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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 69
United States, with the assurance of this meeting of their hearty and earnest desire to support the Government in every constitutional and lawful measure to suppress the existing rebellion. President Lincoln's reply. Executive mansion, Washington, June 12, 1863. Hon. Erastus Corning and others: gentlemen: Your letter of May nineteenth, inclosing the resolutions of a public meeting held at Albany, New-York, on the sixteenth of the same month, was received several days ago. The res proceeds upon a total suspension of all the constitutional and legal safeguards which protect the rights of a citizen. It is a power not inaptly described in the language of one of your secretaries. Said Mr. Seward to the British minister in Washington: I can touch a bell on my right hand and order the arrest of a citizen of Ohio. I can touch the bell again and order the imprisonment of a citizen of New-York, and no power on earth but that of the President can release them. Can the Queen of
Albany (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 69
spondence in relation to the public meeting at Albany, N. Y.--letter of the committee and resolutions. Albany, May 19, 1863. To His Excellency the President of the United States: the undersignficers of a public meeting held at the city of Albany on the sixteenth day of May, instant, herewithResolutions adopted at the meeting held in Albany, N. Y., on the 16th of May, 1863. Resolved, The resolutions of a public meeting held at Albany, New-York, on the sixteenth of the same month, was s and wishes of those who, like the meeting at Albany, declare their purpose to sustain the Governmeic meeting held at the Capitol, in the city of Albany, on the sixteenth day of May, 1863, to conside We are, with great respect, very truly yours, Albany, June 30, 1863. Erastus Corning, President. Elons adopted at a recent meeting in the city of Albany affirming the personal rights and liberties ofMcKown, A. H. Tremain, Daniel Shaw, W. Simon, A. E. Stimson, Isaac Lederer. Albany, June 30, 1863.
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 69
ain the Union; at the time you were sworn into office as President of the United States, when you should have urged your fellowcitizens in the most emphatic manner to overlook all past differences and to rally in defence of their country and its institutions, when you should have enjoined respect for the laws and the Constitution, so clearly disregarded by the South, you chose, for the first time, under like circumstances in the history of our country, to set up a party platform, called the Chicago platform, as your creed; to advance it beyond the Constitution and to speak disparagingly of that great conservative tribunal of our country, so highly respected by all thinking men who have inquired into our institutions — the supreme Court of the United States. Your administration has been true to the principles you then laid down. Notwithstanding the fact that several hundred thousand Democrats in the loyal States cheerfully responded to the call of their country, filled the ranks of
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 69
h the will of a despot and a tyrant. It is a power without boundary or limit, because it proceeds upon a total suspension of all the constitutional and legal safeguards which protect the rights of a citizen. It is a power not inaptly described in the language of one of your secretaries. Said Mr. Seward to the British minister in Washington: I can touch a bell on my right hand and order the arrest of a citizen of Ohio. I can touch the bell again and order the imprisonment of a citizen of New-York, and no power on earth but that of the President can release them. Can the Queen of England, in her dominions, do as much? This is the very language of a perfect despotism, and we learn from you with profound emotion that this is no idle boast. It is a despotism unlimited in principle, because the same arbitrary and unrestrained will or discretion which can place men under illegal restraint, or banish them, can apply the rack or the thumbscrew, can put to torture or to death. Not thus h
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 69
rs ago, and they have been confirmed by many and repeated statutes of the realm. A single palpable violation of them in England would not only arouse the public indignation, but would endanger the throne itself. For a persistent disregard of them,robable cause, are duly and illegally charged with some known crime, and a suspension of the writ was never asked for in England or in this country, except to prevent such enlargement when the supposed offence was against the safety of the governmenly estimate the feeling of the people on this subject, that for the crime of dispensing with the laws and statutes of Great Britain, our ancestors brought one monarch to the scaffold, and expelled another from his throne. This power which you havprisonment of a citizen of New-York, and no power on earth but that of the President can release them. Can the Queen of England, in her dominions, do as much? This is the very language of a perfect despotism, and we learn from you with profound em
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 69
