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Hancock, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
d. The retreat was now in full progress, the two columns' by different routes, and it was impossible to unite them. I proceeded with the One Hundred and Tenth and One Hundred and Twenty-second Ohio volunteer infantry regiments, and fragments of other regiments which followed after them. This portion of the command, by way of Smithfield, arrived at Harper's Ferry late in the afternoon of Monday. I was not pursued. The column that proceeded in the direction of Bath crossed the Potomac at Hancock, and subsequently massed at Bloody Run, in Bedford County, Pa., two thousand seven hundred strong. Having no report from Col. McReynolds, I am unable to state the operations of his brigade on Monday morning. That officer arrived at Harper's Ferry about twelve M. on Monday, unaccompanied by any considerable portion of his command. The Sixth Maryland infantry regiment, attached to his brigade, arrived at that place Monday evening, almost intact. His other infantry regiment, the Sixty-s
Pughtown (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
. Early on Sunday morning I ordered Captain Morgan, of the Twelfth Pennsylvania cavalry, with a detachment of two companies of that regiment, to proceed out the Pughtown road as far as Pughtown, if practicable, thence across to the Romney road, and by that road back to the forts. I instructed him to carefully observe the disposiPughtown, if practicable, thence across to the Romney road, and by that road back to the forts. I instructed him to carefully observe the disposition and forces of the enemy, if any, in that direction. That officer returned with his command to the forts about two o'clock P. M., and reported that he had made the round indicated without meeting or detecting any traces of an enemy in that direction. Immediately west of and parallel with the ridge on which the main fortificaould not be successfully defended by the limited means at my command against such an army as surrounded me. Six principal roads, known in the army as the Romney, Pughtown, Martinsburgh, Berryville, Front Royal, and Strasburgh roads, lead into the town. The names of these roads indicate their courses. They are all intersected and
Romney (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
of his brigade, Carlin's battery, and the Twelfth Virginia volunteer infantry, took position on the ridge above described, about a quarter of a mile south of the Romney road. He had frequent and sometimes severe skirmishes. The enemy did not, however, at any time appear before him in force. In consequence of the overwhelmingeakest portion of his lines. My belief was superinduced by the manoeuvres of the enemy on Saturday, and by the grounds that the real attack would come from the Romney road. Early on Sunday morning I ordered Captain Morgan, of the Twelfth Pennsylvania cavalry, with a detachment of two companies of that regiment, to proceed out the Pughtown road as far as Pughtown, if practicable, thence across to the Romney road, and by that road back to the forts. I instructed him to carefully observe the disposition and forces of the enemy, if any, in that direction. That officer returned with his command to the forts about two o'clock P. M., and reported that he ha
Berkeley Springs (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
r infantry; Major Adams, commanding First New-York cavalry; and Major Titus, commanding Twelfth Pennsylvania cavalry. These forces immediately marched, but instead of taking the road indicated, took a road which leads to the left through Bath, in Morgan County. They were followed by considerable bodies of the Eighteenth Connecticut and Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania, and some stragglers from the One Hundred and Twenty-third, One Hundred and Tenth, and One Hundred and Twenty-second Ohio volunteer egiments, and fragments of other regiments which followed after them. This portion of the command, by way of Smithfield, arrived at Harper's Ferry late in the afternoon of Monday. I was not pursued. The column that proceeded in the direction of Bath crossed the Potomac at Hancock, and subsequently massed at Bloody Run, in Bedford County, Pa., two thousand seven hundred strong. Having no report from Col. McReynolds, I am unable to state the operations of his brigade on Monday morning. That
Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ville, and were signalled to return to Winchester, Saturday morning. They succeeded in reaching us late Saturday evening. By this time fighting had commenced at Bunker Hill, eleven miles north-east of Winchester, on the Martinsburgh road. Here Major W. T. Morris was commanding detachments from the One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio Vgnorance of some, not a single word has before been written concerning these almost Spartan heroes. By Sunday morning the forces had arrived from Berryville, Bunker Hill, and intermediate points. They had all to fight their way through to Winchester. The dark woods in the direction of Strasburgh and Front Royal were turning gr my forces would have been destroyed or captured in detail. The enemy had followed Colonel McReynolds in force, and on the same day had attached our forces at Bunker's Hill, on the Martinsburgh road. My line of communication with Major-General Schenck was not cut until some time on Saturday evening. Down to that moment he could
