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Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
e same latitude of visiting families in the neighborhood. It will be equally satisfactory to know that this lovely spirit of humanity and chivalry does not exist alone at Richmond, but among the chivalrous cut-throats of Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas. The rebels hung Colonel Montgomery in Texas recently, and Colonel Davis nearly escaped the same fate. If it be argued that these men were deserters, pray what is Gardner himself? We feast their officers with liberty and champagne. Which codeTexas recently, and Colonel Davis nearly escaped the same fate. If it be argued that these men were deserters, pray what is Gardner himself? We feast their officers with liberty and champagne. Which code of etiquette is the right one our military authorities must determine; but, in the name of common-sense, let the rule be uniform and reciprocal. After the two attempts made to reduce Port Hudson by a land assault, or rather the reconnoissances in force to that effect, on the twenty-seventh May and fourteenth June, General Banks showed great judgment and humanity in not attempting it again until he had fully invested the place by a series of irresistible approaches. His wisdom in this mat
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
told that the rebels now treat our prisoners just as well as we treat theirs. The country will be glad to know that it is so, and that if they cannot afford champagne to their brave prisoners, they at least show them the same polite attentions and allow them the same latitude of visiting families in the neighborhood. It will be equally satisfactory to know that this lovely spirit of humanity and chivalry does not exist alone at Richmond, but among the chivalrous cut-throats of Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas. The rebels hung Colonel Montgomery in Texas recently, and Colonel Davis nearly escaped the same fate. If it be argued that these men were deserters, pray what is Gardner himself? We feast their officers with liberty and champagne. Which code of etiquette is the right one our military authorities must determine; but, in the name of common-sense, let the rule be uniform and reciprocal. After the two attempts made to reduce Port Hudson by a land assault, or rather the recon
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
bowels of the lofty bluffs they had dug deep recesses, approached by steps cut out of the earth, and here their magazines were placed quite safe — owing to the enormous thickness of earth above — from any projectiles that could be sent against them. One or two quaker guns were found. On the fortifications to the land side, every thing told of the terrible efficiency of our artillery, which never did its work better. Foremost among these were Mack's, Holcomb's, and Rawle's batteries, the Indiana battery, and the naval battery of heavy guns, under the gallant Lieutenant Terry, of the Richmond, and his fine crew, who sent desolation along with every shot from their large pieces. The effect was, that soon after we began bombarding in earnest, every gun upon the front batteries was silenced; and they have so remained for weeks since; any one they replaced being knocked over as soon as we got the range of it. In speaking of how much we owe the artillery, we cannot speak too highly of t
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
e to maintain his position further. I suppose you will allow we defended our position here well. Too well, I replied; I think a great many good lives, on both sides, might have been saved by sooner surrendering a place which, it must have been evident, you could not possibly retain. We should have done so, he candidly avowed, only we were all the while hoping for reinforcements. After a few more polite remarks, I left him for another part of the field. He was a young officer from Maryland, and said he had not seen his home for three years. Surely, never were more splendid zeal and courage exhibited in a worse cause. General Gardner is a man of about forty-five, apparently, tall and erect, with well-developed dark-brown beard and moustache, and of quite a martial bearing. When the ceremonies of a formal surrender were over, he came, in company with General Stone, to make a call on General Augur, on his way to the headquarters of General Banks. He and his staff seemed t
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 40
een the commissioners on the part of the garrison of Port Hudson, La., and the forces of the United States before said place, July eighth, 1863: article 1. Major-General Frank Gardner surrendereition of Port Hudson shall be occupied to-morrow at seven o'clock A. M. by the forces of the United States, and its garrison received as prisoners of war by such general officers of the United StatesUnited States service as may be designated by Major-General Banks, with the ordinary formalities of rendition. The confederate troops will be drawn up in line, officers in their positions, the right of the line The arms and colors will be piled conveniently, and will be received by the officers of the United States. article 5. The sick and wounded of the garrison will be cared for by the authorities of the United States, assisted, if desired, by either party of the medical officers of the garrison. Charles P. Stone, Brigadier-General W. N. Miles, Colonel Commanding Right Wing of the Army. Wm. D
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
g received information from your troops that Vicksburgh has been surrendered, I make this communicatadquarters Department of the Tennessee, near Vicksburgh, July 4. To Major-General N. P. Banks, Commaent of the Gulf: General: The garrison of Vicksburgh surrendered this morning. The number of pri announcing the surrender of the garrison of Vicksburgh. Having defended this position as long ass no idle gossip, but I know to be so)--that Vicksburgh only made a difference to him of three days.to be hidden in the larger but fuller one of Vicksburgh; but must stand upon its own intrinsic indivt. Two grand things are taught us by both Vicksburgh and Port Hudson--(so like in their aim, deta, said he. could not help fancying he was at Vicksburgh )--and those are: First, that there is nothiin, said he did not believe, even then, that Vicksburgh had capitulated. Another amusing instance ched us on the seventh instant of the fall of Vicksburgh, Colonel Nelson, commanding the colored regi[1 more...]
