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the right wing, of the army of the Cumberland from Franklin to Triune, we marched there on June third, leaving a small force at Franklin under Colonel Baird, of the Eighty-fifth Indiana, to hold the fortifications. The rebel forces in front, at Spring hill, having been foiled in their two attacks under Van Dorn, thinking that now or never was their time to capture it, made a desperate dash, with some five or six thousand cavalry and some artillery under General Forrest, on Thursday, the fourth instant. We heard the cannonading of the rebels and the replies of the heavy fortification guns at Triune at three P. M. Signals having been passed here at half-past 3, General Granger ordered Colonel A. P. Campbell, of the Second Michigan, commanding the First cavalry brigade, to hasten with his troops to the relief of Franklin. He galloped out at four o'clock with his cavalry in the following order: Sixth Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Watkins commanding; Fourth Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Cooper c
m, but fortunately none of the inhabitants were injured. At eight P. M. General Granger ordered a brigade of infantry and a battery of artillery from Triune to Franklin. Marching through the storm and darkness, they arrived at daylight on the fifth. There were reconnoissances made by the infantry and some artillery and a small force of cavalry on the fifth, and there was some little skirmishing, but the enemy had withdrawn his forces to Spring Hill at two P. M. and the dropping shots ceasefifth, and there was some little skirmishing, but the enemy had withdrawn his forces to Spring Hill at two P. M. and the dropping shots ceased. The troops that had marched from Triune to the relief of Franklin returned to camp here on the sixth. The Federal cavalry loss was three killed and four wounded. The rebel loss was twenty-five men and three officers killed and wounded in our hands, (besides those who escaped wounded,) and twenty-five prisoners. The rebel surgeon who came over to look after their wounded said that General Armstrong acknowledged himself badly whipped, and that it was only the darkness that enabled him t
brigade of infantry and a battery of artillery from Triune to Franklin. Marching through the storm and darkness, they arrived at daylight on the fifth. There were reconnoissances made by the infantry and some artillery and a small force of cavalry on the fifth, and there was some little skirmishing, but the enemy had withdrawn his forces to Spring Hill at two P. M. and the dropping shots ceased. The troops that had marched from Triune to the relief of Franklin returned to camp here on the sixth. The Federal cavalry loss was three killed and four wounded. The rebel loss was twenty-five men and three officers killed and wounded in our hands, (besides those who escaped wounded,) and twenty-five prisoners. The rebel surgeon who came over to look after their wounded said that General Armstrong acknowledged himself badly whipped, and that it was only the darkness that enabled him to draw off his forces, they having a thorough knowledge of the country. In the reconnoissance of th
fifty. General Armstrong was severely wounded, some prisoners say killed, and Starnes is among their missing. A flag of truce approached our outposts this morning to inquire if he had fallen into our hands. Kentucky. Another narrative. camp Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, Triune, June 7, 1863. Major-General Gordon Granger having been ordered by General Rosecrans to move the main portion of the right wing, of the army of the Cumberland from Franklin to Triune, we marched there on June third, leaving a small force at Franklin under Colonel Baird, of the Eighty-fifth Indiana, to hold the fortifications. The rebel forces in front, at Spring hill, having been foiled in their two attacks under Van Dorn, thinking that now or never was their time to capture it, made a desperate dash, with some five or six thousand cavalry and some artillery under General Forrest, on Thursday, the fourth instant. We heard the cannonading of the rebels and the replies of the heavy fortification guns
Doc. 4.-fight at Franklin, Tenn. Franklin, Tenn., June 7, 1863. Early on Thursday morning, June fourth, the enemy left his cantonments at Spring Hill, and advanced upon this post, anticipating an easy victory. Our force consisted of one regiment of cavalry (Seventh Kentucky) and about a regiment of infantry, under the command of Colonel Baird, of the Eighty-first Illinois, who was commandant of the post. The force of the enemy consisted of the brigades of Armstrong and Jackson, and the cavalry division of the late Van Dorn, now commanded by Starnes, the whole under the control of Forrest. About two o'clock P. M. his advance-guards commenced skirmishing with our cavalry pickets, and immediately afterwards heavy columns made their appearance upon the Lewisburgh, Columbia, and Carter's Creek roads. Such being the superiority of the enemy in point of numbers, our cavalry videttes retired slowly, hotly contesting every inch of ground, and expecting to be supported by the infa