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
The battles of Winchester were of no small moment, deciding as they did the fate of the Great Valley, as well as the fate of Western Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. Could Winchester and neighboring towns have still been held in spite of the desperate courage and efforts of the enemy, Martinsburgh and Cumberland, Pennsylvania and Maryland, the railroads, canals, and public buildings would have been likewise secure. How immense the stakes we were playing for at Winchester! Then it is important as a matter of public interest and historic record that the true history of the whole matter be published. The skirmishing in front of our works opened the gagement there, gave us the information we could not otherwise have obtained, developed the plans and purposes of the enemy, checked and delayed his advance into Maryland for three days, and by these means enabled the army of the Potomac to follow with timely resistance, and to prevent the loss of millions of property, which would
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ences. It was as close hand-to-hand work as could be, sometimes skirmisher to skirmisher, and at others two whole brigades driving like two mad streams together. Ohio lost severely in men in all the fights in front, but she gained new lustre and renown for her already glorious history. Sunday evening, at half-past 4 o'clock, ths and majors straggling hither and thither, the whole field and staff of the One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio came through as they should. Thus it will be seen that Ohio did take some part in the fight. The One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio had three companies completely destroyed; while the other three Ohio regiments took the most cOhio regiments took the most conspicuous places in the fight. J. M. D. Letter to the President of the United States, Explanatory of the Evidence before the Court of Inquiry relative to the Evacuation of Winchester, Va., by the Command of Major-General R. H. Milroy. To His Excellency Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States: sir: Under Specia
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
o give a detailed report. A sense of duty to myself and to the officers and soldiers which I had the honor to command requires that I should submit some general statements. I occupied Winchester with my command on the twenty-fifth of December last, and continued in its occupancy until Monday morning, the fifteenth instant, when, for reasons which will appear in the sequel of this report, I was compelled to evacuate it. When I first occupied Winchester, the valley of the Shenandoah, from Staunton to Strasburgh, was occupied by the rebel General Jones, with a force variously estimated at from five to six thousand men, and constituted principally of cavalry. Imboden at the same time occupied the Cacapon Valley with a force composed of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, estimated at one thousand five hundred men. These were the only forces by which I was in danger of being assailed, unless by a force from Lee's army, which it was supposed would be prevented from hostile demonstrations
Berryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
nteer cavalry, and the Baltimore battery, at Berryville, Colonel McReynolds, of the First New-York c my forces well in hand in the vicinities of Berryville and Winchester, except that during the expedo sent a messenger to Colonel Mc-Reynolds at Berryville notifying him that the enemy was reported tolling, surrounded by dense shrubbery, on the Berryville road, about half a mile from Winchester. Ou army as the Romney, Pughtown, Martinsburgh, Berryville, Front Royal, and Strasburgh roads, lead ints were reported by our scouts as marching on Berryville. The brigade commanded by Colonel McReynoldin front. A part of our forces were then at Berryville, and were signalled to return to Winchester,y Sunday morning the forces had arrived from Berryville, Bunker Hill, and intermediate points. Theypear in the valley. Colonel McReynolds left Berryville on the morning of the thirteenth, and, by a the emergency. Colonel McReynolds found the Berryville road occupied by the enemy on Saturday, so t
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Doc. 11.-evacuation of Winchester. Major-General Milroy's report. Baltimore, June 30, 1863. Colonel: I have been compelled by the exigencies of public quarters in five minutes; for telegraphic communication still existed between Baltimore and Winchester. On Friday night I doubled my pickets and kept out strong c: In accordance with orders from Halleck, received from headquarters, at Baltimore, to-day, you will immediately take steps to remove your command from Winchest Early on Friday morning, the twelfth of June, I received this telegram: Baltimore, June 12, one o'clock A. M., 1863. Major-General R. H. Milroy: Lieutenant- Chief of Staff, Eighth A. C. Lieutenant H. E. Alexander's account. Baltimore, June 18, 1863. As there have been conflicting accounts relative to the teter, without timely notice of it being given to me through General Schenck at Baltimore. It is in proof that my small force of cavalry was most actively and industr
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