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
Hudson. Official correspondence. headquarters of the nineteenth army corps, Department of the Gulf, Port Hudson, July 9. General: I have the honor to inform you that Port Hudson surrendered yesterday morning without conditions. We took possession at seven o'clock this morning. The number of prisoners and guns is unknown as yet, but is estimated at five thousand prisoners and fifty pieces of artillery. Very respectfully, Brigadier-General W. H. Emory, Commanding Defences of New-Orleans. Richardb. Irwin, A. A. General. To Major-General Banks, Commanding United States Forces near Port Hudson: headquarters Port Hudson, La., July 7. General: Having received information from your troops that Vicksburgh has been surrendered, I make this communication to ask you to give me the official assurance whether this is true or not, and if true I ask for a cessation of hositilities with a view to the consideration of terms for surrendering this position. I am, General, very resp
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
m! I am told that the rebels now treat our prisoners just as well as we treat theirs. The country will be glad to know that it is so, and that if they cannot afford champagne to their brave prisoners, they at least show them the same polite attentions and allow them the same latitude of visiting families in the neighborhood. It will be equally satisfactory to know that this lovely spirit of humanity and chivalry does not exist alone at Richmond, but among the chivalrous cut-throats of Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas. The rebels hung Colonel Montgomery in Texas recently, and Colonel Davis nearly escaped the same fate. If it be argued that these men were deserters, pray what is Gardner himself? We feast their officers with liberty and champagne. Which code of etiquette is the right one our military authorities must determine; but, in the name of common-sense, let the rule be uniform and reciprocal. After the two attempts made to reduce Port Hudson by a land assault, or rather
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
Doc. 38.-capture of Port Hudson. Official correspondence. headquarters of the nineteenth army corps, Department of the Gulf, Port Hudson, July 9. General: I have the honor to inform you that Port Hudson surrendered yesterday morning without conditions. We took possession at seven oBanks, Commanding United States Forces near Port Hudson: headquarters Port Hudson, La., July 7. Port Hudson, La., July 7. General: Having received information from your troops that Vicksburgh has been surrendered, I make trsday, July 9, 1863. Heaven be praised! Port Hudson is ours! In my late letters I have inforl. After the two attempts made to reduce Port Hudson by a land assault, or rather the reconnoissthings are taught us by both Vicksburgh and Port Hudson--(so like in their aim, details and resultstinguished himself in the grand attack upon Port Hudson — and the gallant crew under him, did their words, we could find no negro prisoners in Port Hudson, and there were none in the hospital. The [20 more...]
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
burgh; but must stand upon its own intrinsic individuality; a result of certain irresistible combination, and not the mere sequence of a previous disaster to the rebels. General Gardner also says that the very day our lines closed in on him--May twenty--fourth--brought him, by a courier who came through safely, a positive order from General Johnston to evacuate the post. This shows the wonderful rapidity and dexterity with which General Banks wheeled his army round from Alexandria and Baton Rouge upon the unsuspecting rebel chief, and should never be lost sight of in forming a fair estimate of this very brilliant military movement. Two grand things are taught us by both Vicksburgh and Port Hudson--(so like in their aim, details and results, that Colonel Smith, of General Grant's staff, while riding along our intrenchments, said he. could not help fancying he was at Vicksburgh )--and those are: First, that there is nothing like dash and determined, rapid aggressive movement agai
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