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Jack's Creek, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 152
ad done them but little. I then continued my course about four miles, and bivouacked for the night. On the morning of the fourth we mounted, and scouted the country in all directions until evening, when I started for Smith's Mill, on White Oak Creek, where we spent the night. On the morning of the fifth we again mounted, and went about seven miles in a northwestern direction, when we met a portion of Captain Stinnett's guerrillas and had a right sharp fight, capturing his first lieutenant, first sergeant, and fifteen men. We had the fight on the north fork of White Oak Creek, about eight miles southeast of Jack's Creek. I then concluded to make my way back to Lagrange, which I did, arriving in camp on the seventh with my seventeen prisoners, neither myself nor any of my little squad having received a scratch. I respectfully submit the above report, and also the seventeen greybacks, to your paternal care. Respectfully, Wm. J. Smith, First Lieutenant Co. C. Commanding Squad.
Whiteoak Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 152
Corinth. Leaving Colonel Hatch at Lexington, I started to Corinth, and on the morning of the third I met the First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being wellvouacked for the night. On the morning of the fourth we mounted, and scouted the country in all directions until evening, when I started for Smith's Mill, on White Oak Creek, where we spent the night. On the morning of the fifth we again mounted, and went about seven miles in a northwestern direction, when we met a portion of Captain Stinnett's guerrillas and had a right sharp fight, capturing his first lieutenant, first sergeant, and fifteen men. We had the fight on the north fork of White Oak Creek, about eight miles southeast of Jack's Creek. I then concluded to make my way back to Lagrange, which I did, arriving in camp on the seventh with my sevente
La Grange (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 152
Doc. 149.-reconnoissance from Lagrange. Lieutenant Smith's report. Lagrange, Tenn., August 9. Colonel Hurst: I beg leave to make the following report of a scout of which I had command, by order of Colonel Hatch: On the second instant Colonel Hatch ordered me, with sixteen men, to take a despatch to General Dodge aLagrange, Tenn., August 9. Colonel Hurst: I beg leave to make the following report of a scout of which I had command, by order of Colonel Hatch: On the second instant Colonel Hatch ordered me, with sixteen men, to take a despatch to General Dodge at Corinth. Leaving Colonel Hatch at Lexington, I started to Corinth, and on the morning of the third I met the First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being wt, and fifteen men. We had the fight on the north fork of White Oak Creek, about eight miles southeast of Jack's Creek. I then concluded to make my way back to Lagrange, which I did, arriving in camp on the seventh with my seventeen prisoners, neither myself nor any of my little squad having received a scratch. I respectfully
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 152
th sixteen men, to take a despatch to General Dodge at Corinth. Leaving Colonel Hatch at Lexington, I started to Corinth, and on the morning of the third I met the First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being well acquainted with that portion, of country. We then proceeded in the direction of Swallow Bluff, on the Tennessee River, meeting with no opposition. Near Swallow Bluff we separated, the Alabama cavalry moving up the river. After we parted I had a fight with some of Colonel Biffle's men across the river, but do not know the amount of damage done. We saw some of the rebels fall from their horses--three, if no more — but do not know whether they were shot dead or not. The rebels soon left the bank — yea, fled incontinently. I then turned north-west, and after marching about ten miles I met a squad of re
Smith's Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 152
ad or not. The rebels soon left the bank — yea, fled incontinently. I then turned north-west, and after marching about ten miles I met a squad of rebels and exchanged several shots with them, when, as usual, the rebels fled. We received no damage, and we presumed that we had done them but little. I then continued my course about four miles, and bivouacked for the night. On the morning of the fourth we mounted, and scouted the country in all directions until evening, when I started for Smith's Mill, on White Oak Creek, where we spent the night. On the morning of the fifth we again mounted, and went about seven miles in a northwestern direction, when we met a portion of Captain Stinnett's guerrillas and had a right sharp fight, capturing his first lieutenant, first sergeant, and fifteen men. We had the fight on the north fork of White Oak Creek, about eight miles southeast of Jack's Creek. I then concluded to make my way back to Lagrange, which I did, arriving in camp on the seven
