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Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 51
e information received at Loudon. The artillery and infantry that started to the ferry were ordered back by General White upon receipt of a telegram from General Burnside to hold his command ready to march in the direction of Knoxville at a moment's notice. The order was received and the troops took up a line of march and arrived at Lenoirs about seven o'clock A. M., November fourteenth. A description of the situation of Huff's Ferry would not be inappropriate here. It is on the Tennessee River, half a mile from Loudon, on the south bank of the river, but by a long bend in the river at that point, it is six miles by the road, on the north side. This road is the only one the troops could take to get to that point. Shortly after the arrival of General White at Lenoirs, General Burnside arrived on a train from Knoxville to command in person the movement of the troops. A countermarch to Loudon was immediately ordered. A reliable spy had brought information that the rebels we
Loudon, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
renched it from the rebels. Our troops evacuated Loudon the latter part of October. The Second division, Tks of the river from the town. The rebels occupied Loudon and the heights around, in what force we could not watch and operate against the rebel force occupying Loudon. This programme was carried out to the very letterst, General Potter, all the information received at Loudon. The artillery and infantry that started to the re. It is on the Tennessee River, half a mile from Loudon, on the south bank of the river, but by a long bendrson the movement of the troops. A countermarch to Loudon was immediately ordered. A reliable spy had broughtion that the rebels were constructing a pontoon at Loudon, and doing nothing at Huff's Ferry. This he knew--iers, who had carried water from the river opposite Loudon for three weeks, and up to the time reliable spy hay traitors. The troops, therefore, marched back to Loudon, expecting to meet the enemy at that point. Arrive
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
Doc. 49.-the East-Tennessee campaign. Louisville Journal account. Knoxville, Tenn., November 25, 1863. since it was first known to the public that Major-General Burnside would attempt the accomplishment of an object, namely, the occupation of East-Tennessee, and which would give a prestige to the Union arms heretofore unattained, if successful, and would sever the connection betweeon the expressed opinion of some of our greatest Generals that a successful campaign into East-Tennessee was impossible. And at best, if it should by any oversight of the rebel authorities be succesopose to give an account of the events of a few days past, which have settled the fate of East-Tennessee and the brave army that wrenched it from the rebels. Our troops evacuated Loudon the latterns of this latter-day evil spirit, and would, by his power, discover to the deliverers of East-Tennessee the operations of these wily traitors. The troops, therefore, marched back to Loudon, expecti
Holy City (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
. This road is the only one the troops could take to get to that point. Shortly after the arrival of General White at Lenoirs, General Burnside arrived on a train from Knoxville to command in person the movement of the troops. A countermarch to Loudon was immediately ordered. A reliable spy had brought information that the rebels were constructing a pontoon at Loudon, and doing nothing at Huff's Ferry. This he knew--had seen it with his own eyes. Reliable spies are infallible. The Holy City never had within its sacred precincts an Otho or Pius, whose high conceptions of morality taught them the invaluable worth of truth more surely than the ordeal through which they had to pass taught the loyal East-Tennesseeans, and they whose names lead all the rest are the reliable spies and scouts. One thousand five hundred soldiers, who had carried water from the river opposite Loudon for three weeks, and up to the time reliable spy had seen the bridge, and a part of them from the very
Station West (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
ved no benefit from this abandonment of property, as every thing was destroyed. Marching in the direction of Knoxville, we were overtaken by the enemy at Campbell's Station at twelve o'clock M., November sixteenth, and the battle of Campbell's Station commenced. One brigade of the Ninth corps was in the advance, the Second briCampbell's Station commenced. One brigade of the Ninth corps was in the advance, the Second brigade of the Twenty-third corps in the centre, and one brigade of the Ninth corps as rear-guard. The skirmishing was begun by the Ninth corps, the First brigade of the Ninth corps forming in the rear of General White's command, which formed in line to protect the stock, etc., as it passed to the rear, and to cover the retreat of tto the performance of their duty and to victory, and still remains, as he says, to see it through. The Ninth army corps was engaged only in the battle of Campbell's Station, and there sustained the honor of their past history. The troops arrived at Knoxville at daylight November seventeenth, from which time dates the siege o
