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Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
Colonel Wood for their successful management. Johnston's army, when last heard from, was in full retreat toward Meridian. His troops were scattered through the country, swearing they would never bear arms again. The proud and haughty State of Mississippi has been humbled, and is now bowing under the Stars and Stripes, pleading for mercy. The people everywhere feel that the Confederacy is a failure, that Mississippi is out of the contest, and they are ready for any thing that will relieve Mississippi is out of the contest, and they are ready for any thing that will relieve them from the iron rule of the tyrannical leaders at Richmond. Hundreds and thousands of citizens want to go North, and all are going who can procure transportation for their families. Many of the slaveholders throughout the country have sacrificed every thing on their plantations, and gone with their negroes to Alabama. They sacrifice every thing but their negroes. They left in such haste that in many instances the wearing apparel of the family has been much of it left behind. Stock, crop
Canton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
Doc. 138.-Colonel Bussy's expedition. Jackson, Miss., July 20, 1863. On the sixteenth instant, Colonel Bussy, Chief of Cavalry of General Sherman's army, with one thousand of his cavalry, and Wood's brigade of Steele's division, started for Canton, Miss. It was known that Jackson's cavalry division, numbering about four thousand men, had crossed the river, and was supposed to be in the neighborhood of Canton. Our forces reached Grant's Mill, ten miles north of Jackson, at nine o'clock A. M., where the enemy made his appearance and fired on our advance. Colonel Wood sent forward a party of infantry, drove the enemy from their position on the bank of the river, and destroyed the ferry-boat. Our forces proceeded on to Calhoun Station, on the New-Orleans and Jackson Railroad, where Colonel Bussy burned two locomotives, twenty-five cars, the depot building, and a large quantity of cotton, while Colonel Wood's forces tore up and burned two miles of the railroad track. Thi
Newsome Springs (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
troops were in motion, and when within two miles of Canton, Jackson's forces were discovered in position ready to meet an attack. He occupied the west side of Bear Creek, and his line extended from the creek along the road, and circling round to the woods on our left. Colonel Stephens, with the Second Wisconsin cavalry, was depeenth Missouri and Thirty-first Iowa, were gaining ground to the front. The enemy now fell back along the whole line, and disappeared behind the thick brush on Bear Creek. Colonel Woods moved his forces into the thick brush, where the enemy, from his cover, opened a severe fire, which was returned by our skirmishers. The enemy'sble to discover his position. He kept up a vigorous shelling, which, however, did no injury. Colonel Wood finally dislodged the enemy, reached the bridge over Bear Creek, which the enemy had destroyed, and soon erected a crossing sufficient to cross our forces, when it was discovered the enemy were in full retreat. His loss is
Osage, Mitchell County, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
nslow, and the Third Iowa cavalry, Major Scott, were formed in line on the left, the Fifth Illinois cavalry, Major Seley, on the right of the infantry. This disposition had hardly been made before the enemy came pouring out of the woods with the evident intention of charging the train. Our artillery opened a fire while the skirmishers from the Seventh-sixth Ohio pushed forward, causing the enemy to fall back in great disorder. It was impossible to pursue, as the fences are heavy hedges of Osage orange, which makes it difficult to get man or beast through them. While these operations were going on under the immediate direction of Colonel Bussy, Colonel Woods, with the Third, Thirteenth, and Seventeenth Missouri and Thirty-first Iowa, were gaining ground to the front. The enemy now fell back along the whole line, and disappeared behind the thick brush on Bear Creek. Colonel Woods moved his forces into the thick brush, where the enemy, from his cover, opened a severe fire, which w
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 140
er brigade. They claimed to have four to five thousand men, with two pieces of artillery. General Jackson commanded, with General Whitfield, of Kansas notoriety, commanding one brigade, General Crosby and General Adams the others. The whole expedition was a most brilliant success. The railroad has been completely destroyed for forty miles. It cannot be repaired while the war lasts, and therefore cannot be used to transport supplies to support an army within striking distance of the Mississippi River. The expedition is an important one connected with the war in the South, and reflects great credit upon Colonel Bussy and Colonel Wood for their successful management. Johnston's army, when last heard from, was in full retreat toward Meridian. His troops were scattered through the country, swearing they would never bear arms again. The proud and haughty State of Mississippi has been humbled, and is now bowing under the Stars and Stripes, pleading for mercy. The people everywh
