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Woodstock, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
e instructions, I kept my forces well in hand in the vicinities of Berryville and Winchester, except that during the expedition of General Jones into West-Virginia, by order from your headquarters, I sent portions of them into that State. During my occupancy of Winchester, I almost continually kept out heavy cavalry scouts on the Front Royal road as far as Front Royal, and on the Strasburgh road as far as Strasburgh. My cavalry frequently drove the enemy's pickets as far up the valley as Woodstock, and I held almost undisputed possession of the valley as far as Strasburgh until about the first of June. By means of these cavalry expeditions, and information furnished me by Union citizens, I kept continually posted as to the rebel forces in the valley under Jones and Imboden, and was at no time deceived as to their numbers or movements. About the first of June the enemy became bolder, and small detachments of his cavalry were met as far down the valley as Middletown. On Friday, the
Summit Station (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
l supply of ammunition. The Thirteenth Pennsylvania cavalry was attached to the Third brigade. The forts were evacuated at the time designated, and immediately thereafter the cannon spiked, and the ammunition which could not be carried by the men thrown into the cisterns of the forts. The column proceeded through a ravine, avoiding the town of Winchester, about one mile, until it struck the Martinsburgh road. It then proceeded up the Martinsburgh road to where a road leads from it to Summit Station, about four miles and a half from Winchester; when I received a message from General Elliott that he was attacked by the enemy's skirmishers. I had heard the firing and was riding forward. The enemy was on elevated ground, in a wood east of the road and a field east of and adjoining the wood. This occurred between three and four o'clock in the morning. General Elliott immediately filed the One Hundred and Twenty-third, the One Hundred and Tenth, and One Hundred and Twenty second Ohio
Milwood (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
could have been conveyed to me from General Hooker's headquarters in five minutes; for telegraphic communication still existed between Baltimore and Winchester. On Friday night I doubled my pickets and kept out strong cavalry patrols on the leading roads, and I also sent a messenger to Colonel Mc-Reynolds at Berryville notifying him that the enemy was reported to be in considerable force in the Front Royal road. I instructed him to keep a strong party of observation in the direction of Milwood; to place his command in readiness to move at a moment's warning; if attacked by a superior force, to fall back upon Winchester by the route which he might deem most practicable, and that if his command should be needed at Winchester he would be notified by four discharges from the large guns at the main fort at Winchester. The whole forces under my command at this time were: First brigade, Brigadier-General Elliott commanding: One Hundred and Tenth regiment O. V. I., Col. Keifer; One Hu
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
e valley of the Shenandoah, from Staunton to Strasburgh, was occupied by the rebel General Jones, wi Royal, and on the Strasburgh road as far as Strasburgh. My cavalry frequently drove the enemy's pifrom all apprehensions of an attack from the Strasburgh road. It is now known that no portion of Leediately sent forward on the Front Royal and Strasburgh roads forces to observe and report the force and act as skirmishers. The force on the Strasburgh road consisted of the One Hundred and Tenth dge the creek and a millrace wind across the Strasburgh road, and from thence in a northern directio the ridge above described, proceeded up the Strasburgh road to within a short distance of Kearnstowliott, with a portion of his brigade, on the Strasburgh road. The remainder of my forces were in thuth, east, and west, and which commanded the Strasburgh road, from which they were dislodged by two ot cavalry he can rely upon, to scout beyond Strasburgh. What are your facilities for transportatio[8 more...]