enant Smith's report. Lagrange, Tenn., August 9. Colonel Hurst: I beg leave to make the following report of a scout of which I had command, by order of Colonel Hatch: On the second instant Colonel Hatch ordered me, with sixteen men, to take a despatch to General Dodge at Corinth. Leaving Colonel Hatch at Lexington, I stColonel Hatch ordered me, with sixteen men, to take a despatch to General Dodge at Corinth. Leaving Colonel Hatch at Lexington, I started to Corinth, and on the morning of the third I met the First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being well acquainted with that portion, of country. We theColonel Hatch at Lexington, I started to Corinth, and on the morning of the third I met the First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being well acquainted with that portion, of country. We then proceeded in the direction of Swallow Bluff, on the Tennessee River, meeting with no opposition. Near Swallow Bluff we separated, the Alabama cavalry moving up the river. After we parted I had a fight with some of Colonel Biffle's men across the river, but do not know the amount of damage done. We saw some of the rebels fall f
Doc. 149.-reconnoissance from Lagrange. Lieutenant Smith's report. Lagrange, Tenn., August 9. Colonel Hurst: I beg leave to make the following report of a scout of which I had command, by order of Colonel Hatch: On the second instant Colonel Hatch ordered me, with sixteen men, to take a despatch to General Dodge at Corinth. Leaving Colonel Hatch at Lexington, I started to Corinth, and on the morning of the third I met the First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being well acquainted with that portion, of country. We then proceeded in the direction of Swallow Bluff, on the Tennessee River, meeting with no opposition. Near Swallow Bluff we separated, the Alabama cavalry moving up the river. After we parted I had a fight with some of Colonel Biffle's men across the river, but do not know the amoun
e First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being well acquainted with that portion, of country. We then proceeded in the direction of Swallow Bluff, on the Tennessee River, meeting with no opposition. Near Swallow Bluff we separated, the Alabama cavalry moving up the river. After we parted I had a fight with some of Colonel Biffle's men across the river, but do not know the amount of damage done. We saw some of the rebels fall from their horses--three, if no more — but do not know whether they were shot dead or not. The rebels soon left the bank — yea, fled incontinently. I then turned north-west, and after marching about ten miles I met a squad of rebels and exchanged several shots with them, when, as usual, the rebels fled. We received no damage, and we presumed that we had done them but little. I then conti
m, when, as usual, the rebels fled. We received no damage, and we presumed that we had done them but little. I then continued my course about four miles, and bivouacked for the night. On the morning of the fourth we mounted, and scouted the country in all directions until evening, when I started for Smith's Mill, on White Oak Creek, where we spent the night. On the morning of the fifth we again mounted, and went about seven miles in a northwestern direction, when we met a portion of Captain Stinnett's guerrillas and had a right sharp fight, capturing his first lieutenant, first sergeant, and fifteen men. We had the fight on the north fork of White Oak Creek, about eight miles southeast of Jack's Creek. I then concluded to make my way back to Lagrange, which I did, arriving in camp on the seventh with my seventeen prisoners, neither myself nor any of my little squad having received a scratch. I respectfully submit the above report, and also the seventeen greybacks, to your pate
Doc. 149.-reconnoissance from Lagrange. Lieutenant Smith's report. Lagrange, Tenn., August 9. Colonel Hurst: I beg leave to make the following report of a scout of which I had command, by order of Colonel Hatch: On the second instant Colonel Hatch ordered me, with sixteen men, to take a despatch to General Dodge at Corinth. Leaving Colonel Hatch at Lexington, I started to Corinth, and on the morning of the third I met the First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being well acquainted with that portion, of country. We then proceeded in the direction of Swallow Bluff, on the Tennessee River, meeting with no opposition. Near Swallow Bluff we separated, the Alabama cavalry moving up the river. After we parted I had a fight with some of Colonel Biffle's men across the river, but do not know the amoun
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