June 7th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 4
Doc. 4.-fight at Franklin, Tenn. Franklin, Tenn., June 7, 1863. Early on Thursday morning, June fourth, the enemy left his cantonments at Spring Hill, and advanced upon this post, anticipating an easy victory. Our force consisted of one regiment of cavalry (Seventh Kentucky) and about a regiment of infantry, under the command of Colonel Baird, of the Eighty-first Illinois, who was commandant of the post. The force of the enemy consisted of the brigades of Armstrong and Jackson, and d, some prisoners say killed, and Starnes is among their missing. A flag of truce approached our outposts this morning to inquire if he had fallen into our hands. Kentucky. Another narrative. camp Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, Triune, June 7, 1863. Major-General Gordon Granger having been ordered by General Rosecrans to move the main portion of the right wing, of the army of the Cumberland from Franklin to Triune, we marched there on June third, leaving a small force at Franklin unde
A. J. Armstrong (search for this): chapter 4
ird, of the Eighty-first Illinois, who was commandant of the post. The force of the enemy consisted of the brigades of Armstrong and Jackson, and the cavalry division of the late Van Dorn, now commanded by Starnes, the whole under the control of Fo killed, wounded, and missing, will not exceed twenty-five. The enemy's loss is not far off one hundred and fifty. General Armstrong was severely wounded, some prisoners say killed, and Starnes is among their missing. A flag of truce approached oustand the deadly fire of our revolving rifles of the Second Michigan. He was pressed so closely at this point that General Armstrong's battle-flag and four of his escort were captured by the first battalion, Second Michigan, Captain Smith, and he lcaped wounded,) and twenty-five prisoners. The rebel surgeon who came over to look after their wounded said that General Armstrong acknowledged himself badly whipped, and that it was only the darkness that enabled him to draw off his forces, they
J. P. Baird (search for this): chapter 4
s post, anticipating an easy victory. Our force consisted of one regiment of cavalry (Seventh Kentucky) and about a regiment of infantry, under the command of Colonel Baird, of the Eighty-first Illinois, who was commandant of the post. The force of the enemy consisted of the brigades of Armstrong and Jackson, and the cavalry divi main portion of the right wing, of the army of the Cumberland from Franklin to Triune, we marched there on June third, leaving a small force at Franklin under Colonel Baird, of the Eighty-fifth Indiana, to hold the fortifications. The rebel forces in front, at Spring hill, having been foiled in their two attacks under Van Dorn, trces, they having a thorough knowledge of the country. In the reconnoissance of the fifth, Colonel Faulkner, commanding the Seventh Kentucky, (being part of Colonel Baird's forces,) most unfortunately got severely wounded in the thigh and scrotum by a musket-ball. Colonel Campbell complimented the officers and men of his comm
fortifications on the north bank of the river, leaving the handful of cavalry (about sixty in number) to come out of a tight fix in the best manner they could. About this time, probably a half-hour after the first gun was fired, Colonel Faulkner was ordered to move his regiment, the Seventh Kentucky cavalry, over the river, and keep the enemy from obtaining possession of the town. The boys went in with a yell, and the battalions, severally commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Vimont, and Majors Bradley and Collier, succeeded in repulsing the enemy at every point, and for some three hours held the town against every odds brought to bear against it. After the enemy commenced sweeping the streets of the town with round shot and grape, the Seventh only retired to the north of Harpeth, after being repeatedly ordered to do so by the post commandant. Some of the most brilliant cavalry exploits it has ever been my lot to witness were performed by these gallant Kentuckians during this unequal
isabled by his horse falling while he was heading a charge. The animal was going at full speed, and fell upon the Colonel's right leg, terribly bruising and otherwise injuring that member. All these regiments performed their duty as soldiers should. Everywhere the enemy was broken and disorganized by their impetuous charges. When the shades of night fell upon the hard-fought field, the enemy had been driven to his original position among the hills south of town. Next morning, Friday, Brownlow's East-Tennessee regiment was ordered to cross the river and feel the enemy's position, which had evidently been shifted during the course of the night. He was accompanied by Colonel Faulkner, of the Seventh Kentucky. About two miles from town, on the Columbia pike, the enemy was discovered drawn up in line of battle, a force of four or five hundred occupying a commanding eminence, protected at all points by heavy stone fencing. Colonel Faulkner obtained permission to take two companies
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