Thornton Gap (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
. Lee's army. It was supposed that the force on the Front Royal road could not be other than the enemy which we had faced during the occupancy of Winchester, or that the anticipated cavalry raid of Gen. Stuart was in progress, against either or both of which combined I could have held my position. I deemed it impossible that Lee's army, with its immense artillery and baggage trains, could have escaped from the army of the Potomac and crossed the Blue Ridge through Ashby's, Chester, and Thornton gaps in concentric columns. The movement must have occupied five or six days, and notice of its being in progress could have been conveyed to me from General Hooker's headquarters in five minutes; for telegraphic communication still existed between Baltimore and Winchester. On Friday night I doubled my pickets and kept out strong cavalry patrols on the leading roads, and I also sent a messenger to Colonel Mc-Reynolds at Berryville notifying him that the enemy was reported to be in conside
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
t enable me to scout beyond the Blue Ridge. That army was faced, however, by the army of the Potomac, between the headquarters of which and my own, by way of Washington, a continuous line of telegraphic communication existed. I believed that Lee could not move his large army with its immense artillery and baggage trains, and ppublic. I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant, R. H. Milroy, Major-General U. S. V. John Jolliffe, Fred. P. Stanton, Counsel. Washington City, D. C., Sept. 10, 1863. Appendix. Major-General Milroy requests the Court to summon, in his behalf, Major-General Joseph Hooker, who, at the time of tD. C., Sept. 10, 1863. Appendix. Major-General Milroy requests the Court to summon, in his behalf, Major-General Joseph Hooker, who, at the time of the evacuation of Winchester, was in command of the army of the Potomac. The facts expected to be proved by this witness are: First, That he communicated information of the enemy's movements toward the valley of Virginia as early as the twenty-eighth May last to the General-in-chief, and suggested the propriety of sending General
Cedarville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
clock in the evening, and it relieved me from all apprehensions of an attack from the Strasburgh road. It is now known that no portion of Lee's army approached Winchester from that direction. The reconnaissance of the Front Royal road was abortive. The expedition consisted of the Twelfth Pennsylvania cavalry, about four hundred strong, under command of Lieut.-Col. Moss. It returned to Winchester about three o'clock in the afternoon of Friday. Its commanding officer reported, that at Cedarville, a place twelve miles from Winchester, he had encountered a large force of the enemy, composed of cavalry, infantry, and artillery. It did not appear, however, that he had placed himself in a position to ascertain the number or character of the force which he had encountered, or exercised the usual and necessary efforts to obtain that essential information. Officers of his command and reliable scouts, who were present, gave contradictory reports. This report was discredited by myself
Smithfield, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
t was impossible to unite them. I proceeded with the One Hundred and Tenth and One Hundred and Twenty-second Ohio volunteer infantry regiments, and fragments of other regiments which followed after them. This portion of the command, by way of Smithfield, arrived at Harper's Ferry late in the afternoon of Monday. I was not pursued. The column that proceeded in the direction of Bath crossed the Potomac at Hancock, and subsequently massed at Bloody Run, in Bedford County, Pa., two thousand sevebrigade commanded by Colonel McReynolds, consisting of the Sixth Maryland regiment, Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania, First New-York cavalry, and one battery, immediately fell back toward Winchester, as ordered by General Milroy, proceeding by way of Smithfield and Martinsburgh road. I was placed with my section, supported by part of the Sixth Maryland infantry and the cavalry, in one of the fortifications on the south side, which had been erected by Captain Alexander, and was fortunate enough to h
Harrisburgh (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
army of the Potomac. The facts expected to be proved by this witness are: First, That he communicated information of the enemy's movements toward the valley of Virginia as early as the twenty-eighth May last to the General-in-chief, and suggested the propriety of sending General Stahl's cavalry to that valley. Secondly, The value and importance of the check given to the enemy by the holding of Winchester during the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth of June, and its effect in saving Harrisburgh, and probably other important cities of the Union. It is believed that the testimony will clearly show that the aforesaid holding of Winchester was of far greater value than the amount of any losses incurred in the defence and evacuation of that post. R. H. Milroy, Major-General U. S. V. August 22, 1863. Indorsed: The Court does not feel authorized by the order under which it is acting to enter into the investigation suggested by the within communication. Robert N. Scott, Captain
Bloody Run, Bedford County, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
tion of the command, by way of Smithfield, arrived at Harper's Ferry late in the afternoon of Monday. I was not pursued. The column that proceeded in the direction of Bath crossed the Potomac at Hancock, and subsequently massed at Bloody Run, in Bedford County, Pa., two thousand seven hundred strong. Having no report from Col. McReynolds, I am unable to state the operations of his brigade on Monday morning. That officer arrived at Harper's Ferry about twelve M. on Monday, unaccompanied by ah he led in the last charge. The force which we encountered on Monday morning in our front was Johnson's division of Ewell's corps, from eight to ten thousand strong. The whole number of my division which have reported at Harper's Ferry and Bloody Run and other places exceeds five thousand. The stragglers scattered through the country are perhaps a thousand. My loss in killed and wounded cannot be large. It is not my object at this time to bestow praise or cast censure, but I feel it to b
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