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Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
tioned the Third brigade of my division, consisting of the Sixth regiment Maryland volunteer infantry, Sixty-seventh regiment Pennsylvania volunteer infantry, First regiment New-York volunteer cavalry, and the Baltimore battery, at Berryville, Colonel McReynolds, of the First New-York cavalry, commanding. My instructions to Col. McReynolds were to keep open our communication with Harper's Ferry, and to watch the passes of the Blue Ridge (Snicker's and Ashby's Gaps) and the fords of the Shenandoah River known as Snicker's and Berry's. To this end he was to cause to be diligently scouted, the country between him and those localities, and as far south as Millwood. I was expressly instructed to undertake no offensive operations in force. Acting in accordance with these instructions, I kept my forces well in hand in the vicinities of Berryville and Winchester, except that during the expedition of General Jones into West-Virginia, by order from your headquarters, I sent portions of them i
Doherty (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ut were driven off by our infantry pickets, which were well protected and directed to remain at their posts and act as skirmishers. The force on the Strasburgh road consisted of the One Hundred and Tenth and One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio and Twelfth Virginia infantry, and Thirteenth Pennsylvania volunteer cavalry, and Carlin's battery, Brig.-Gen. Elliott commanding. A little to the west and adjoining Winchester is a high ridge, which extends from the town south for over a mile to Mill Creek, which is known as Applepie Ridge. Around the southern terminus of this ridge the creek and a millrace wind across the Strasburgh road, and from thence in a northern direction across the Front Royal road, and north of that road to the Hollingsworth mills, where the race terminates and the creek takes an abrupt eastern course. The whole length of the race is about two miles. The creek and race combined afford a strong protection against cavalry, and for that reason, and the additional one
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
nemy never fired a single cannon during the forenoon, and not even till late in the afternoon. Every one was in suspense all day. That this dread silence meant something, all deeply felt, but what was the strategy progressing none seemed able to discover. One sharp, discerning glance then would have done more harm to the enemy than the fire of a whole brigade. One sharp eye then would have been of more value than a battery. But alas for us I no such eye was there so to glance for us. The Ohio regiments have hardly been mentioned in connection with the skirmishing in front. The One Hundred and Twenty-second, One Hundred and Twenty-third, and One Hundred and Tenth, all took a large share, indeed, the principal part in the fighting of Saturday and Sunday. These noble regiments manoeuvred from morning till night, during two successive days, driving the enemy at the point of the bayonet out of their rifle-pits, and from behind stone-fences. It was as close hand-to-hand work as cou
Middletown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
e enemy became bolder, and small detachments of his cavalry were met as far down the valley as Middletown. On Friday, the twelfth day of June, for the purpose of ascertaining whether there had been ain supporting distance of the infantry and artillery, until it had arrived within two miles of Middletown, at which place a. messenger from Major Kerwin, who was in command of the cavalry, announced terior force of cavalry of the enemy had been discovered in line of battle immediately north of Middletown. The infantry and artillery were immediately concealed, the former in a dense grove to the riour infantry, the enemy retreated precipitately, followed by our cavalry, which pursued beyond Middletown. In this affair the enemy lost fifty (as has since been ascertained) in killed and wounded,of artillery, had a splendid little skirmish with some four hundred rebel cavalry this side of Middletown, at the same time. The Thirteenth skirmished with the rebels a short time, and drew them into
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
hio did take some part in the fight. The One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio had three companies completely destroyed; while the other three Ohio regiments took the most conspicuous places in the fight. J. M. D. Letter to the President of the United States, Explanatory of the Evidence before the Court of Inquiry relative to the Evacuation of Winchester, Va., by the Command of Major-General R. H. Milroy. To His Excellency Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States: sir: Under SpeciaUnited States: sir: Under Special Order No. 346, from the War Department, a court of inquiry was detailed, by your authority, to inquire into the facts and circumstances connected with the recent evacuation of Winchester. This order was subsequently so amended as to make it the duty of the court to report the facts without expressing any opinion upon them. As I was in command of the forces which evacuated Winchester, my reputation and usefulness may be affected by the result of this investigation. Right and justice, ther