mind, in order that you may duly estimate the feeling of the people on this subject, that for the crime of dispensing with the laws and statutes of Great Britain, our ancestors brought one monarch to the scaffold, and expelled another from his throne. This power which you have erected in theory is of vast and illimitable proportions. If we may trust you to exercise it mercifully and leniently, your successor, whether immediate or more remote, may wield it with the energy of a Caesar or Napoleon, and with the will of a despot and a tyrant. It is a power without boundary or limit, because it proceeds upon a total suspension of all the constitutional and legal safeguards which protect the rights of a citizen. It is a power not inaptly described in the language of one of your secretaries. Said Mr. Seward to the British minister in Washington: I can touch a bell on my right hand and order the arrest of a citizen of Ohio. I can touch the bell again and order the imprisonment of a ci
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 69
unce the recent assumption of a military commander to seize and try a citizen of Ohio, Clement L. Vallandigham, for no other reason than words addressed to a public m peril of our cause abroad. And that, regarding the blow struck at a citizen of Ohio as aimed at the rights of every citizen of the North, we denounce it as against one has ever pretended that the writ of habeas corpus was suspended in the State of Ohio, where the arrest of a citizen at midnight, already referred to, was made, re is the justification for the monstrous proceeding in the case of a citizen of Ohio, to which we have called your attention? We know that a recreant judge, whose nington: I can touch a bell on my right hand and order the arrest of a citizen of Ohio. I can touch the bell again and order the imprisonment of a citizen of New-Yorkwas then, as you truly state, under martial or military law. This was not so in Ohio, where Mr. Vallandigham was arrested. The administration of the civil law had n
New York Point (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 69
sident. William Seymour, Vice-President. Jeremiah Osborn, Vice-President. William S. Padock, Vice-President. J. B. Sanders, Vice-President. Edward Mulcahy, Vice-President. D. V. N. Radcliffe, Vice-President. William A. Rice, Secretary. Edward Newcomb, Secretary. R. W. Peckham, Jr., Secretary. M. A. Nolan, Secretary. John R. Nessel, Secretary. C. W. Weeks, Secretary. Resolutions adopted at the meeting held in Albany, N. Y., on the 16th of May, 1863. Resolved, That the Democrats of New-York point to their uniform course of action during the two years of civil war through which we have passed, to the alacrity which they have evinced in filling the ranks of the army, to their contributions and sacrifices, as the evidence of their patriotism and devotion to the cause of our imperilled country. Never in the history of civil was has a government been sustained with such ample resources of means and men as the people have voluntarily placed in the hands of the Administration. Resol
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 69
Doc. 67.-military arrests. Correspondence in relation to the public meeting at Albany, N. Y.--letter of the committee and resolutions. Albany, May 19, 1863. To His Excellency the President of the United States: the undersigned, officers of a public meeting held at the city of Albany on the sixteenth day of May, instant, herewith transmit to your Excellency a copy of the resolutions adopted at the said meeting, and respectfully request your earnest consideration of them. They seem it proper on their personal responsibility to state that the meeting was one of the most respectable as to numbers and character, and one of the most earnest in the support of the Union ever held in this city. Yours, with great regard, Erastus Corning, President. Eli Perry, Vice-President. Peter Gansevoort, Vice-President. Peter Monteath, Vice-President. Samuel W. Gibbs, Vice-President. John Niblack, Vice-President. H. W. Mcclellan, Vice-President. Lemuel W. Rodgers, Vice-President. William Sey
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 69
ng stability of the republic. No one denies that they have so stood the test up to the beginning of the present rebellion, if we except a certain occurrence at New-Orleans; nor does any one question that they will stand the same test much longer after the rebellion closes. But these provisions of the Constitution have no applicatich your Excellency has presented demand our notice. In justification of your course as to Mr. Vallandigham, you have referred to the arrest of Judge Hall at New-Orleans, by order of General Jackson; but that case differs widely from the case of Mr. Vallandigham. New-Orleans was then, as you truly state, under martial or militaNew-Orleans was then, as you truly state, under martial or military law. This was not so in Ohio, where Mr. Vallandigham was arrested. The administration of the civil law had not been disturbed in that commonwealth. The courts were open, and justice was dispensed with its accustomed promptitude. In the case of Judge Hall, General Jackson in a few days sent him outside the line of his encampm
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