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y wounded. This terminated the battle, the enemy retiring to his lines, leaving the field strewed with his dead and wounded, and numerous prisoners in our hands. Buford's division of cavalry, after its arduous service at Gettysburgh, on the first, was, on the second, sent to Westminster to refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the twenty-ninth, thirtieth, and first had been successfully engaging the enemy's cavalry, was, on the third, sent out on our extreme left, onrough the mountain pass, only two divisions of Hill's corps crossed the mountain on the thirtieth. Earry on Wednesday Hill's remaining division (Anderson's) and Longstreet's corps moved on after Hill's advance. At ten o'clock A. M. on the first instant, Heth's division being ahead, encountered the enemy's advance line — the Eleventh corps--about three miles west of Gettysburgh. Here a sharp en. gagement began, our men steadily advancing and driving the enemy before them to the town and to
inster at eleven P. M. first. I broke up my headquarters, which till then had been at Taneytown, and proceeded to the field, arriving there at one A. M. of the second. So soon as it was light I proceeded to inspect the position occupied and to make arrangements for posting several corps as they should reach the ground. By sth his dead and wounded, and numerous prisoners in our hands. Buford's division of cavalry, after its arduous service at Gettysburgh, on the first, was, on the second, sent to Westminster to refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the twenty-ninth, thirtieth, and first had been successfully engaging the enemision, and McLaws's division, of Longstreet's corps, got up to within a mile or two of the town, and bivouacked for the night. Early next (Thursday) morning, the second, Hood's division also got up, and our line of battle was formed. The enemy during the night had succeeded in getting up his entire force — some one hundred and t
he Sixth corps, maintained his position and inflicted very severe losses on the enemy. With this exception, our lines remained undisturbed till one P. M. on the third, when the enemy opened from over one hundred and twenty-five guns, playing upon our centre and left. This cannonade continued for over two hours, when, our guns f refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the twenty-ninth, thirtieth, and first had been successfully engaging the enemy's cavalry, was, on the third, sent out on our extreme left, on the Emmetsburgh road, where good service was rendered in assaulting the enemy's line and occupying his attention. At the same in the mean time had strengthened his line with earthworks. The morning was occupied in necessary preparations, and the battle recommenced in the afternoon of the third, and raged with great violence until sunset. Our troops succeeded in entering the advanced works of the enemy, and getting possession of some of his batteries; bu
marched to the same place. They were followed on the fourth and fifth by Ewell's corps, leaving that of A. P. Hill to occupy our lines at Fredericksburgh. The march of these troops having been discovered by the enemy on the afternoon of the fifth, and the following day he crossed a force, amounting to about one army corps, to the south side of the Rappahannock, on a pontoon-bridge laid down near the mouth of Deep Run. General Hill disposed his command to resist their advance, but as they d second days' engagements were left behind. Little progress was made that night, owing to a severe storm, which greatly embarrassed our movements. The rear of the column did not leave its position near Gettysburgh until after daylight on the fifth. The march was continued during that day without interruption by the enemy, except an unimportant demonstration upon our rear in the afternoon, when near Fairfield, which was easily checked. Part of our train moved by the road through Fairfie
crossed a force, amounting to about one army corps, to the south side of the Rappahannock, on a pontoon-bridge laid down near the mouth of Deep Run. General Hill disposed his command to resist their advance, but as they seemed intended for the purpose of observation rather than attack, the movements in progress were not arrested. The forces of Longstreet and Ewell reached Culpeper Court-House by the eighth, at which point the cavalry, under General Stuart, was also concentrated. On the ninth a large force of Federal cavalry, strongly supported by infantry, crossed the Rappahannock at Beverly's and Kelly's Fords, and attacked General Stuart. A severe engagement ensued, continuing from early in the morning until late in the afternoon, when the enemy was forced to recross the river with heavy loss, leaving four hundred prisoners, three pieces of artillery and several colors in our hands. General Jenkins, with his cavalry brigade, had been ordered to advance toward Winchester to