Cumberland County (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
arefully watched the accounts written by different correspondents thus far, and am utterly surprised at the vagueness of some, the falsity of others, and the imperfection of all. The battles of Winchester were of no small moment, deciding as they did the fate of the Great Valley, as well as the fate of Western Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. Could Winchester and neighboring towns have still been held in spite of the desperate courage and efforts of the enemy, Martinsburgh and Cumberland, Pennsylvania and Maryland, the railroads, canals, and public buildings would have been likewise secure. How immense the stakes we were playing for at Winchester! Then it is important as a matter of public interest and historic record that the true history of the whole matter be published. The skirmishing in front of our works opened the ball on Friday evening, June twelfth. Saturday morning it was resumed, and kept up hotly all day, the enemy still showing themselves, in small force only, in
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
own that no portion of Lee's army approached Winchester from that direction. The reconnaissance otances the whole command should be united at Winchester, I gave Colonel McReynolds the concerted sign to the instructions under which I occupied Winchester. They were not materially changed from thosozen and wounded over thirty. We arrived in Winchester at night unmolested, and camped in the star of Inquiry relative to the Evacuation of Winchester, Va., by the Command of Major-General R. H. Mial given in the morning, was on the march to Winchester, and reached that place at ten o'clock at nito defend the act of finally retreating from Winchester, although I had no orders to do so. It is nored brave and effective men who started from Winchester, upward of six thousand have been ascertaine bore a conspicuous part in the retreat from Winchester, as well as others who could throw light on with peremptory orders for the evacuation of Winchester. R. H. Milroy, Major-General U. S. Vols. Se[64 more...]
P. T. Washburn (search for this): chapter 13
liott commanding: One Hundred and Tenth regiment O. V. I., Col. Keifer; One Hundred and Sixteenth regiment O. V. I., Colonel Washburn; One Hundred and Twenty-second regiment O. V. I., Col. Ball; One Hundred and Twenty-third regiment O. V. I., Col. Wiand Twenty-second Ohio volunteer infantry on my left, to diligently carry these instructions. They were conveyed to Colonel Washburn, commanding the One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio volunteer infantry; Col. Klunk, commanding the Twelfth Virginia volunlunteer infantry and Eighth Pennsylvania to go to the support of our battery, (meaning the one just taken,) and when Colonel Washburn told the officer who brought the order that the fort was taken, Go anyhow! was the answer, and we started, right acder, but with heavy loss. Why, the whole three regiments are not now as large as any one of them before the fight. Colonel Washburn, of the One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio, deserves all credit for the good order with which he brought off his regimen
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 13
eenth Ohio came through as they should. Thus it will be seen that Ohio did take some part in the fight. The One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio had three companies completely destroyed; while the other three Ohio regiments took the most conspicuous places in the fight. J. M. D. Letter to the President of the United States, Explanatory of the Evidence before the Court of Inquiry relative to the Evacuation of Winchester, Va., by the Command of Major-General R. H. Milroy. To His Excellency Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States: sir: Under Special Order No. 346, from the War Department, a court of inquiry was detailed, by your authority, to inquire into the facts and circumstances connected with the recent evacuation of Winchester. This order was subsequently so amended as to make it the duty of the court to report the facts without expressing any opinion upon them. As I was in command of the forces which evacuated Winchester, my reputation and usefulness may be affe
ral Elliott commanding: One Hundred and Tenth regiment O. V. I., Col. Keifer; One Hundred and Sixteenth regiment O. V. I., Colonel Washburn; when the One Hundred and Tenth regiment Ohio volunteer infantry, Col. Keifer, and One Hundred and Twenty-third regiment Ohio volunteer infantunteer infantry, and battery L, Fifth regiment artillery, under Colonel Keifer. The report of Captain Morgan relieved me from all apprehensio a column at least ten thousand strong upon the outwork held by Colonel Keifer, which, after a stubborn resistance, he carried. This outwork my, driving him from the position and affording a protection to Colonel Keifer's command, under which it retreated, with small loss, to the mamy was posted. He then advanced the One Hundred and Tenth Ohio, Col. Keifer, into the woods to feel of the enemy. This regiment soon becameght flank fell into disorder and recoiled. During this contest Colonel Keifer especially distinguished himself by the display of the qualitie
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