals W. H. F. Lee's, Hampton's Legion, Jones's and Robertson's brigades, with the Beauregard battery from this city, and one other company of artillery. Our total force numbered about four thousand. The enemy had, it is estimated, about ten thousand cavalry, seven regiments of infantry, and six batteries, the whole under command of General Pleasanton. The enemy commenced to cross the Rappahannock simultaneously at Beverly's and Kelly's Fords, and at other intermediate points, about daylight
Kelly's Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
sand. The enemy had, it is estimated, about ten thousand cavalry, seven regiments of infantry, and six batteries, the whole under command of General Pleasanton. The enemy commenced to cross the Rappahannock simultaneously at Beverly's and Kelly's Fords, and at other intermediate points, about daylight on Tuesday morning, both of their main columns pushing forward toward Brandy Station, five miles below Culpeper Court-House, with the design of getting in the rear of our forces, who were betwnd as they are believed to have taken at least as many prisoners toward the close of the day as they lost in the morning, they may be considered victors. But it is a victory over which few will exult. It resembles that other victory won at Kelly's Ford on the seventeenth of March. Both would have been well merited defeats if valor had not paid the price of conceit and carelessness. The ease with which the enemy outwitted the guard of the river on the first occasion was the prompter of Ston
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
fantry and artillery. After a severe contest, till five P. M., General Stuart drove them across the river. R. E. Lee. Lynchburgh Republican account. Lynchburgh, June 11. The forces engaged on our side were Generals W. H. F. Lee's, Hampton's Legion, Jones's and Robertson's brigades, with the Beauregard battery from this city, and one other company of artillery. Our total force numbered about four thousand. The enemy had, it is estimated, about ten thousand cavalry, seven regimen on Tuesday. Twelve of the number were commissioned officers — including one colonel, one major, and sundry captains and lieutenants. Twenty prisoners, captured in the Valley, accompanied those above named. The bodies of Colonel Hampton, of Hampton's cavalry brigade, and Colonel Williams of South-Carolina, were received by the same train, and escorted by the Virginia State Guard to the capitol. It is to be conveyed South for sepulture. The gallant Colonel was one of the slain in the batt
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
my in killed and wounded is believed to be considerably greater than ours. This is usually the case with the army that is defeated. Among our slain are Lieutenant-Colonel Hampton of General Hampton's brigade, and Colonel Saul Williams of the Second North-Carolina regiment. Colonel Butler of South-Carolina had his foot shot off, and has suffered amputation. General W. H. F. Lee received a painful but not dangerous flesh-wound in the thigh. He came down yesterday to Colonel Wickham's in Hanover. Colonel A. W. Harman of the Twelfth Virginia cavalry was wounded, but not seriously, in the neck. The forces engaged on our side were the brigades of Generals Hampton, W. H. F. Lee, and Jones. We understand that the Yankees burned Kelly's Mill. The fight, on the whole, may be said to have begun in a surprise and ended in a victory. The latter is what we are accustomed to hear of confederate soldiers; the former we trust never to hear again. The rebel press on the fight.
Kelly's Mill (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ond North-Carolina regiment. Colonel Butler of South-Carolina had his foot shot off, and has suffered amputation. General W. H. F. Lee received a painful but not dangerous flesh-wound in the thigh. He came down yesterday to Colonel Wickham's in Hanover. Colonel A. W. Harman of the Twelfth Virginia cavalry was wounded, but not seriously, in the neck. The forces engaged on our side were the brigades of Generals Hampton, W. H. F. Lee, and Jones. We understand that the Yankees burned Kelly's Mill. The fight, on the whole, may be said to have begun in a surprise and ended in a victory. The latter is what we are accustomed to hear of confederate soldiers; the former we trust never to hear again. The rebel press on the fight. Richmond, June 12. The more the circumstances of the late affair at Brandy Station are considered, the less pleasant do they appear. If this was an isolated case, it might be excused under the convenient head of accident or chance. But this mu
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