n having during these days the volunteer aid of Dr. Hooper, from Boston, who devoted himself to this latter work. Mr. Clark, from New-Hampshire, Mr. Hawkins, from Media, Pa., and Mr. Shippen, from Pittsburgh, also lent their assistance, and all these gentlemen materially aided us at this and at the second lodge until it was fully organized. With the transfer of our material to town, the irregular organization was changed to a permanent working basis. Dr. W. F. Cheney, who arrived on the tenth, was placed in charge of the camp. He brought with him seven assistants, Messrs. Latz, Cooley, McGuinness, Chesebro, Blakeley, Sherwin, Freshoner, from Canandaigua, N. Y. To these were added Messrs. Reisinger and Hall, from Baltimore, and four detailed soldiers. Cooks had arrived, a large shed for a kitchen had been erected, and full preparations were made for feeding any number. Every facility was granted us by the medical officers of the post and by the commissary. Additional tents wer
bridge left at Falling Waters had been partially destroyed. The enemy had not yet made his appearance, but, as he was in condition to obtain large reenforcements, and our situation for the reasons above mentioned was becoming daily more embarrassing, it was deemed advisable to recross the river. Part of the pontoon-bridge was recovered, and new boats built, so that by the thirteenth a good bridge was thrown over the river at Falling Waters. The enemy in force reached our front on the twelfth. A position had been previously selected to cover the Potomac from Williamsport to Falling Waters, and an attack was awaited during that and the succeeding day. This did not take place, though the two armies were in close proximity, the enemy being occupied in fortifying his own lines. Our preparations being completed, and the river, though still deep, being pronounced fordable, the army commenced to withdraw to the south side on the night of the thirteenth. Ewell's corps forded the ri
dging the force stationed there, to cut off the communication between Winchester and the Potomac. With the divisions of Early and Johnson, General Ewell advanced directly upon Winchester, driving the enemy into his works around the town on the thirteenth. On the same day the troops at Berryville fell back before General Rodes, retreating to Winchester. On the fourteenth General Early stormed the works at the latter place, and the whole army of General Milroy was captured or dispersed. Most oneral. The first movement toward the invasion of Pennsylvania was opened soon after the battle of Chancellorsville by a cavalry movement, which was met and quashed at Brandy Station by General Pleasanton, about the first of June. On the thirteenth ultimo, General Milroy was attacked at Winchester by the advance of Lee's army under General Ewell, and fled disgracefully, after a short conflict, to Harper's Ferry, abandoning all his stores and cannon to the rebels. This opened the way for the
d in making reconnoissances of the enemy's position and preparations for attack, but on advancing on the morning of the fourteenth, it was ascertained he had retired the night previous by a bridge at Falling Waters and a ford at Williamsport. The thirteenth. On the same day the troops at Berryville fell back before General Rodes, retreating to Winchester. On the fourteenth General Early stormed the works at the latter place, and the whole army of General Milroy was captured or dispersed. M small party of fugitives. General Rodes marched from Berryville. to Martinsburgh, entering the latter place on the fourteenth, where he took seven hundred prisoners, five pieces of artillery and a considerable quantity of stores. These operatio upon the bridge. Owing to the condition of the roads, the troops did not reach the bridge until after daylight on the fourteenth, and the crossing was not completed until one P. M., when the bridge was removed. The enemy offered no serious interru
ther from his base, and at the same time to cover the march of A. P. Hill, who, in accordance with instructions, left Fredericksburgh for the valley as soon as the enemy withdrew from his front, Longstreet moved from Culpeper Court-House on the fifteenth, and advancing along the east side of the Blue Ridge, occupied Ashby's and Snicker's Gaps. His force had been augmented while at Culpeper by General Pickett, with three brigades of his division. The cavalry, under General Stuart, was thrownled disgracefully, after a short conflict, to Harper's Ferry, abandoning all his stores and cannon to the rebels. This opened the way for the advance of the foe across the Potomac. Another force of its cavalry crossed the upper Potomac on the fifteenth, causing great consternation in Maryland and Lower Pennsylvania. It entered Chambersburgh and Mercersburgh in the evening. The alarm caused by this raid was unnecessarily great, for the main army of Lee had not yet reached the south side of t
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