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 51
ich was the rear-guard and was to file past it. Again was the Second brigade in position where it must receive the first shock of battle, and must win more or lose the honors already won. The arrangements for battle had hardly been completed before the cavalry came in from the front followed by the infantry of the Ninth corps, and two heavy lines of the enemy emerged from the wood three quarters of a mile in front. Each line consisted of a division, and were dressed almost wholly in the United States uniform, which at first deceived us. Their first line advanced to within eight hundred yards of General White's front before that officer gave the order to fire. Henshaw's and the Twenty-fourth Indiana batteries then opened on them with shell, but they moved steadily forward, closing up as their lines would be broken by this terrible fire, until within three hundred and fifty yards of our main line, when the batteries mentioned opened on them with canister, and four batteries in the rea
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
aign. Louisville Journal account. Knoxville, Tenn., November 25, 1863. since it was firstcommunicated to General Burnside, who was at Knoxville. General White ordered the field-officer ofs command ready to march in the direction of Knoxville at a moment's notice. The order was receivers, General Burnside arrived on a train from Knoxville to command in person the movement of the troy guess, supposing the army would move on to Knoxville, and no harm being done, the facts would never was received to march in the direction of Knoxville, which was immediately obeyed. On this retrs destroyed. Marching in the direction of Knoxville, we were overtaken by the enemy at Campbell'r troops to fall back to resume the march to Knoxville. The management of the troops as they mov from the field and conducted the retreat to Knoxville. To mention the names of the brave men, oth success. He communicated to his chief at Knoxville all the information he received, and obeyed [1 more...]
Lenoirs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
dered the evacuation of the town. A division of the Ninth army corps occupied Lenoirs, six miles above. With this support for General White, one brigade of the Sec The order was received and the troops took up a line of march and arrived at Lenoirs about seven o'clock A. M., November fourteenth. A description of the situatld take to get to that point. Shortly after the arrival of General White at Lenoirs, General Burnside arrived on a train from Knoxville to command in person the mgaged. At daylight the next morning the troops took up the line of march to Lenoirs. The duty of rearguard was assigned to the Second brigade of General White's section of artillery, soon checked the enemy, and the march was resumed toward Lenoirs, where we arrived early in the afternoon. In this skirmish the One Hundred an twenty men killed and wounded. About four o'clock P. M., after arriving at Lenoirs, it was discovered that the main if not the entire rebel force had advanced an
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
m the command of the brigade at times devolved, behaved always as became the hero of Huff's Ferry. Lieutenant-Colonel Lowry, of the One Hundred and Seventh Illinois; Major Sherwood, of the One Hundred and Eleventh Ohio; and Major Wheeler, of the Twentythird Michigan, each commanding, all carried themselves nobly. I must mention the name of ex-Colonel Joseph J. Kelly, of the One Hundred and Seventh Illinois, whose resignation had just been accepted, and who intended to start for his home in Illinois the day of the fight at Huff's Ferry, but would not leave while the regiment he had so long commanded was in the face of the enemy. He was with them all the time, urging them to the performance of their duty and to victory, and still remains, as he says, to see it through. The Ninth army corps was engaged only in the battle of Campbell's Station, and there sustained the honor of their past history. The troops arrived at Knoxville at daylight November seventeenth, from which time date
Kingston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
rom the town. The rebels occupied Loudon and the heights around, in what force we could not learn, nor was it of great importance, as the river was to be the future base of operations, and for this reason it was, as I have learned, that General Burnside ordered the evacuation of the town. A division of the Ninth army corps occupied Lenoirs, six miles above. With this support for General White, one brigade of the Second division, Twenty-third army corps, was ordered by General Burnside to Kingston, twenty miles below, leaving near one thousand five hundred men and two batteries, which was considered ample to watch and operate against the rebel force occupying Loudon. This programme was carried out to the very letter. On the night of the thirteenth of November, at nine o'clock, General White received the first report of any considerable force of rebels near us. This was reported to him by Captain Sims, of the Twenty-fourth Indiana battery, and was immediately communicated to Gener
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