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over the Holston River. This was twenty miles from Kingston. General Shackleford was sent to London. On his approach the rebels retreated across the bridge, which they had barricaded, and fired it. Turpentine had been poured on the planks, and it was soon a mass of flames. Our troops fired across the river with artillery and musketry, and the people in the neighborhood said several rebels were killed and wounded. General Burnside left Kingston on the second and entered Knoxville on the third. The reception of our troops at this place was most gratifying. General Buckner with his rear-guard had left the day before Colonel Foster's arrival, for Chattanooga. There is reason to believe Rosecrans had in front of him, at Chattanooga, the whole force of Buckner, Bragg, and Johnston. The people about Knoxville say the flight of the rebels, when Burnside's approach was announced, was something wonderful. Their panic was immense. They had a report among them that Burnside had an arm
Knoxville the people were pointing out the hiding places of rebel stores, and were zealous in so doing. The prominent secessionists at Knoxville fled with Buckner. There are a few left who have assisted the secession blood-hounds, and the popular expression was: They must leave here or they must die. They can't live here. Intelligence was received that the rebels were prepared to make a stand at Cumberland Gap. Burnside was not afraid of their standing, but of their running, and on the fifth, despatched General Shackleford from Knoxville to cut off all means of escape. On the seventh General Burnside left Knoxville with a force of cavalry and artillery, and arrived at Shackleford's headquarters early on the morning of the ninth. General De Courcey, who had advanced upon the Gap, direct from London, Kentucky, was hemming the rebels in on the north side. The rebel force was commanded by General Frazer, of Mississippi. He had, when rumors of Burnside's movements reached Buckner,
s received that the rebels were prepared to make a stand at Cumberland Gap. Burnside was not afraid of their standing, but of their running, and on the fifth, despatched General Shackleford from Knoxville to cut off all means of escape. On the seventh General Burnside left Knoxville with a force of cavalry and artillery, and arrived at Shackleford's headquarters early on the morning of the ninth. General De Courcey, who had advanced upon the Gap, direct from London, Kentucky, was hemming the ) and there was a considerable majority in favor of giving up the Southern Confederacy and restoring the Union! The Georgians, however, were fighting men, and the regiment composed of them was the only reliable one General Frazer had. On the seventh, two days before the surrender, two companies of Shackleford's men penetrated the rebel lines, and burned the mill upon which the garrison at the Gap depended for their supply of flour. It was a hazardous and brilliant affair. When Shacklefo
Doc. 122.-the East-Tennessee campaign. Operations of General Burnside. Major W. H. Church's account. General Burnside left Camp Nelson on the sixteenth of August for East-Tennessee. He left Crab Orchard on the twenty-fourth, having completed his preparations, his columns having been in motion for several days. He reached Mount Vernon, twenty miles distant, on the same day. He left Mount Vernon on the twenty-third, and reached London, twenty-five miles. On the twenty-fourth he reached Williamsburgh, thirty miles from London. On the twenty-fifth he reached Chitwood, Tennessee, twenty-eight miles southwest of Williamsburgh, where he came up with Major-General Hartsuff, commanding the Twenty-third army corps. Major Emory here made a cavalry reconnoissance toward Jacksboro, encountered two regiments of rebel cavalry, and routed them, taking forty-five prisoners. General Burnside, with the main body of his army, left Chitwood on the twenty-eighth and reached Montgomery, the
Doc. 122.-the East-Tennessee campaign. Operations of General Burnside. Major W. H. Church's account. General Burnside left Camp Nelson on the sixteenth of August for East-Tennessee. He left Crab Orchard on the twenty-fourth, having completed his preparations, his columns having been in motion for several days. He reached Mount Vernon, twenty miles distant, on the same day. He left Mount Vernon on the twenty-third, and reached London, twenty-five miles. On the twenty-fourth he reatwenty-fourth he reached Williamsburgh, thirty miles from London. On the twenty-fifth he reached Chitwood, Tennessee, twenty-eight miles southwest of Williamsburgh, where he came up with Major-General Hartsuff, commanding the Twenty-third army corps. Major Emory here made a cavalry reconnoissance toward Jacksboro, encountered two regiments of rebel cavalry, and routed them, taking forty-five prisoners. General Burnside, with the main body of his army, left Chitwood on the twenty-eighth and reached Montgomery, th