Way's Bluff (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
ir contents, five locomotives, fifty cars, and one hundred thousand feet of lumber belonging to the Confederacy. Jackson burned the railroad depot and six hundred bales of cotton as he was leaving the town. Not a dollar's worth of public property was left in Canton. Colonel Bussy also sent a force of cavalry and destroyed a pontoon-bridge over Pearl River. He also burned the railroad bridge over Big Black, twenty miles north of Canton, with one mile of trestle work, and the depot at Ways Bluff. The expedition returned to Jackson last night, having lost about twenty men. They captured seventy--two prisoners, and lost none. Our whole force did not exceed two thousand men. Several regiments were represented, but they were very small ones, the Fifty-first Iowa numbering less than sixty men. The enemy's force consisted of two brigades, and two regiments of another brigade. They claimed to have four to five thousand men, with two pieces of artillery. General Jackson commanded, wit
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
on was a most brilliant success. The railroad has been completely destroyed for forty miles. It cannot be repaired while the war lasts, and therefore cannot be used to transport supplies to support an army within striking distance of the Mississippi River. The expedition is an important one connected with the war in the South, and reflects great credit upon Colonel Bussy and Colonel Wood for their successful management. Johnston's army, when last heard from, was in full retreat toward Meridian. His troops were scattered through the country, swearing they would never bear arms again. The proud and haughty State of Mississippi has been humbled, and is now bowing under the Stars and Stripes, pleading for mercy. The people everywhere feel that the Confederacy is a failure, that Mississippi is out of the contest, and they are ready for any thing that will relieve them from the iron rule of the tyrannical leaders at Richmond. Hundreds and thousands of citizens want to go North, a
Grant's Mill (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
Doc. 138.-Colonel Bussy's expedition. Jackson, Miss., July 20, 1863. On the sixteenth instant, Colonel Bussy, Chief of Cavalry of General Sherman's army, with one thousand of his cavalry, and Wood's brigade of Steele's division, started for Canton, Miss. It was known that Jackson's cavalry division, numbering about four thousand men, had crossed the river, and was supposed to be in the neighborhood of Canton. Our forces reached Grant's Mill, ten miles north of Jackson, at nine o'clock A. M., where the enemy made his appearance and fired on our advance. Colonel Wood sent forward a party of infantry, drove the enemy from their position on the bank of the river, and destroyed the ferry-boat. Our forces proceeded on to Calhoun Station, on the New-Orleans and Jackson Railroad, where Colonel Bussy burned two locomotives, twenty-five cars, the depot building, and a large quantity of cotton, while Colonel Wood's forces tore up and burned two miles of the railroad track. This
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
Doc. 138.-Colonel Bussy's expedition. Jackson, Miss., July 20, 1863. On the sixteenth instant, Colonel Bussy, Chief of Cavalry of General Sherman's army, wd's brigade of Steele's division, started for Canton, Miss. It was known that Jackson's cavalry division, numbering about four thousand men, had crossed the river, eighborhood of Canton. Our forces reached Grant's Mill, ten miles north of Jackson, at nine o'clock A. M., where the enemy made his appearance and fired on our a an early hour the troops were in motion, and when within two miles of Canton, Jackson's forces were discovered in position ready to meet an attack. He occupied thelonel Bussy also sent a force of cavalry and destroyed a pontoon-bridge over Pearl River. He also burned the railroad bridge over Big Black, twenty miles north of mile of trestle work, and the depot at Ways Bluff. The expedition returned to Jackson last night, having lost about twenty men. They captured seventy--two prisoners
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 140
ipes, pleading for mercy. The people everywhere feel that the Confederacy is a failure, that Mississippi is out of the contest, and they are ready for any thing that will relieve them from the iron rule of the tyrannical leaders at Richmond. Hundreds and thousands of citizens want to go North, and all are going who can procure transportation for their families. Many of the slaveholders throughout the country have sacrificed every thing on their plantations, and gone with their negroes to Alabama. They sacrifice every thing but their negroes. They left in such haste that in many instances the wearing apparel of the family has been much of it left behind. Stock, crops, and every comfort of home has been sacrificed. The wife and family are made to suffer all these privations for the bare chance of saving the nigger. General Steele has not yet returned from the pursuit of the enemy. Our whole army will, no doubt, return to Vicksburgh immediately on his return. This army has be
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