General Burnside. Major W. H. Church's account. General Burnside left Camp Nelson on the sixteenth of August for East-Tennessee. He left Crab Orchard on the twenty-fourth, having completed his preparations, his columns having been in motion for several days. He reached Mount Vernon, twenty miles distant, on the same day. He left Mount Vernon on the twenty-third, and reached London, twenty-five miles. On the twenty-fourth he reached Williamsburgh, thirty miles from London. On the twenty-fifth he reached Chitwood, Tennessee, twenty-eight miles southwest of Williamsburgh, where he came up with Major-General Hartsuff, commanding the Twenty-third army corps. Major Emory here made a cavalry reconnoissance toward Jacksboro, encountered two regiments of rebel cavalry, and routed them, taking forty-five prisoners. General Burnside, with the main body of his army, left Chitwood on the twenty-eighth and reached Montgomery, the county-seat of Morgan County, Tennessee, forty-two miles fr
d, Tennessee, twenty-eight miles southwest of Williamsburgh, where he came up with Major-General Hartsuff, commanding the Twenty-third army corps. Major Emory here made a cavalry reconnoissance toward Jacksboro, encountered two regiments of rebel cavalry, and routed them, taking forty-five prisoners. General Burnside, with the main body of his army, left Chitwood on the twenty-eighth and reached Montgomery, the county-seat of Morgan County, Tennessee, forty-two miles from Chitwood, on the thirtieth. Here another column of infantry, under Colonel Julius White, came in, having marched from Central Kentucky, by way of Albany, Monticello, and Jamestown. Colonel Burt, commanding the cavalry advance, sent word that the rebel General Pegram was holding the gap in the mountains, near the Emery Iron-Works, with two thousand men. The position was a very strong one, and the gap was the gate to the Clinch River Valley. A battle was expected, as there was not a better place in the country to c
August 16th (search for this): chapter 124
Doc. 122.-the East-Tennessee campaign. Operations of General Burnside. Major W. H. Church's account. General Burnside left Camp Nelson on the sixteenth of August for East-Tennessee. He left Crab Orchard on the twenty-fourth, having completed his preparations, his columns having been in motion for several days. He reached Mount Vernon, twenty miles distant, on the same day. He left Mount Vernon on the twenty-third, and reached London, twenty-five miles. On the twenty-fourth he reached Williamsburgh, thirty miles from London. On the twenty-fifth he reached Chitwood, Tennessee, twenty-eight miles southwest of Williamsburgh, where he came up with Major-General Hartsuff, commanding the Twenty-third army corps. Major Emory here made a cavalry reconnoissance toward Jacksboro, encountered two regiments of rebel cavalry, and routed them, taking forty-five prisoners. General Burnside, with the main body of his army, left Chitwood on the twenty-eighth and reached Montgomery, the
September 1st (search for this): chapter 124
on-Works, with two thousand men. The position was a very strong one, and the gap was the gate to the Clinch River Valley. A battle was expected, as there was not a better place in the country to check our forces. But on the morning of the thirty-first it was discovered that the enemy had fled in the night. Emery River, nine miles east of Montgomery, General Burnside ordered Colonel Foster to march directly on Knoxville, where he arrived and took the town without opposition on the first of September. General Burnside proceeded to Kingston, where his scouts encountered the cavalry pickets of General Rosecrans, and communicated with a splendid body of cavalry of the army of the Cumberland, under Colonel Minty. Burnside's object in moving to Kingston was to make a push for the great Loudon bridge over the Holston River. This was twenty miles from Kingston. General Shackleford was sent to London. On his approach the rebels retreated across the bridge, which they had barricaded, an
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 124
Our troops fired across the river with artillery and musketry, and the people in the neighborhood said several rebels were killed and wounded. General Burnside left Kingston on the second and entered Knoxville on the third. The reception of our troops at this place was most gratifying. General Buckner with his rear-guard had left the day before Colonel Foster's arrival, for Chattanooga. There is reason to believe Rosecrans had in front of him, at Chattanooga, the whole force of Buckner, Bragg, and Johnston. The people about Knoxville say the flight of the rebels, when Burnside's approach was announced, was something wonderful. Their panic was immense. They had a report among them that Burnside had an army of from sixty to one hundred and twenty thousand men, and were of the opinion that their safety depended upon their speed. They left behind a considerable quantity of quartermaster's stores in pretty good order, and they had several valuable shops which they did not dismantl
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